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Webinar business models for parcels terminals

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Webinar business models for parcels terminals

  1. 1. 1 Welcome to our Postal Webinar Series Use the chat window if you need help during the webinar, We will start in a few moments…
  2. 2. Parcels Terminals An Update on Leading Business Models
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. Parcels terminal networks: strong projections for growth 4  The e-commerce boom is pushing the rise of parcels terminal networks:  DHL: 2,500 PackStations in 1,600 cities.  Integer.pl: 16,000 easyPack terminals in Europe by the end of 2016  Itella Group: 350 stations by 2015  Post Denmark expanding from 131 to 200 “Døgnposten” units  Nightline plans : 400 “Parcel Motels”  The convenience of anywhere/anytime e-commerce is met by the convenience of anywhere/anytime pickup  Consumers delivery/pickup expectations are on the rise  DHL’ Control Cockpit  GLS Germany’s FlexDelivery Service
  5. 5. Sound business strategies for competitive advantage 5  To keep a competitive advantage parcels terminals operators must consider business models for:  Customer choice  Shipper Convenience  Increased Gain in Market Share  Improvement in Operational Efficiency  Financial Gain
  6. 6. Two categories of business models 6 Customer drives delivery into parcel terminal Shipper drives delivery toward parcel terminal Customer-driven Shipper-driven
  7. 7. Pull models 7 Customer-driven
  8. 8. Operator-exclusive proprietary network 8 Terminal Operator Customer-driven Customer Choice Choice of terminals may be limited Shipper Convenience Shippers limited to ship with terminal operator Operator’s Market Share Not likely to increase market share Operational Efficiency Delivery to terminals is highly efficient Finances (Terminal Operator) Low last mile costs Costs for deploying, managing terminals network
  9. 9. Customer Choice Choice of terminals may be limited Shipper Convenience Shipper can pick carrier of choice Carrier’s Market Share Not likely to increase market share Operational Efficiency Preferred carrier may not offer time-definite commitments Finances (Terminal Operator) Low last mile costs Costs for deploying, managing terminals network Some revenue for partial handling of preferred carriers’ parcels Carrier-agnostic, proprietary parcels terminal network (1) 9 Preferred Carrier Terminal Operator Customer-driven
  10. 10. Carrier-agnostic, proprietary parcels terminal network (2) 10 Customer Choice Choice of terminals may be limited Shipper Convenience Shipper can pick carrier of choice Operator’s Market Share Not likely to increase market share; Operational Efficiency Induction into depots efficient and not costly Preferred carrier likely to offer time-definite commitments Finances (Terminal Operator) Low last mile costs Costs for deploying, managing terminals network Some revenue for partial handling of preferred carriers’ parcels Preferred Carrier Terminal Operator Customer-driven
  11. 11. Success factors: Carrier-neutrality Convenience for customer adoption 11 Open Platform of Parcels Terminal Carriers Collaboration Customer-driven Terminal Operator
  12. 12. Success factors: some examples 12 Open Parcels Terminal Platform Carriers Collaboration Customer-driven Terminal Operator Subsidizes UK retailers to host terminalsNightline carrier-neutral approach Parcel Select Deploys Cleveron’s terminal with retailers in Baltic Countries Rents space from supermarkets, gas stations, etc.
  13. 13. Push models 13 Shipper-driven
  14. 14. Various Push models are emerging 14 Shipper-driven Proprietary solution with delivery by local carriers eCommerce Field-engineering support Supply Chain Solutions All shipments to terminals; paid by Avon Optional Shipment to terminals; paid by recipients Multi-Level Marketing Multi-Level Marketing
  15. 15. Adoption rate vary, and depend on the business model/objectives 15 Shipper-driven Partial push – terminals endorsed by shipper High adoption due to speed and cost of service Push-pull (collaboration) High adoption rate Pure push High adoption rate due to payment by shipper Partial push – terminals are endorsed by shipper Recipients influence adoption rate
  16. 16. What next? 16
  17. 17. Growth opportunities for parcels terminals 17 Consumer- based economy Just-in-time Supply Mgmt • Large distribution centers are moving to suburban or exurban areas • Proximity to road, rail, airport networks • Lower cost of land • Opportunity to service regional and national markets • Increase in delivery trips from distribution centers to urban areas • Congestion, noise pollution, CO2 emissions • Urban consolidation centers • Load consolidation among businesses to run joint delivery rounds • Delivery during off-hours New Approaches to Urban Logistics Environmental Un- sustainability Logistics Sprawl
  18. 18. Growth opportunities for parcels terminals  Local online shopping  Google shopping  Person to person commerce  craigslit, oodle.com  Virtual shopping  Tesco in South Korea  Cencosud in Chile  Reverse Logistics  Local recycling 18
  19. 19. Opportunities for new business models 19 Open Platform of Parcels Terminal Carriers Collaboration Terminal Operator
  20. 20. 20 > insight > action > transformation

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