“A Fable for Tomorrow”<br />What you could have said<br />
The Title<br />It’s a “fable”<br />Fairy tale <br />Sets you up for revelation that it’s not true (not a big pull the rug ...
Images: Positive<br />“checkerboard” farms<br />Lush growth<br />Variety of bird and animal life<br />All seasons are abun...
Images: Negative<br />Strange blight<br />Mysterious maladies<br />Unexpected deaths<br />(woo woowoo – it’s the Twilight ...
About the Contrast<br />Heaven/Hell or Peace/War<br />Note that “clouds” of blossom becomes sinister white cloud of powder...
Which brings us to her audience<br />Farmers<br />Rural<br />Not necessarily super well educated, but superstitious and re...
What are their values?<br />Money, yes, but<br />Health<br />“American” pastoral ideal<br />Family<br />And she plays to a...
Rhetorical Appeal: Ethos<br />Carson’s own credibility<br />Appeal to core “Americana” values<br />
Rhetorical Appeal: Pathos<br />Well, yeah… it’s pretty obvious.<br />(and this is one place where maybe you could attack h...
Is it Successful?<br />Well, that’s up to you, but you need to put it in context.  They hadn’t “heard it all before” in 19...
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A Fable For Tomorrow

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A Fable For Tomorrow

  1. 1. “A Fable for Tomorrow”<br />What you could have said<br />
  2. 2. The Title<br />It’s a “fable”<br />Fairy tale <br />Sets you up for revelation that it’s not true (not a big pull the rug out at the end)<br />Has a moral<br />Note the opening: “There was once…” like “once upon a time”<br />
  3. 3. Images: Positive<br />“checkerboard” farms<br />Lush growth<br />Variety of bird and animal life<br />All seasons are abundant and beautiful<br />
  4. 4. Images: Negative<br />Strange blight<br />Mysterious maladies<br />Unexpected deaths<br />(woo woowoo – it’s the Twilight zone!)<br />
  5. 5. About the Contrast<br />Heaven/Hell or Peace/War<br />Note that “clouds” of blossom becomes sinister white cloud of powder<br />“shady” pools of trout becomes “shadow of death” (and this is Biblical ref)<br />Blaze of colour in fall become brown and withered as though “swept by fire”<br />Also reference to Keats, “and no birds sang”<br />
  6. 6. Which brings us to her audience<br />Farmers<br />Rural<br />Not necessarily super well educated, but superstitious and religious<br />
  7. 7. What are their values?<br />Money, yes, but<br />Health<br />“American” pastoral ideal<br />Family<br />And she plays to all of those – even money; note that cash animals also die, and no pollination means no crops<br />
  8. 8. Rhetorical Appeal: Ethos<br />Carson’s own credibility<br />Appeal to core “Americana” values<br />
  9. 9. Rhetorical Appeal: Pathos<br />Well, yeah… it’s pretty obvious.<br />(and this is one place where maybe you could attack her for overdoing it. Maybe)<br />
  10. 10. Is it Successful?<br />Well, that’s up to you, but you need to put it in context. They hadn’t “heard it all before” in 1962.<br />

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