Com546 Final Pres

701 views

Published on

A study of historical and present disruption in the music industry.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
701
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
167
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Decreasing overall sales in an increasingly diversified market. Digital music services? - iTunes, Rhapsody, Pandora, Lala, Amazon, et yada Each with a slightly different listening paradigm. Growing LP sales!? Disruption is not new, however.
  • The advent of recorded music. Disrupted huge sheet music biz: multi-million selling sheet music. Did you know? First 1 million selling record was recorded in 1904. Pre-electrical recording.
  • New format. Cheaper listening, better sound. Radio changed the listening paradigm! Recorded music sales: 1921 - $105 million, 1933 - $6 million. Not until 1945 would the recorded music industry reach $105 million again.
  • Unbreakable vinyl and FM radio led to new outlets for promotion, and new distribution methods that opened the market. Fascinating story! Not going to tell it here...
  • A note on consolidation: Victor and Columbia, in phonographs; NBC/RCA, CBS in radio; Majors in the most recent consolidation.
  • Small files, easily copied, many, many nodes.
  • New Orleans, 2006. The record industry, about the same time. RIAA suits, DCMA takedowns, the Sony rootkit.
  • Meanwhile... Digital services are consolidating into into identity-aware “hyper-giants.” Find the NANOG presentation. Read it. http://www.nanog.org/meetings/nanog47/presentations/Monday/Labovitz_ObserveReport_N47_Mon.pdf
  • Walled gardens. iTunes/iPad/Facebook/Android, etc. Good for rights holders, challenging for fair use.
  • Com546 Final Pres

    1. 1. <ul><li>H. Dean Hudson, UW MCDM </li></ul><ul><li>COM 546, Kathy Gill </li></ul>Music in Disruption
    2. 2. The State of the Art Source: Enders Analysis via: http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2007/04/drm-lock-ins-and-piracy-all-red-herrings-for-a-music-industry-in-trouble.ars
    3. 3. Historical Disruption
    4. 4. http://www.flickr.com/photos/olivander/3038572409/
    5. 5. 1920s: Radio http://www.flickr.com/photos/kt/2008553/
    6. 6. 1945-1955: The Independents http://www.flickr.com/photos/melancon/2900608890/
    7. 7. Features Ignored by incumbents Consolidation around mastery of distribution Suppression via control of IP
    8. 8. Where are we now?
    9. 9. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dr/2048034334/ New Distribution
    10. 10. http://www.flickr.com/photos/demonbaby/2217148687/
    11. 11. http://www.flickr.com/photos/satanslaundromat/475941255/
    12. 12. http://www.flickr.com/photos/yuan2003/1957751715/ Walled Gardens
    13. 13. <ul><li>© H. Dean Hudson 2010, UW MCDM </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] , @deanero, http://ero.com </li></ul><ul><li>COM 546, Kathy Gill </li></ul>All slides Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives Questions? “ Crooked Note” Courtesy of Kyle Thomas, aka “King Tuff”

    ×