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Poetry term powerpoint 1

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Poetry - Review of Terms

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Poetry term powerpoint 1

  1. 1.  Use the following questions and click on the answer which best completes the statement.
  2. 2. According to what you know, which of the following best defines the term listed above?
  3. 3. Choose the best answer. A. Snap, Crackle, Pop B. Snip, Chair, Pencil C. Red, White , Blue D. See, Spot, Run
  4. 4. Correct:A. Snap, Crackle, Pop best defines examples ofOnomatopoeia. Words that visually imitate the sound theymake.
  5. 5. WRONG: B. Although the word, “snip,” is an example ofOnomatopoeia the other words in the series do not imitate the sound they appear as to make.
  6. 6.  Wrong: C: Red, White, and Blue are simple adjectives and do not make sound. They are visual words which in poetry could be used to describe imagery, but NOT Onomatopoeia.
  7. 7. D. These words are NOT examples of Onomatopoeia.They were used in old-fashioned textbooks to teachsmall children how to read.
  8. 8. EXAMPLE of a poem using Onomatopoeia Crack an Egg Crack an egg. Stir the butter. Break the yolk. Make it flutter. Stoke the heat. Hear it sizzle. Shake the salt, just a drizzle. Flip it over, just like that. Press it down. Squeeze it flat. Pop the toast. Spread jam thin. Say the word. Breakfasts in . by Denise Rodgers
  9. 9. According to what you know, which of the following best defines the term listed above?
  10. 10. Choose the best answer! A. She walks in beauty like the night B. She sells seashells by the seashore C. She’s a lady D. She is like a moonlight sky
  11. 11. A. Although poetic in nature it this phrase is NOT an example of alliteration.Byron might be your choice to understand this phrase.
  12. 12. YES! B. Best shows an exampleof alliteration- the repetition ofthe initial consonant sound.Tongue twisters are usuallygood examples of this term.
  13. 13. D. Nope, Sorry.
  14. 14. According to what you know, which of the following bestdefines or demonstrates the term listed above?
  15. 15. A. I can teach you howto bottle fame, brew gloryeven stopper death —Professor Snape in Harry Potter by JKRowlingB. Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel both- Robert FrostC. Roses are redD. Four Score and Seven Years Ago.
  16. 16. A Japanese poem composed of three unrhymed lines of five,seven, and five syllables. Haiku often reflect on some aspect ofnature, but in modern times has come to address many topics.
  17. 17. B. No Way! Try Again. Althoughthese lines deal with nature,they do not follow the format ofa Haiku poem.
  18. 18. This is not correct. This is usually the beginning of a rhymepoem learned in elementary school. It has been around fordecades.
  19. 19. D. Abe Lincoln would be proudif you know the real, “Address,”of this line. It is not a Haiku.
  20. 20. According to what you know, which of the following bestdefines or demonstrates the term listed above?
  21. 21. A: TrueB: FalseAndrew Marvell’s lines here in To His Coy Mistress:An hundred years should go to praiseThine eyes and on thy forehead gaze;Two hundred to adore each breast;But thirty thousand to the rest …
  22. 22. A figure of speech in which deliberate exaggeration is used foremphasis is known as hyperbole.
  23. 23. B. Really? Who do you know besides WashingtonIrving’s fictional character-Rip Van Winkle whohas lived 100 years to praise the beauty of awoman?
  24. 24. http://www.types-of-poetry.org.uk/31-lyric-poetry.htm
  25. 25. According to what you know, which of the following bestdefines the term listed above?
  26. 26. A. The ability for words in a poem to paint a picture in the reader’s mind.B. The freedom of the poet to misuse spelling and grammar within a poemC. The seemingly natural word pattern of similar sounds within a poemD. Two lines with the same scheme
  27. 27. This is the definition of the term IMAGERY.
  28. 28. B. Not right. This is thedefinition to the term known aspoetic license.
  29. 29. When words have similar sounds and spelling in poetry, such as,might, night, and kite… Rhyming has occurred.
  30. 30. D. Boing, boing, bong. Wrong.This is a brief definition of thepoetic term known as a couplet.

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