+
Promoting School Success
A project of the Downtown Education
Collaborative
+
DEC Office
 Across the street from the library
 A bridge between the colleges and the
downtown community
 A space for...
+ Meeting a Need in Downtown
Lewiston
 Lewiston has
historically had a
high dropout rate.
 In the past 10 years
there ha...
+
 DEC saw a place where it could bring its assets to
bear to address a critical community need.
 Working with the schoo...
+
 Coordinated by an AmeriCorps
VISTA Volunteer.
 Training developed and
implemented by staff and faculty
from DEC and i...
+
Expansion and Growth
13
30
256
2,423
300
3,261
$71
Average daily attendance Sept. 2008
Average daily attendance by April...
+
Growing Pains
 As the program
has expanded,
the capacity of the
small computer lab has
been tested.
 There are only 25...
+
Who are our students?
 The majority of our students
are African refugees from
Somalia and the Sudan.
 Our focus is on ...
+
Who are our tutors?
 We recruit from all four of DEC’s member academic institutions: Bates
College, CMCC, Kaplan Univer...
+
“I don’t have a computer at home, so
there is no way I could finish all of
my homework without Homework
Help!”
-Mana Abd...
+
+
“The tutors are really helpful and make
things a lot simpler.”
-Issauk Abdi ‘11 Lewiston High School
+
+
“I love working at the after-school
program at the library. Even on nice
days when they could be playing
outside, kids c...
+
“The tutors are more than just tutors. They care
about you, and that means a lot to me.”
-Abdullahi Shaleh, ‘12 Lewiston...
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Promoting School Success 2010-11

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An overview of the Promoting School Success Program, which is an after-school homework help program sponsored by the Downtown Education Collaborative.

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  • -These kids know that it is practically impossible to make it without a hs diploma and thus their motivation is high, but for the community now is the time. Any effort that we put now pays off big time bc needs a lost generation of kids without an education or skills to get a job because we want to work toward a well-educated, capable work force
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  • Promoting School Success 2010-11

    1. 1. + Promoting School Success A project of the Downtown Education Collaborative
    2. 2. + DEC Office  Across the street from the library  A bridge between the colleges and the downtown community  A space for community events, discussion, and dialogue
    3. 3. + Meeting a Need in Downtown Lewiston  Lewiston has historically had a high dropout rate.  In the past 10 years there has been a large increase in ELL students.  These challenges have stressed social services and the school system.  Some of the school-aged youth living in downtown Lewiston sought extra help from the staff at the Lewiston Public Library, but the Library did not have the capacity to meet the growing need.
    4. 4. +  DEC saw a place where it could bring its assets to bear to address a critical community need.  Working with the school department, the library and other partners DEC piloted The Promoting School Success Program in the fall of 2008. Assets  The LPL has a designated computer lab that is available as a site.  DEC has the resources of the four colleges that be designated to supporting the program.  The youth are highly motivated to learn. Birth of the School Success Program
    5. 5. +  Coordinated by an AmeriCorps VISTA Volunteer.  Training developed and implemented by staff and faculty from DEC and its member institutions.  Program staffed largely by students recruited from DEC’s four member colleges. Structure of the Program M-Th 3:30 – 5:30, Lewiston Public Library
    6. 6. + Expansion and Growth 13 30 256 2,423 300 3,261 $71 Average daily attendance Sept. 2008 Average daily attendance by April 2009 Students served during the 2008-09 school year Total visits during in 2008-09 Students served during the 2009-10 school year Total visits during the 2009-10 school year • Last year, of a core group of 28 students who attended regularly, 26 showed improvement in their grades and are now passing. -As reported by Sue Martin, the ELL coordinator for Lewiston. Per student cost of the program
    7. 7. + Growing Pains  As the program has expanded, the capacity of the small computer lab has been tested.  There are only 25 chairs available. So when numbers exceed 45 (as they tend to do toward the end of the quarter) it is difficult to find places for all of the kids.  As recently as Nov 10th, we had to open a homework help “annex” on the third floor to accommodate all of the students.
    8. 8. + Who are our students?  The majority of our students are African refugees from Somalia and the Sudan.  Our focus is on middle and high school students, 80% in grades 7-12.  About 60% of students are female.
    9. 9. + Who are our tutors?  We recruit from all four of DEC’s member academic institutions: Bates College, CMCC, Kaplan University, and USM-LAC.  Students are in service learning classes, are work study students, and are interns or volunteers.  We also have community volunteers including community police officers and an assistant rowing coach from Bates.  Several of our tutors are fluent in Somali which is a great resource.
    10. 10. + “I don’t have a computer at home, so there is no way I could finish all of my homework without Homework Help!” -Mana Abdi, ’13 Lewiston High School
    11. 11. +
    12. 12. + “The tutors are really helpful and make things a lot simpler.” -Issauk Abdi ‘11 Lewiston High School
    13. 13. +
    14. 14. + “I love working at the after-school program at the library. Even on nice days when they could be playing outside, kids come in to the library eager to learn. It’s been a great experience for me.” -Sam Polak, Bates ’11
    15. 15. + “The tutors are more than just tutors. They care about you, and that means a lot to me.” -Abdullahi Shaleh, ‘12 Lewiston High School

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