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Cae practice tests

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Cae practice tests

  1. 1. Virginia Evans for the revised Cambridge ESOL CAE Examination Express Publishing StUd€nt'S BOOK
  2. 2. Virginia Evans for the revised Cambridge ESOL CAE Examination Students Book % Express Publishing
  3. 3. Published by Express Publishing Liberty House, New Greenham Park, Newbury, Berkshire RG19 GHW Tel: (0044) 1635 817 363 - Fax: (0044) 1635 817 463 e-mail: inquiries@expresspublishing. co. uk http: // www. expresspublishing. co. uk © Virginia Evans, 2009 ‘ Design and Illustration © Express Publishing, 2009 First published 2009 Second impression 2010 Made in EU All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, or by any means, electronic, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publishers. - This book is not meant to be changed in any way. ISBN 978~1-84679-755~2 Acknowledgements We would like to thank all the staff at Express Publishing who have contributed their skills to the production of this book. Thanks for their support and patience are due in particular to: Albert West (Editor in Chief); Antony O'Neill and Alex Baker (senior editors); Stacey Hill and Sally White (editorial assistants); Eric Parson (senior production controller); the Express Publishing design team; Tim Fisher (recording producer); and Ann Morris, Lisa Travis, William Sharp and Eddie Gibson. We would also like to thank those institutions and teachers who piloted the manuscript, and whose comments and ieedback were invaluable in the completion of this book. The authors and publishers also wish to thank the following for their kind permission to adapt copyright material: p 7 from “Notes From a Big Country’, from ‘Notes From a Big Country’ by Bill Bryson, Black Swan 1999, © Bill Bryson 1998; p 9 from ‘My job: Andrew Baker, sports feature writer, Daily Telegraph‘, Press Gazette Journalism Today, 17 September 2007, © 2007-2008 Wilmington Business information; pp 10-11 from ‘unfrozen Tundra’, Time Magazine 25 September 2008, © Time lnc, ; p 12 from ‘Step back in time‘, The Guardian 24 September 2008, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 15 from ‘Malcolm Tait‘s top 10 wildlife books’, The Guardian 16 August 2006, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 19 from ‘Gift of the Nile’, Focus November 1995; p 27 from review ol Wall E, Empire online, (0 Bauer Consumer Media; p 28 from ‘No Courses at RADA are easy‘, vvvv_w. rada. orq; p 29 from ‘A Utopian fantasy’, The Guardian 3 June 2002, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; pp 30-31 from rnérébé dragons’, The Independent 30 October 2004, (0) Independent News and Media Limited 2009; p 32 from ‘Who’s that girl? ‘, The Independent 16 September 2008, © independent News and Media Limited 2009; pp 35-36 from ‘Do try this at home’, The Guardian 13 October 2008, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 39 from ‘Dyslexia “can be identified at one day old”‘, Guardian Weekly 26 August 1999, © copyright Sarah Boseley, The Guardian Weekly; p 4-0 from ‘Antarctic tourism and non-governmental expeditions: a summary of current activities’ 10 May 2000. © Commonwealth of Australia. Used by kind permission; p 4-1 from ‘Flexible answer to life in space’, Focus November 2000; p 49 from ‘What the teachers taught the judges’, The Guardian 13 October 2008, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 50 from ‘Going to work on general English‘, Guardian Weekly/ BBC world service 20 June 1999 © John Hughes, The Guardian Weekly; pp 52-53 from ‘Voluntary service underseas’, Wanderlust February 2007, © Wanderlust; p 54 from ‘Alpha Couple’, Vogue Australia September 2008, © 2008 New Magazines Pty Ltd; p 57 from ‘Daring to be different’, The Guardian 16 April 2005, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 60; p 62 from ‘Penguins in peril‘, The Guardian Weekly 4 April 1999, © The Guardian Weekly; p 70 from ‘Weird or wonderful? A weekly look at alternative therapies’, The Guardian 7 March 2000, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 74 from ‘Thought crime’, The Guardian 23 October 2008, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009' p 77 from ‘The eccentrics guide to London‘, The Guardian 19 November 2008, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009: D 80 from ‘Your get-ahead guide to powerspeak’, Fair Lady 19 July 2000 (0 Fair Lady Magazine; p 90 from ‘l-lire education’, The Guardian 13 August 2007, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 91 from ‘This column will change your life’, The Guardian 15 November 2008, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 92 from 'Aquaseiling: sparkling water, on the rocks’, The Telegraph 18 November 2008, © Telegraph Media Group Limited 2009; p 94 from ‘Season of mists and unwanted guests’, The Guardian 6 October 2002, © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; pp 9798 from ‘Top girls‘ (parts one, two & three)’, The Guardian 30 September 2003. © Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 102 from ‘Take a bough’, Homes and Gardens February 1997 (pp 107-108), © 1997 Homes and Gardens; p 103 from ‘Dubai: hot city seriously cool‘, Fair Lady Inspirations Summer 2000, © Fair Lady Magazine; p 111 from ‘Household robots’, Sciencentral News, 14 June 2007, © Sciencentral 2000-2007; p 113 from ”Chore Wars, ’ where ‘World of Warcraft’ meets toilet cleaner’, cnet News, 19 October 2007, © 2009 CBS Interactive Inc. ; p 114 from ‘On the chilli trail in Assam India’, The Times 15 November 2008, © 2008 Times Newspapers Ltd; p 116 from ‘Ting Tings are looking up for Katie White and Jules De Martino’, The Times 21 November 2008, © 2008 Times Newspapers Ltd. ; p 123 from ‘Office karma’, Fair Lady 12 April 2000, © Fair Lady Magazine; p 124 from ‘Ash Thursday‘, Focus October 1998; Photograph Acknowledgements 1 _ p 27 Wall, from governmentexecutivecom, p 35 isolated Batman image, from iantasy~illustration. com copyright © RABZ Art & illustration, p 93 aquaseiling, www. adventure21.co. uk The authors and publishers are also grateful to the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate for permission to reproduce the sample answer sheets on pages 147- 150 and the information on pages 5-6 in both the Students and Teachers books. Every effort has been made to trace all the copyright holders but it any have been inadvertently overlooked, the publishers will be
  4. 4. COLNTEINTS E Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 5 $AE Vest t 9 Paper 1 - Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 7 Paper 2 - Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 16 Paper 3 — Use of English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ._ . . . . . . . . . .1 . . . . . . . p. 18 Paper 4 - Listening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 23 QAE Test 2 Paper 1 - Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 27 Paper 2 - Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 37 Paper 3 — Use of English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 39 Paper 4 - Listening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 44 SAE Test 3 — ~ Paper 1 - Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 49 Paper 2 - Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 58 Paper 3, - Use ‘of English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 60 Paper 4 ~ Listening . . . . . . . . . . . > . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 65 CAE Test 4 Paper 1 - Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 69 Paper 2 - Writing . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 78 Paper 3 — Use of English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ., . . . . . . . p. 80 Paper 4 - Listening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . p. 85 GAE Test 5 Paper 1 — Fleading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 89 Paper 2 - Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 99 Paper 3 - Use of English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 101 Paper 4 - Listening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 106
  5. 5. fiétfii "test p Paper 1 — Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paper 2 — Writing Paper 3 — Use of English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paper 4 — Listening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Further Exam Practice - Use of English . . . . . . .1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speaking Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sample Answer Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix 1 - Word and Preposition Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '2 — Collocations and Idioms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - Word formation tables . . . . . ‘. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - Punctuation and spelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 — Functional Phrases for the Speaking Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D. p. p. p. P. p. D. p. .111 .121 .123 .128 133 145 157 161 164 166 169 170
  6. 6. CAE Practice Tests contains six complete tests designed to help students to prepare for the University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) examination. The tests offer comprehensive practice in all five papers of the examination and reflect the most recent CAE specifications (introduced for December 2008), thus providing students with the tools to develop the skills required to succeed in this examination and obtain the CAE qualification. CAE Practice Tests includes a wide range of stimulating, authentic texts in examination format, listening texts with authenticated recordings and a variety of accents, and full-colour visual material for the Speaking Paper. The book provides a detailed overview of the CAE examination, with a description of all the sections of each paper, exam guidance sections and further exam practice for Paper 3 — Use of English followed by useful Appendices as well as Sample OMR Answer Sheets at the back of the book. Tests 1-4 contain helpful ~ exam tips and reminders, while Tests 5 and 6 are like real exam papers, with no guidance, for further exam practice. The Teacher’s Book contains all the Student’s Book material, together with over—printed answers, model written answers for the Writing Paper, tapescripts of the recorded material for the Listening Paper, and guidelines for the Speaking Test. In CAE there are five Papers as shown below: About CAE CAE is the fourth level in the Cambridge ESOL five- level series of examinations and is designed to offer an advanced qualification, suitable for those who want to use English for professional or study purposes. The CAE examination can also serve as a useful step in the development of the language skills necessary for the CPE examination. The CAE examination can be used as proof of the language level necessary to work at managerial or professional level or to follow a course of study at Cambridge Level Five Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) ng ish ( V Cambridge Level Three First Certificate in English (FCE) Cambridge Level Two Preliminary English Test (PET) Cambridge Level One Key English Test (KET) university. CAE is recognised by most British universities for English language entrance requirements. eve
  7. 7. PAPER 1 . READING (1 hour 15 mins) This paper has four parts with 34 questions drawn from reading texts which contain about 3,000 words in total. Part 1 Three themed texts with 2 multiple-choice questions on each text. Test focus: detail, opinion, tone, purpose, main idea, implication, attitude, text organisation features, etc Part 2 A gapped text with 6 missing paragraphs. Test focus: text structure, cohesion and coherence Part 3 A text followed by 7 four-option multiple-choice questions. Test focus: detail, opinion, tone, purpose, main idea, implification, attitude, text organisation features Part 4 A text preceded by 15 multiple-matching questions. Test focus: specific information, detail, opinion and attitude PAPER 2 _ WRITING (1 hour 30 mins) This paperhas two parts. Part 1 requires 180-220 words and Part 2 requires 220-260 words. Part 1 One compulsory task based on given input. Test focus: may include evaluating, expressing opinions, hypothesising, justifying, I comparing, recommending, supporting, etc. Tasks will always include an element of persuasion. Part 2 One task from a choice of four. Question 5 is always based on set texts. Test focus: comparing, giving opinions, persuading, justifying, giving advice, describing, evaluating, hypothesising, judging priorities (2 or more of these as specified in task) PAPER 3 USE OF ENGLISH (1 hour) This paper has five parts with a total of 50 questions. Part 1 A multiple-choice cloze of approximately 200 words containing 12 gaps and followed by 12 four-option multiple- choice answers. Test focus: lexico - grammatical/ lexical Part 2 A modified open cloze of approximately 200 words containing 15 gaps. Test focus: grammatical/ lexico ~ grammatical Part 3 One text of up to 130 words each. Words must be formed to complete 10 gaps using the given prompt words. Test focus: lexical/ lexico -— grammatical Part 4 Five sets of 3 sentences with gaps to be completed with the same word. Test focus: lexical Part 5 Eight key word transformation sentences. Test focus: lexical and grammatical PAPER 4 LISTENING This paper has four parts with 30 questions. All parts are heard twice. Part 1 Three short unrelated exchanges with two multiple-choice questions for each. ‘ Test focus: feeling, attitude, opinion, purpose, function, agreement, gist, etc Part 2 A monologue with 8 sentence completion questions. Test focus: specific information, stated opinion Part 3 A conversation between 2 or more speakers with 6 multiple choice questions. Test focus: attitude and opinion Part 4 ' A series of five short extracts with two multiple matching tasks. Test focus: gist, attitude, main points, interpreting context PAPER 5 SPEAKING (Approximately 15 minutes) This paper ‘contains four parts, and is taken by the candidates in pairs withtwo examiners present. One of the examiners acts as Interlocutor and the other one as Assessor. Part 1 A conversation between the Interlocutor and each candidate. Test focus: general interactional and social language Part 2 ' Individual 1 minute ‘long turn’ for each candidate with brief 30 second response from 2nd candidate. Each candidate is given 3 visual stimuli with questions. Test focus: organising a larger unit of discourse, comparing, describing, expressing opinions, speculating Part 3 Two-way conversation between the candidates. The candidates are given spoken instructions with written and visual stimuli, which are used in a decision-making task. Test focus: exchanging ideas, expressing and justifying opinions, agreeing and/ or disagreeing, suggesting, speculating, reaching a decision through negotiation, etc Part 4 A conversation between the candidates and the Interlocutor related to the topic introduced in Part 3. Test focus: expressing and justifying opinions, agreeing and/ or disagreeing (Approximately 40 minutesl
  8. 8. PART 1 (1 hour 15 minutes) You are going to read three extracts which are all concerned in some way with sports. For questions 1-6, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fits best according to the Don’t forget that ‘ text three of the answers are there to distract you from the correct one. There may be 9. small but significant differences in meaning in the answer sentences so read carefully and make sure you understand how . . one sentence differs 91,, from another. A V tat, aging they now hurtle down at speeds reaching - ' h 115 km/ h). And to make it even sparkle and you teellthe need t: trki)sekjlifSet Zgogprisiy the use of brakes is strictly and limb then street ugmg mlg . i ’ . re not ashamed - ' b dd ! These riders a _ . the sport for you! Ffirstfia cgthiiiéirnitrilgt trgrtgkeegleasure in risking everythmg In —this is notasport or e a r ' buzz. , to pursuit of an adrenalin if you do feel you have the courage . ' howthey stop , , . .- 1 You mightbewonderin9_ ? A glvenawhmmsboundtogetyourpuse before they hit that brick wall that H :1 racing. . . - ' . t s eeds usuallsl ‘WV 599” 5} A J‘ Street mgmg bears “film Yemen dowtii Cc: Fr)1prrr? c:tt<3>rr‘vev: ):? F/ )Vell, it’s down to Qraviiv ‘° , wintry counterpart. ice Uglngv 3“ . f leather or Kevlar ~ (,1 a sturdy pair 0 probably never be recognised as an an . , . ’ve heard of Kevlar — ‘ Ol m lo s on. Street luge riders lie down boots. Perhaps Y0” ‘ Wests are [me 30 y p hp’ b ks and try to steer a it's the material that bullet DYOO «: - flat on t eir .30 . - - - . Th‘ ‘ a sport that. as long 33 streetluge board, which lS very similar rt: gioajdzfrtvive I: are able to ‘Nam away A the good dd Skaéeboa-rg'¥h:0f: ;tufrilger with no broken bones, will have you too hazardous, oes I . I I . back “more! comes from the steep, winding road that COmll'lQ it the traditional sports are losing their According to the writer, street luge riders A believe the sport should be acknowledged at an international level. B have seen the sport become progressively more dangerous. C seem to thrive on the danger involved in the sport. D believe the sport is often unfairly labeled as too dangerous. 2 Why does the writer mention bullet—proof vests (line 30)? A to show what is needed to stop when moving at high speed A B to recommend clothing suitable for street luging C to reassure readers that street luging is safe D to emphasise the risks the riders are taking . r’” -~. ... .., ... ... ... ywnou ,5. . , . , , . +"‘
  9. 9. T PART 1 People sometimes ask me, ‘What is The difference between baseball and cricket? ’ The answer is simple. .BoTh are games of great skill involving balls and bats, but with This crucial difference; baseball is exciting and when you go home at The end of. fhe day you know who won. I'm joking, of course. Cricket is a wonderful game, full of deliciously scattered micro-moments of real action. if a doctor ever instructs me To Take a complete rest and not get over-excited, i shall become a fan at once. in The meantime, however, i hope you will understand when i tell you that my heart belongs To baseball. its what i grew up with, what I played as a boy and that of course is vital to any meaningful appreciation of a sport. I had This brought home To me many years ago in England when i went out onto a football pitch with a couple of guys To knock a ball around. i had watched football on TV and Thought I had a fair idea of what was required, so when one of Them lofted a ball in my direction, I decided To flick if casually info The net with my head, The way I had seen Kevin Keegan do if. lThoughT That it would be like heading a beachball ~ That there would be a gentle ‘ponk’ sound and that The ball would lightly leave my brow and drift in a pleasing arc into The net. But of course if was like heading a bowling ball. l have never felt anything so startlingly not like I thought if would feel. i walked around for four hours on wobbly legs with a big red circle and The word MITRE imprinted on my forehead, and vowed never again To do anything so foolish and painful. hV"“"'-= sr, ~. pi‘: 3 The writer compares baseball and cricket in order to A explain his preference for one over the other. 8 emphasise the pointlessness of cricket. C show how different they are to each other. D explain his reasons for liking them. 4 The writer believes that he once had a bad experience while playing football because A his expectations of playing differed to the reality of it. B he chose to head the ball instead of kicking it. C he had overestimated his sporting talent. D his opponents didn’t take into account his lack of experience.
  10. 10. To be a successful sports journalist, you need V the same curiosity, perseverance and literacy as _ any other journalist, but also specialist knowledge if you wish to cover one sport in particular; ‘ diplomacy and humility if you need to cover many sports (you will need to ask a lot of questions). Also, the ability to write sensibly under extreme pressure is essential if you aspire to cover major events live. What's it like being a sports feature writer on a national newspaper? Andrew Baker shares his experience of sports journalism. it isn't necessary to hold a journalism degree, but a degree of some kind is beneficial, because you will have experience of marshalling your thoughts under pressure. in an ideal world, all journalists would have an essay-based degree and a postgraduate course in journalism, especially important for knowing the nuts and bolts of sub-editing and how to avoid legalhowlers. Perhaps the best part of being a sports journalist is travelling to interesting places and meeting interesting people. Often, these are not the PR-protected megastars, but the passionate individuals who can tell you what is so special about their sport and, if you are lucky, give you some first—hand experience. in my case, I've messed about on Ellen MacArthur’s boat at 3am in a Brazilian harbour, had a special driving lesson from an F1 star and done a lot more fun stuff that had better not be recorded. ’ 5 According to the writer, one of the main benefits of obtaining a qualification in journalism is A becoming skilled in writing good quality essays. B learning how to express ideas quickly and clearly. C gaining knowledge of the practical details of journalism. D learning how to deal with the stress associated with journalism. 6 "What aspect of sports journalism is the writer emphasising in the third paragraph? A the chance to meet famous people B the necessity of personal participation C the satisfaction gained from contact with enthusiasts D the fervour and dedication of some people he meets
  11. 11. PART 2 You are going to read an extract from a magazine article. Six paragraphs have been removed from the extract. Choose USE. From 30,000 ft. in the air, the Greenland ice cap seems impregnable, nearly 800 trillion gallons of frozen water locked safely away. But get closer and the cracks begin to emerge. Dancing by helicopter above the mouth of the Jakobshavn Glacier, near the western coast of Greenland, you can make out veins of. the purest blue melt water running between folds of ice. — Those icebergs are spat out into Disko Bay, 20 billion metric tons‘ worth every year, where they loom above the tiny fishing boats that ply these deep, cold waters. Sail close and you'll find that these seemingly permanent cathedrals of ice, some 200 ft. to 300 ft. high, are leaking water like broken pipes. They're fighting a war and they appear to be losing. If all the ice on Greenland were to melt tomorrow, is global sea levels would rise more than 20 ft. — enough to swamp many coastal cities. Though no one thinks that will happen anytime soon, what keeps glaciologists awake at night is that thinking is not the same as knowing — and no one can say with certainty what Green| and's fate will be. I got a firsthand look at such heroism this summer when I joined a team of international researchers led by from the paragraphs A-G the one which fits each gap (7-12). There is one extra paragraph which you do not need to Dahl-Jensen at the NEEM camp in Greenland. NEEM stands for North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (the ‘ acronym is Danish, as are the leaders of the project), and the scientists are digging deep into the Greenland ice — more than a mile and a half deep to be precise — to try to understand its pedigree. ‘ It's like tree rings but for climatic history. "In order to predict the future, we have to understand the past, " says Minik Rosing, a geologist at the University of Copenhagen. NEEM is focused on the Eemian stage, a ~ period from about.115,000 to 130,000 years ago, right _ before the last ice age, when the world was warm — quite warm, about 9"F hotter in Europe than it is today. Dahl-Jensen believes that with enough information, they will be able to project forward and understand just how vulnerable Greenland is to future melting. "With 10 years of intense research, I think we can reach a reliable estimate for that tipping point, " she says. — I watch as a plume of mist fills the air where the ‘ J iceberg once was, while the fjord churns on. And then I wonder, just how much time do Greenland and the rest f, of us have before it's too late? That may be up to us - and the heroes we choose to follow.
  12. 12. A Given that the U. N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that temperatures could rise 3.24°F to 7.2°F over the coming century, the Eemian could offer a model for the effect such thermometer swings will have on Greenland's ice. A full climatic record of the Eemian has never been constructed, but over the next several summers, the NEEM researchers hope to harvest cores that will help them track the state of the ice throughout that era, when Greenland was warm enough to actually be green. Depth is time, and the lower you go, the further back in history you travel. As ice formed in Greenland, year after cold year, bits of atmosphere were trapped in the layers. Drilling into the ice and fishing out samples — ice cores — that contain tiny bubbles of that ancient air can reveal the temperature, the concentration of greenhouse gases, even the ambient dust from the year that layer was formed. It's easy to misunderstand all of this. Climate change itself isn't a bad thing; it isn't even unusual. Take a geological step back, and you can see that our climate has always changed, alternating just within the past several hundred thousand years between ice ages, when glaciers covered much of the Northern Hemisphere, to eras warmer than our own. That's why researchers like Dorthe Dahl- Jensen, stationed on a barren speck of land near the heart of Greenland's ice sheet, are considered a hero for the environment. His work there involves decoding the island's climatic history. He, . along with numerous other scientists, activists, financiers and political leaders display a passion for the planet that just * might save it. It's that type of confidence that serves as our light in the climatic darkness, living proof that hope~hasn't vanished. You need that comfort when you're standing _ on a rocky hilltop in Greenland, watching , the ice disappear. As Jakobshavn gives way to the fjord, a stadium—size iceberg suddenly implodes, disintegrating like a collapsing skyscraper. What you can't see from that height, is ‘ Jakobshavn's inexorable slide toward the sea at 65 ft. to 115 ft. a day — an alarming rate that has accelerated in M . recent years. As the glacier nears the ; ~ coast, it breaks off into the Ilulissat . ~ fjord, a stream of churning ice that might have birthed the monster that sunk the Titanic. Sadly, Greenland is the front line in humanity's battle against climate change. The warming that is easy to dismiss elsewhere is undeniable on this 860,000-sq. -mi. island of fewer than 60,000 people. More and more -of Greenland, whose frozen expanses are a living remnant of the last ice age, disappears each year, with as much as 150 billion metric tons of glacier vanishing annually. Look for any grammatical or logical clues which can help you place the missing paragraphs in the right gaps.
  13. 13. P PART 3 You are going to read a magazine article. For questions 13-19, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fits best according to the text. , -.. ... ... .. . .1.2,, Ii. e2l top back in ‘ Historical biographer Antonia Fraser reveals the pleasures of studying a bygone era. " I Gibbon was inspired to write The Decline and Fall of of Dr Johnson's wise dictum: "A man will turn over half a V’ the Roman Empire sitting on the steps of the Capitol at Rome one evening, listening to the sound of monks chanting. My own inspiration to become a historical biographer came in rather less elevated circumstances, as a teenager one rainy Oxford afternoon: I began to read Lytton Strachey's EminentVictorians, and was in particular fascinated by his essay on Cardinal Manning. This was going to be the life for me! Once back at school I plunged into further research in the library. A very different picture emerged. Gradually as I pursued the topic, I became aware o‘f Strachey's daring sallieslinto "artistic truth" (as opposed to historical truth). Nevertheless I never forgot my original sense of being transported into a world more vivid than my own. An ability to convey this sensation is, I believe, at the heart of the matter. If you, the biographer, don't thrill to your subject, you can hardly in all fairness expect the reader to do so. In a sense (not of course the commercial sense) the choice of subject is irrelevant so long as it meets that requirement. You could say that I was extremely lucky to choose Mary Queen of Scots for my first foray since there proved to be a world-wide public for the troubles of the ill-fated Queen. But you could argue equally that I made my own luck. since I had always been obsessed by Mary's story from childhood. Nor was success fore- ordained. It was, after all, the leading publisher Mark Bonham—Carter of (then) Collins who said to me when I confessed my project, "They say that all books on Mary Queen of Scots sell and no books on South America do", before adding with a laugh, "Perhaps yours will be the exception. " Nevertheless I did have luck. In the 605, so-called narrative biography was said to be out of fashion. Mary Queen of Scots was an early beneficiary from the fact that the public continued to have an appetite for it, so long as the research was felt to be solid. The actual research for a biography — now that's a whole other matter. The paramount need for it - historical truth mt 5t'”3Che)’eSC| ue truth must be established ~ means that biographers discover for themselves the reality library to make a book. " And what about those fabled things boasted of on blurbs: hitherto unpublished documents? Obviously it is every researcher's dream to discover such papers, and their discovery once again may makea project commercial which would not otherwise be so. At the same time I would issue a caveat about hitherto unpublished documents. HUDs are not in themselves more valuable than the printed sources — it's a historical coincidence that one set has become known early on, the other not. One needs to evaluate them even more closely. Here I speak from personal experience. A series of chances led me to discovering some hitherto unpublished letters of Oliver Cromwell just as I was finishing my manuscript. I blazoned my finds across the text: only to realise at the proof stage, that they might be unpublished but they were not very important in the grand scheme of things an expensive mistake. Where the perils and pleasures of writing historical biography are concerned, there are two perils which seem to me to raise points of princip| e.The first is the peril of anachronistic judgements. For exampIe, in the |6th century line 6 more or less everybody took astrology seriously and more or less everybody enjoyed a jolly afternoon out to see the bears baited. It's no good dismissing the former as meaningless and cringing from the latter as disgusting. I would further cite the peril of hindsight. We may know that Henry VIII will marry six times, but he didn't, and he would have been amazed if it had been predicted at the time of his first marriage to Catherine of Aragon. And the pleasures? Manifold! Principal among them however is the opportunity to lead a life less ordinary. As a biographer, I can rule i over kingdoms, lead the ' cavalry into battle, patronise the great artists of the past and all without leaving my chair.
  14. 14. in N __WH WW_W_W_, _W, ,_, ,,_, _,_A, ,__ _. ..-_. .,, . rm, _, _,__. .m. ,.. . M. .M. .~. ,W. .__. ,,. ._. ,.. ... .,. _,. -.. _s. , . _.. ... i I l l 13 What did the writer learn while researching a historical figure as a teenager? A There was a surprising amount of information available. E B It was not possible to take everything she read as fact. C It was difficult to interpret the true meaning of what she read. D’ it was necessary to consult a wide range of sources. Read the text extremely carefully in order to distinguish between as we : apparently similar viewpoints, 14 What does ‘that requirement’ in line 21 refer to? °“t°°”‘e5 0' A the reader's response to a writer’s subject reasons. B the correct choice of subject C the commercial appeal of the book D the writer’s ability to communicate their enthusiasm 15 What did Mark Bonham-Carter believe about the writer’s choice of subject? ifix‘-’ ' 2 A Her long-standing interest in it may ensure her book’s success. B it did not guarantee her books success. C There are already too many books written on it. D It was a wise choice for her first biography. 16 The main point that the writer is making in the fourth paragraph is that A a biography is more likely to be successful if it contains new information. B researchers must be careful to check all facts thoroughly. C research material can include inaccurate information. D extensive reading is crucially important. . .V _n. ... ..”. .m. s.v. $.. .n. .;»~av= ;:mg= ;=as: :s1*zas. s«z$: z: §}'{_’§"a? T‘. "'3-'. ‘.f§“;92XVe2IT: ‘.E‘: rx; rw3a<u*-*? =fi mam-—w—-~< 17 What warning does the writer give to biographers about unpublished documents? A They are difficult to obtain as their discovery is down to chance. B Their overall significance to the book must be carefully considered. C Their use could result in diminished commercial success for a book. D It should not be assumed that they are authentic. 18 An example of an ‘anachronistic judgement’ (line 64) that the writer gives is A not being able to imagine oneself living in the sixteenth century. B being uninformed about sixteenth century customs and practices. 5 C viewing the sixteenth century from a twenty-first century perspective. D focusing only on the negative side of life in the sixteenth century. 19 in the article as a whole, the writer implies that her main motivation for becoming an historical biographer was the chance to A carry out extensive research. B become immersed in history. C discover unpublished documents. D establish historical truth. i M lmlE: tswaswmwmm. u«m. w W ~-W. ’
  15. 15. PART4 You are going to read some reviews of wildlife books. For questions 20-34, choose from the reviews (A-G). The reviews may be chosen more than once. Read the questions ‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘‘ —_. ___‘wM‘_”_.7mW'W_”_wW_m'"___«___ ’__________*__’_____« «v a: a%Mr. §€Gfifl§31.. i first and underline j"* $: tk; guV; ’:: :‘: 50 In which review are the following mentioned? ggfifléfififimgg are. feelings of inadequacy in relation to others _ . . A . . B _ N . , . . . M _ _ W _ . . . _ . _ B . ~ _ , M . , _ . . . . . _ , . . . _ _ » ” . _ _ M _ . _ _ . , _ . . . . _ . _ V N . A c . . . , c . m . , . . . A . ” V A M _ . ~ . . . . . V . . the fact that the reviewer does not apologise for selecting the book i__—Li-i: i , a failure to respond sufficiently to an appeal iii: gs . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... . . - § ‘i . » . the fact that an author openly reveals details of a personal nature Em l i E _t--. ---s_--. --t. .----_-. ._--_---__-_-----_-_--_-____--------, --_t--_--------- readers being able to identify with an author’s line of thinking - 7 an author’s successful exploration of the most central aspects , of a matter the successful portrayal of an instinctive connection an ignorance of deeper meanings, which later became apparent a well-organised and aesthetically pleasing book a reviewer‘s changed reaction to a creature since reading the book the book provokes a reaction even if readers’ opinions differ from those of the author’s r @ a suggestion that a book was not an obvious choice for a reviewer i an author rekindling a lost closeness with the natural world iii: an assurance that knowledge acquired will enhance a reader’s , appreciation of nature V ‘ multiple descriptions of the same thing i"‘msz w~~ ~—— ~~-~ ~ - —— ~—- _. -.
  16. 16. Malcolm Tait, editor of Going, Going, Gone? , an illustrated compilation of 100 animals and plants in danger of extinction, reviews his favourite wildlife books. A: Nature Cure by Richard Mabey If the best wildlife writing reveals as much about the writer as the wildlife itself, then this is the best of them all. Mabey is brutally . frank and honest about his own life, his depression, and his fear that nature may no longer hold the answers for him. The more he tries to engage with it, the more disconnected from the world he feels. But the book charts his path out of despair, as he finds a ’ way to let nature back in and fire up the wild bits of his imagination. It's a fascinating book, written in Mabey's richly evocative language, and it's painful too: probably the best -‘ understanding of 'biophilia', mankind's innate relationship with nature, out there. 8: The jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling Kipling, I think, was where much of it began for me. I adored his animal tales as a lad, such as the idiosyncratic, rocking-chair-by- the—fireside fables of the Just -30 Stories and the heroic and suspense-filled Rikki—tikki—tavi. But it was The Jungle Book that really gripped me, a rite of passage yarn in which the vicissitudes of life were represented by the forces of nature. Of course, I didn't understand all this at thetime — ljust loved reading about Baloo, Bagheera and all and singing along to the songs of the Disney version -— but I now realise that I grew up with Mowgli, and that I've been going back to the jungle ever since. C: How to be a Bad Birdwatcher by Simon Barnes You know the feeling: you're reading a book, and as you turn every page you're nodding in agreement, as if the writer has popped into your head and committed your own thoughts to paper. This is one of those books. It's about being a normal birdwatcher, reasonably knowledgeable, constantly passionate, but often a bit confused as to what you've seen or heard, and with the vague feeling that everyone else you're with knows so much more. It's the book for those of us who find birdwatching pleasurable, not competitive, and it's terribly funny to boot. I always smile, now, when I see a sparrowhawk. I urge you to read this book to find out why. D: Field Guide to the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Great Britain and Northern Ireland by Steve Brooks and Richard Lewington You can't have a list of wildlife books without including a guide book. I've gone for this excellent little number, partly because it's clearly written and well laid out, partly because it's superbly illustrated, but mainly because a whole new world has opened up for me since buying it. If you've never looked closely at nature before, this book will set you in the right direction, and I guarantee that as you get to know these fascinating creatures you'll have new marvels to understand and enjoy every time you take a summer walk. E: The Future of Life by E0 Wilson Here's a fascinating book which is a great example of conserv;1tion~based writing. The ecological debate will always rage on — should mankind continue to experiment with new sciences and discoveries, or are we destroying our world and ourselves in the process - and Wilson gets to the heart of the arguments superbly, driven by a constant love of the animals with which we share the planet. Agree with him or not, he's a stimulating writer and this is a stimulating book. F: The World's Vanishing Animals by Cyril Littlewood and DW Ovenden An unashamedly nostalgicchoice. Published in two volumes (mammals and birds) in 1969, this was my introduction to the idea that extinction wasn't just for dinosaurs and dodos. I used to pore over Denys Ovenden's illustrations of familiar polar bears and black rhinos, and less familiar takahes and nyalas, and wonder whether I could do anything to help. Published by the Wildlife Youth Service, part of Peter Scott's WWF, it was a call to action for young folk. Trouble is, we haven't fully listened to it. The book’s dustjacket records that about 1,000 animal species were faced with extinction at time of publication: today, the World Conservation Union's Red List of animals about which to be concerned contains over 16,000 entries. G: The Peregrine by JA Baker The last in my list is, perhaps oddly, a book I haven't yet read. I've included it because I've only recently heard about it, I can't wait to read it, and I don't see why I can't find something new in this list, as well as you. By all accounts, the book is a reminder of the wildness of England (it was published in 1967), and a tour de force of language as Baker explains over and over again, yet grippingly and compellingly, the daily hunts of a local falcon. Sounds superb.
  17. 17. iwamu T PART 1 (1 hour 30 mins) You must answer this question. Write your answer in 180-220 words in an appropriate style. Bah parts °l Paper 2 1 You are a student at an International school. The principal of the school is looking for a take the Same venue for this year’s end—of-term party and has asked you to write a proposal suggesting number of marks, so a suitable one. spend the same _ . Read the memo below, on which you have made some notes, the notes you made after length of time on hearing students’ comments about last year’s party and the advertisements for two possible each one‘ venues. Then, using the information appropriately, write your proposal for the principal, explaining why you think a different venue should be chosen this year, recommending one of the venues in the advertisements and explaining why it may cost more this year. ‘:3 Thank. gov for 351’? /oln5_’l'o help with the organisation of this a1ear'€ onol—of—f'own partly. Covlol l10lI ‘l'6l l Mt’/ l Wl’l8’l’ ’l‘l’l6 §'i"lIal&il’l'€ ‘l’l’lOlJ5lr Notes from Students: of last l1oar'§ parity? Covlal we rice the game comments I/ GHV5 again this near? Or perhaps one of 'l'lno venue; in the aolvorrlcomentg I ’ve af“faohoal “H would be more Cvlfable? 0 not enough food ~ only nibbles! ' I hotel DJ’s music unorlginal Aka, olo i1ov think that am? additional finance; , movie stars» theme will be Voqylroal for this I1oar'€ wont? Successful Yes, probably. (give reasons) .2~‘<_'A 0 hotel venue a bit formal/ impersonal Thank qev again. Fafor Hammond (School Principal) », ww-. vw»«mma-wwi. xi. ..««. e- .1 . . . Need a venue for a reception, ‘ * . .1 . l I ~; p.pElI’aCl15C . 3 all) ii conference or party? l l aeachside Ni9"*°'"'? & “°? ‘*’”l”"l. . ‘( . ._l/ Vye . otferm_hoi or. cold, 7bullel, .. resident. .DJ, = ‘special, price tor early bookings new ‘Hawaiian, g F d, ‘_Q‘fi" requ_éSt. E y . Available for hire UQW i°' . , garbequ‘e' , ‘nlght. l_give_ban Write your proposal. You should use your own words as far as possible.
  18. 18. PART 2 Write an answer to one of the of the questions 2-5 in this part. Write your answer in 220-260 words in an appropriate style. Exam . ,,Tip_, i Make sure you have covered all the points from the question in your answer. 2 You see the following announcement in a music magazine: nttnnounni We are researching for a special feature for our magazine about the influence music has on individuals and on society. If you are interested in helping us, please write to us answering the following questions: . . . . i . 0 How important is music in your lite? one YEAR 0“ UBSGRIPTI , '2', ‘§§§a BEST ENTRY! 0 . How does music influence the world . in which we live? I What would the world be like without music? Write your competition entry. 3 An international travel magazine has asked its readers to send in a review of two popular tourist attractions in their country. Write your review in which you compare the two attractions, describing what each has to offer and saying which one you would recommend for a family with children and why. Write your review. ‘ liiir Future tllliirlii We are planning to publish a new book about technology and its role in the future of our world. ll you would like to contribute to the book, write to us, telling us: in what main ways you think technology will change our world in the nexl lilty years. _ what the advantages and disadvantages of these changes will be. . . MM’ Write your contribution to the book. i i 5 Answer one of the following two questions based on one of the books you have read. (a) Write a review of the book for your college magazine saying why people should or shouldn’t read it. (b) Choose one character in the book and write an essay about how this person changes in the book and why. ‘l7i «'M>. '¢'. ‘A~. "<«: ;.. ;,n5.2‘: ,: r.r. __« . i,. ,.. ._. ... _ . .~. ,..
  19. 19. ..1.8,. . «PART 1 (1 hour) each gap. There is an example at the beginning (0). process Exam Remember that all four options could be similar in meaning, but only one can be used in the context. 0 A method C way D procedure The (0) . ..P. '.'.99§§§. ... of making rain is simpler than you might think. As warm, moisture-laden air (1) from the surface of the earth, it cools and some of the air (2) into tiny droplets that eventually become clouds. These droplets form around the microscopic particles such as dust and smoke which are (3) in the air. The science of weather modification is now big (4) Using radar and sensitive equipment that (5) atmospheric changes, weather modifiers fly above or below the clouds and spray them with billions of 51‘ minute particles known as seeding agents. These particles either fall into clouds or are wafted into them from below by warm (6) . They then ‘attract’ tiny water droplets which (7) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. around each one. When enough droplets are attached, precipitation —— the third and final (8) . water to the earth’s surface ~ occurs, and it rains. It may take as many as a million droplets to form a single raindrop. If the in the process which returns clouds contain ice crystals, the results are similar, but now snow will form instead of rain. Current weather manipulation technology only allows scientists to ‘encourage’ a cloud that is (9) heavy to produce rain. Some more ambitious scientists (10) a day when theywill be able to (11) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. rain from blue skies, but this is still in the far (12) future. 1 A grows B raises C lifts D rises 2 A condenses B evaporates C transforms D gathers 3 A gliding B flying C floating D hanging 4 A commerce B industry C trade D business 5 A takes off B picks up C catches on D puts across 6 A flows 8 draughts C currents D tides 7 A gather B fasten C converge D stick 8 A division B stage C period D level 9 A sufficiently B specifically C splendidly D satisfactorily 10 A forecast B prophesy C guess D foresee 11 A manufacture B supply C conjure D reveal 12 A detached B distant C isolated D remote For questions 1-12, read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits i'i‘I"‘>‘: i‘7,r, v I
  20. 20. ZRART 2 For questions 13-37, read the text below and think of the word which best fits each gap. Use only one word in each gap. There is an example at the beginning (0). Bear in mind the Ex ' = general sense of the amp 6 E T0 Q passage in order to decide What e ‘ oic: W.: !u'=3'st§w1»'«i: ::*r: M~>vlII: »4rA; ~.r4>verxns-wtzeuvwew¢I4aa'¢4am: r:*‘»»»msiIvn¢z»A~* = ava. «.‘m. -Aa. a.m. ..w. m». -.w. mm~w-mwanW. .m. ~--r. -=-m. ..w. ... .., v-I - nv, n7<i<rr' , ,-H. ..» a. am. .,. ~. M . m:tt‘, !.: s7:§{ missing words are. . ,. ism . V V nir'mr5aa M "4 ‘. some of them may I I‘ ‘L 1.‘ 0 NILE RIVER BASIN _ _ _u' ' -- , “ -‘ ' o snmroalrss , r fit grammatically, . we‘ ’°‘“’“‘ at mriowucmrus r r ‘ ————MMoIIoAus 1 but may not make , ., i 1 . , a. :-= ; 5 - ~ nse in the nt xt. » . :~~-. r-. :.~. -.~. -:: ~;~, ~.: :.-— :2 Se co e The Nile allowed the first Egyptians (0) settle grgeiifpi . 5-1*? ’-z-": -'":1'“~¢‘»7€‘~”; :"""""“= **' 3 .91 V successfully in the otherwise very dry part of North Ashum . _ . i RABIA Africa. The great IIVCI provided a dependable source : ; mp (13) water thatwas used for eve hin from irri ation, trans ort, cookin B 8 P E - -. REROF '9" , YEMEN drinking, hunting and fishing (14) waste disposal. (15) its _ river, Egypt would have been no more than an unforgiving desert. Instead, it became the most ; : fertile land in the whole Mediterranean. (16) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. to its position and many natural resources, Egypt was able to remain an independent country for 3,000 years. ‘ (17) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. the deserts were used ‘ for their valuable minerals, they were uninhabitable. The narrowness of the belts of fertile land on -'2 (18) side of the Nile prevented expansion (19) the east or west. Villages were situated (20) the river (21) beads on a thread. , Agriculture in ancient Egypt relied completely on the annual flooding between July and October. (22) flood waters cleaned the land and laid down a thick layer of highly fertile silt. (23) an added bonus, fish were left in the fields (24) the water levels had fallen, and they were dried and smoked for future consumption. As Egypt relied totally on the Nile, it is (25) surprising that the water level was closely watched at (26) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. times. Too high, and the water would flood the towns; too low, and there would be food shortages, unrest, and perhaps (27) the downfall ofa dynasty.
  21. 21. PART 3 For questions 28-37, read the text below. Use the word given in capitals at the end of some of the lines to form a word that fits in the gap in the same line. There is an example at the First identify what part beginning (0). of speech is given as a prompt word and then think about what Example‘ E EXPANSION sort of change(s) you need to make. ET Edit. .. WE $flLE. .EGE Teachng Vacancies Due to the (0) of our sixth form department, we are currently 1 ' EXPAND recruiting teachers with a(n) (28) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. in ‘A’ level Physical 7 SPECIAL Education, Psychology, Law or Ltalian, or a (29) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. of ii . COMBINE these. M St Hilda’s College is a(n) (30) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. day school for girls with ‘ DEPEND . a mission to provide high-quality (31) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. education to ’ SECOND pupils aged eleven to eighteen. ' Applicants should, have a(n) (32) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. track record in j PROVE teaching at ‘A’ level, although we would also welcome applications from (33) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. qualified teachers. Experience in the development : NEW and delivery of (34) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. curriculum programmes would bea ~ 3 INNOVATE distinct advantage. ’ ' It is highly (35) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. that applicants should be self—starters as ‘ DESIRE well as team players and (36) . ... ... ... ... ... ... . . ... ... ... .. . . to participate in extra— ~ WILL curricular activities. For further information and an application form, please ' contact Mrs Jessica Beaumont on: 0208~427—7721. The (37) . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. date for applications is May 15th.
  22. 22. I§s. ~.sa. .a: >.~. «-wmr, w.~w. r.-. ..A, A._. ,. ... e«, ..». ..~. ... ... .-. .., . -_. _.. ._»—. ».. . . ... ..4. PART 4 For questions 38-42 think of one word only which can be used appropriately in all three 9 sentences. Here is an example (0). Read sentences 0 She commented that it was about . ... .. . ... .. . . she started helping more around very carefully because there The house. will be Clues People’s eating habits have drastically changed over . ... .. . ..t. ".’I7.‘. ‘-T . ... .. . . . regarding We took . ... .. . .l. I!? .7.§ . ... .. . . to stop and admire the view on our journey. meaning and word class. E*amP'e= N 38 I can’t buy any new clothes at the moment; l’m completely . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. . The vase . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. after the cat knocked it off the shelf. Tim lost everything when his company went . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. . 39 Eventually it . ... ... ... . . ... ... .. . . out t9 be a beautiful day. Brian . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. to his father for support after his terrible accident. Sorry about your T-shirt; it . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. green in the wash! 40 Sally wasn’t . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. whether she would be going to the party or not. I expected John to call me that night and . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. enough, he did. Be . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. to lock the door when you leave the house. 41 Apparently, Jim and Mary's house is . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. twice what it was when they bought it. He told her that it wasn’t . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. getting so upset over something so small. The storm caused thousands of pounds’ . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. of damage to people’s homes. 42 The noise had been getting on Samantha’s . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. all morning. Tom often goes jogging to calm his . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. before making a presentation. He damaged some of the . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. in his hand in the accident.
  23. 23. }i>fI? ART 5 if your idea '* ' mvwmw~. w.wwmwm. m.w For. questions 43-50 complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between three and six words, including the word given. Here is an example (0). doesn‘t fit . _ naturany into 3_6 0 He always gives the impression that he’s very confident. words, don’t ACROSS force it. its He always . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. very confident. probably wrong. Example: 0 COMES ACROSS AS BEING r: . 0 . _~: i 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 I'm sure Sarah didn‘t mean to hurt your feelings. INTENTION l’m sure Sarah . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. your feelings. Andrew’s behaviour was unforgivable. EXCUSE There‘s . ... ... ... ... .. .'. .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... . . . Andrew behaved. We need the public’s support for the project to work. SUCCEED Whether the project . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. . . on the public’s support. I usually drink a cup of coffee first thing in the morning. HABIT ‘ I am . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... . . . a cup of coffee first thing in the morning. ‘Why don’t you go to the dentist's, Steve? ‘ said his wife. SUGGESTED Steve's wife . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. to the dentist’s. Could you please pass me my book? KIND Would . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. as to pass me my book? There isn’t much chance that Sue will win the race. PROSPECTS Sue’s . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... . . . quite slim. Ken’s lies completely deceived me. ; TAKEN I . ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. Ken’s lies. ~< "IW'<4 v. —. . r
  24. 24. fiisivisneaiaaréivmvansa rrrsw1~<m»si,1.‘, ..Mw: _:ae—e; »x. Cm u . ~=-. Read through the questions very carefully before you listen and think about what you are being asked to listen for e. g. the speaker's purpose, attitudes & opinions or what two speakers agree on. l l PART 1 {Approximately 40 minutes) You will hear three different extracts. For questions 1-6, choose the answer (A, B or C) which fits best agording to what you hear. There are two questions for each extract. E EXTRACT 1 Greg Vanderbilt in it. 1 What is the woman’s opinion of Greg Vanderbilt’s role in the film? A She thinks it shows how adaptable he is as an actor. B She believes it reflects his true talent. ' C She wonders if he was wrongly cast. 2 What do the two speakers agree about? A the originality of the script B the unpredictability of the ending C the complexity of the plot EXTRACT 2 ‘ 3 Why did Jenny give up her athletic career? A She felt it was the right move at the right time. B She was keen to fulfill another ambition. C She had sustained too many injuries to continue. .4 Regarding the way she exercises now, Jenny feels A somewhat anxious about putting on weight. B content with a gentler, more private kind of workout. C committed to staying as fit and healthy as she was. EXTRACT 3 You hear a‘ radio discussion in which two writers are talking about their careers. 5 What does the man say about the short stories he used to write’? A They were not intended for a wide audience. B They weren’t well received by the critics. C They helped to kick—start his career. 6 What do the two speakers agree about? A Their success as novelists is mainly down to lucky breaks. B Other jobs have given them valuable experience. C Their income as writers is not dependable. You hear two people on a radio programme talking about a new film with the actor You hear part of an interview with a former athlete called Jenny Price. mt w H. >_': :.57-5Z§, T.§'_'[{‘_L“'. ‘~Z"<e‘. i?: :?T3—'33'~’~“'7’3‘3”’”‘” " """""""""""‘” """'”'”"“""' EC] E13
  25. 25. A iwmv-. -.w». .~. ,l. ~,~, "PART 2 You’ll hear an artist called Freya Norton talking about her work. For questions 7-14, complete the sentences. You will be able to read and listen to the instructions. They will give you a good idea of the context of the recorded information and also explain the listening task. Freya recalls thatat school not only did she the aajitaclass’ buts I is T ere Freya of an incident that happened in her art class. 2 e s _ Q A ‘ _ A The artist‘Rolf Harris’ : |E| was -a greatinspiratlon to Freya. Freya tellsof musician who based his on paintings by Edward Hopper. Freya says that she feels that her is like a retreat that she can escape to. Freya says that she has been using , Anarnely wax and sand, in her most recent work. Freya tells us that her parents are no longer about her living the life of an artist. She says that it was a(n) l I that changed her parents’ perception of her career. - . ..l24fi §
  26. 26. ’ PART 3 You will hear part of a radio interview in which a travel writer, Owen Grifiths, is talking about his cflteer. For questions 15-20, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which fits best according to what you hear. Don't choose an answer based on an isolated word. Read the sentence and make sure you 15 Why does Owen feel well suited to a career as a travel writer? Understand the A He believes he has the desire and determination to succeed. ovejvajj meaning, B He finds it easy to adjust to living in different places. C He feels he has both the right character and skills. D He doesn’t feel ready to settle down in one place. 16 Why did Owen work for a newspaper after leaving university? A to gain writing experience B to follow in his mother’s footsteps C to finance his novel writing D to please his parents 17 Why was Owen’s first travel piece published? A The paper had been planning a piece on that region. B He was the only writer able to meet the deadline. C It solved a problem for his boss. D His boss wanted to reward him. 18 According to Owen, what quality must a travel piece possess? A It needs a balance between information and opinion. B it has to appeal to all readers of the newspaper. C it should be constructed like a short story. D It must convey the writer’s enthusiasm for the place. 19 What criticism does Owen make of his own writing? A He sometimes struggles to produce original pieces. B He often ends up leaving out the best parts of his journeys. C He believes his ideas could be better organised. D He sometimes writes to please himself more than his readers. 20 According to Owen, what is the ultimate aim of travel writing? A to present an accurate picture of places around the world B to encourage the readers to visit certain places C to challenge wrong ideas people have about places D to engage the reader on an emotional level X. 3 is
  27. 27. PART‘ 4 You will hear five short extracts in which people are talking about the use of technology n their work-. l Make sure you read both tasks before you listen the first time. While you listen you must complete both tasks. i For questions 21-25, choose from the list (A-H) the job each speaker does. A coach driver painter Speaker 1 CE j bank clerk Speaker 2 security guard Speaker3 DE ‘E policeman Speaker4 hotel receptionist _ Speakers BE G travel agent «>4-4'0» . ... .r. -.efi~, -om, .. .. s.. . ‘I1 U 0 W . . ~. w.. -.. ... .. j H aphotographer TASK TWO For questions 26-30, choose from the list (A-H) what each speaker expresses. colleagues’ reluctance to use technology a successful transfer of his or her new skills Speaker 1 Speaker 2 H changes in consumer habits affecting business Speaker 3 A B C a dislike of other peoples’ attitudes D E apprehension about career prospects Speaker 4 F a desire to change working practices speaker 5 G a dislike of staff training H their preference for a traditional way of working *'“ xaau; wmmW_ _m_ _ . _._ ~54 , _,t, . ... .. i.Qfl: e¥«»1ttl. ~:*stfV>ctlnrmrx¢€k". e'n“v? .i. ’tt:
  28. 28. jQ't‘. *Vv--nv~7uM’''9~‘‘¢“l'I'lvtW0)u‘? ,V¢w'! «h Don't spend too much time on any one part of the paper. There may be three texts here but these make up one part of the paper so keep that in mind and allocate time accordingly. ” PART t (1 hour 15 minutes) You are going to read three extracts which are all concerned in some way with film and theatre. For queséggns 1-6, choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fits best according to the text. There's no earthly reason why a studio of Pixar’s heft should make a film like WALLOE. Luxuriously in the black on every film they've ever made, they have many delighted shareholders and a new boss to keep happy now that they're officially part of the Disney empire, and a trusting audience whose largest complaint to date has been that some of their films have failed to be instantly classic and merely managed to be very, very good. in the animation world they're unparalleled in witty dialogue and nice shiny textures, and everyone would probably be happy to devour more of the same for years to come. Well, thank goodness that Pixar appears to have lost some of its business sense, and made a film_ 3 that's like nothing we'd expect, except in its quality. That WALLGE is such a triumph sets a new precedent for Pixar. if they are to stick their necks out with a film that veers from their comfort zone and pays great dividends — assuming it's the hit it deserves to be at the box office — then we as an audience have a right to expect them to continue pushing themselves and taking risks. This experiment is an unqualified success, ‘ and means that a simple buddy comedy, even one as intelligently and expertly crafted as Ratatouille, might seem unambitlous as a follow-up. We'll now expect surprise as well as delight. You've raised the bar, Pixar: now jump it again. 1 The writer implies that the decision to make WALL: -E was taken A in response to criticisms of previous Pixar films. , B because Pixar could afford to take such a financial risk. C for reasons other than to satisfy the demands of the market. D in an attempt to produce a film of a higher quality than usual. 2 in the second paragraph, the writer suggests that Pixar A may find it difficult to make a film as good as WALLOE again. B need to maintain a high level of originality in their next film. C may be risking too much with films that are so artistically experimental. D should put all their efforts into making a sequel to WALLGE. 27>
  29. 29. N°C°utSeS at RADAare Ea-sv To become an actor, stage manager, technician, designer or director takesnot only talent but dedication, comrnitment, energy and time. All our students work long hours and most discover physical, mental and emotional reserves they never , . -V4‘ . ,<, ,""‘_", L‘. ’ knew they possessed. ~ ~ The rewards are great ~ the mastery of a craft, the confidence of self—expression, the sense of being a vital part of something bigger than yourself —- but they may not come quickly. Our students frequently attain overnight fame, but that is not our goal: we want our graduates still to be applying their RADA-training long after they have left us. We've been training first class theatre-makers for over a hundred. years, but we haven't stopped inquiring how we can do it better. Our teachers draw upon their experience of the past and present to give our students the expertise to shape the drama of tomorrow. X/ e cannot give you the desire to be the best in your field, but if you have it, our staff will help you nurture, focus and refine it. 3 it is hoped that RADA students will A focus on discovering who they are rather than attaining success. B achieve success quickly and maintain it long-term. C avoid valuing the attainment of success above everything else. D develop a persistent determination to succeed no matter what. 4 What is the writer emphasising in the third paragraph? A the drive and ambition necessary for students to succeed B the pride the school takes in its achievements C the school's belief in personal and professional development D the qualities necessary to become a skilled actor v fixes As.
  30. 30. Chicken Shed Ten years ago, researching a feature for a Sunday newspaper, I saw The only piece of drama I've ever seen which achieved what many would argue is the Theatre's ultimate ambition: to change profoundly the way we look at The world. The play, The Attraction, was a musical loosely based on The myth of Beauty and the Beast written and performed by a then little-known outfit called Chicken Shed. It would be dishonest to pretend that the commission filled me with glee. Chicken Shed, I was briefed, was a theatre company that purported to fully-integrate the disabled and able- bodied, and The Attraction was Their biggest project so far. To be truthful, I expected, at best, a poorly-written, poorly—performed piece of community Theatre; and. at worst, an excruciation which patronised the disabled by affecting to include them in an activity from which their bodies prevented Them playing any more than a purely passive role. 9 What I saw that night was something quite different, something so extraordinary that to this day I can remember not just the plot, The performers and even some of the tunes, but also how i felt — an oddly complex cocktail of emotions ranging from astonishment, wistfulness and a sense of heightened humility to extreme excitement, surging optimism and sheer joy. 5 Why was the writer unenthusiastic about seeing the performance? A He didn‘t believe such an amateur company could pull it off successfully. B He had been previously disappointed by community theatre. C He believed it would be too difficult to judge it by normal criteria. D He didn’t believe it could achieve what the theatre company claimed. 6 The writer suggests that the performance ultimately A proved the experts wrong regarding the ambition of theatre. B provoked in him feelings of confusion and self-doubt. C far exceeded his personal expectations. D caused him to feel ashamed of himself. 29
  31. 31. PART 2 You are going to read an extract from a magazine article. Six paragraphs have been removed from the extract. Choose from the paragraphs A-G the one wlfich fits each gap (7-12). There is one extra paragraph you do not need to use. on uoyé"-u use v'sn. §'+i‘{6s‘a"3§$‘i"§‘€“. . 5s'; .‘s¥£§£o'B{S§'fiiiif§‘ , ;sea”e3’aassa'n~u. ¢.v. oa. au. ..n. n.. .n. «.so. ss«. wn-«vaas»§a'. .as. n j'9c, saagcoooo‘uuc n_po4oo, I_g1Ap‘, gg~ There is a dragon in the lavatory. It is a giant: nine feet long and broad shouldered, with its dark, scaly head. It is drinking from the bowl and turns in a series of lumbering movements towards me, its forked tongue stabbing at the air. It is staring at me through tiny, reptile eyes; I am biting my lip to check I’m still awake. After travelling for three days, I have had my first experience of a Komodo dragon, in a Third World public convenience. The adults take longer to arrive, trundling out of the forest in a slow swagger. The dragons rely on their highly toxic saliva to kill their prey, and as they waddle towards the kitchen, strings of drool dribble from their dinosaur jaws. And so they drink from the lavatory instead. It is an incongruous, but sensational sight. Now all but confined to the tiny neighbouring islands of Komodo and Rinca, the 2,500 remaining dragons are like flotsam from another era, living fossils in the weirdest, most wonderful sense. "Over here! " shouts the ranger. "In the bushes, quick! " He is standing in the shadow of a small copse, with a gigantic dragon an arm’s length in front of him and his heavy wooden stick braced defensively between them. It is lying motionless in the pool of shade, but its eyes are as cold as an arctic gale, and its body is tense. As I lean forward to take a photograph, I feel like I’m staring down the muzzle of a gun - and I’m loving every minute of it. ‘v’r? ’l% Not only this, but it can also be very treacherous. "1 heard about large ferries being sucked under here, " says a German backpacker. "There was no warning, they were just dragged down by the currents and swallowed up. " It doesn’t sound like good news, but all the same we sit on deck in the sunshine, watching as Komodo slides past our bows. 9 As we settle down under turquoise skies to watch the dragons, every bumpy minute of the journey seems ' worthwhile. Although protected by the Komodo National Park, Rinca and Komodo are under pressure. The islands’ human population has increased 800 per cent in the last six decades and poaching of some of the dragons’ favourite prey is putting the giant reptiles inlperil. Once stranded at the ends of the earth, the Komodo dragon must increasingly compete with humans, and the outcome is far from certain. It is not serious, however, and within an hour, we are aboard the little plane, - buzzing back west towards the burger bars of Bali. It is 9am, and somewhere, 30,000-feet below, the dragons are once again following the smell of frying eggs to a group of tourists. . I'_. .*, , . ‘ . , . . , .h . . . . . r> . . ‘fig: -:‘. ..vd dvdvagoitnno-alt pun. -una-onfiuo uueoooodicun. -4-no-o -ucooucoaasv-um: -use
  32. 32. n 'i4'i3-uni we M It is breakfast time on the tiny A Two hours later and we are standing at the summit of a hill overlooking the ranger station and the pretty bay our boat is moored in. Up here, the giant reptiles are never far away. They lie in wait for water buffalo, the dragons’ favourite prey, and strike with breakneck speed when they stray within range. "We don’t feed them, but they come down here every morning anyway, " says the ranger. "Even if we did share our food, the big ones weigh 70kg and can eat 80 per cent of their body weight in a single sitting — it’s not like an omelette’s going to satisfy them. " The journey from the frenetic streets of Kuta in Bali began three days earlier, in the back of a coughing bus. Rinca and Komodo are best reached from the large, remote island of Flores — where, it was revealed this week, archaeologists discovered the skeletal remains of little humans. For 21st-century Homo sapiens, the slow trip east is a jamboree of four buses and three ferries. We dock in a tiny cove on Rinca’s northern shore, a postcard setting as evocative of prehistoric times as a trip through Jurassic Park. Rinca is the smaller of the dragons’ two island habitats, but chances of seeing the reptiles here are higher. Only a handful of tourists visit the island, and we have the ranger station to ourselves, with an invitation to " breakfast thrown in. Indonesian island of Rinca, and the smell of frying eggs hangs in the soggy ‘IagqIO, I’plg| QngAo; AAoA§uo- Q , .o~ua-A--an. -onon-sonaouco-noonnenuoou-agouaoosaonuouucoovoeou-nous-nae»-oooso. anauouuocannoocoaonouu-umaa-: qooocu: ., u tropical air. The young dragons, jumpy and excitable and barely a foot long, have already been attracted by the cooking smells, and dart between trees as they close in on the ranger station. Named Flores (which means ‘flowers’) by the Portuguese who once settled here, this wild, volcanic island is one of Indonesia’s most spectacular. Rundown Labuhaubajo is little more than a chaotic mishmash of wood and tin, but its setting, around a dramatic bay filled with islets, is absolutely stunning. Back on Flores, the buses east are bumpier than ever. But by the time we have checked into a hotel room in the eastern town of Maumere, with a plane ticket back to Bali on the bedside table, we feel like we have returned to the 21st century. But there is one final reminder that we are at the untamed end of the modern world. Waiting for the plane back to Bali, we are hit by an earthquake. After reading the incomplete text, look carefully at the information which comes before and after each gap. Pay special attention to words which refer to people, time and places.
  33. 33. PART 3 You are going to read a newspaper article. For questions 13-19 choose the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think fits best according to the text. Actress Gina McKee, the star of Donmar’s ‘lvanov’, is nothing like the women she portrays. Alice Jones meets her. ' Elegant, alabaster~pale and with a measured munnur of a voice, Gina McKee is, initially at least, regally mysterious. But every so often you catch a chink in the actress's calm exterior. More than once she breaks off from one of her thoughtfully evasive answers to say, with a strong hint of a Geordie accent, “blether, blether” or “I don't want to sound too posh. ..”. When l walk into her opulent hotel suite, she is standing looking rneditatively out of the window in a neat purple cardigan, knee-length black silk skirt and ballet pumps, but, as she turns, she crams a biscuit into her mouth and mumbles hello through a mouthful of crumbs. Later, when there is a knock at the door, she leaps up to open it and sprints girlishly down the corridor. ‘ This ability to combine a star quality with that of a clown—to— earth every woman in her performances, which offer only the mildest of hints at the emotion swirling beneath a coolly restrained surface, have made McKee one of Britain's most respected actresses. McKee's first Chekhov role in lvanov pits her opposite Kenneth Branagh as the tubercular wife of lvanov (Branagh). Anna's physical and mental health disintegrates as her husband indulges in a mid-life crisis. “Somebody asked me at work, ‘is this the first Chekhov play you've done? ’ And l nearly said ‘noi l don't even know wh)/ ,‘ she admits. You can see why, though. McKee and Chekhov would seem to be a match made in heaven — all wan suffering and overwrought emotions bubbling under the surface. So does all this repressed emotion burst out of her when she stops working? ‘'1 was filming Mike Leigh's Naked and l was really immersed in it. l went to a dinner party and one of my friends asked, ‘do you not bring it home with you? ‘ i said, ‘no’ and, at exactly the same time, my husband said ‘yes’. She smiles ruefully. As a rule, Mcl<ee likes to keep the boundaries strictly drawn between home and work. Of her husband, she says vaguely: “He's been in the industry but he's not now. What's great is that he understands how it works? ‘ She's aware that she has previously come across as frostily guarded on personal matters. “There's a way of negotiating how you portray your private life publicly that l‘ve never had the skill to do, ” she confesses. “in the beginning 1 was slightly clumsy about it. ” Far from being a precocious child star, as a teenager McKee spotted a poster for a youth drama workshop in a shop window and joined up. She was spotted by a TV scout and landed a part on the children's show Quest of Eagles in 1979. On leaving school, McKee was all set to study theatre design at art college. “But at the eleventh hour l got on a midnight bus to London. ” There, she applied to and was rejected by three drama schools —— Bristol, Lamda and Central. “To be fair, Central said come back next year, when you're 18. But by the time I was l8, 1 was working. i think those three schools recognised that l wasn't going to settle down there. Maybe it would have helped. I was a bit on the back foot —l wasn't very good about advertising myself. lt was a slow burn? ’ Slow burn or not, she soon landed parts in Auf Wiedersehen, Pet and inspector Morse and eventually Our Friends in the North, with a cast including Daniel Gaig. in her Bafta—winning turn as Mary, McKee aged from 18 to 52. Now 44 years old, does ageing concern her? “No. it's great being in your forties. i feel like l've got enough history to learn from and enough future to enjoy. " That said, when 1 ask her later about one of her credits on the movie website lMDb, she launches into a good-humoured rant. “They've got my age wrong! l'm younger than that. l was born in 1964, not 196i. 1 clon‘t think l've got anyone else's C/ . But I've got somebody else's age. One of my agents tried to change it and they won't —l suppose they think every actress is trying to pretend they're younger. .I’ So having worked with pretty much every significant name in British film, does Gina McKee hanl<er after a Hollywood career, like that of her erstwhile colleague Craig? “l'm chuffed to bits for Danny. But it's not an obvious comparison, is it? l'm never going be James Bond, l've got to face that. But l‘ve never put up geographic boundaries for my work. Plenty of people are going to put things in your way, why would l do that? l'm in a position wherel can easily travel. l'm married but 1 don't have children so it's not like i have to stay for school and all that. But the whole big-time Hollywood thing, it's incredibly unlikely, isn't it? ” Would she feel adrift in LA, away from her Northern roots? McKee thinks hard for a moment before giving a typically ambiguous answer. “Where i grew up in the North-east, the community there, and the way people relate to one another, goes very deep. But l don't define myself as a Northerner in that l don't live in the North. 50 what does that make me? ” she ponders. “l suppose l'm a bit of everything, like a Woolworths pic‘n’n1ix. ” an ~ w~«: vAw. w>«: sr. ;; am
  34. 34. fi2:‘: r<= :: <~: .:. »_t. At first read only the questions, without the options. This will help you to read more effectively later. . .._. _.. aw. mz¢a»: s:n<; e:nceex: >e: :tasaaa°&. :rIr: ‘ss“; ?s§§a. ‘* ""'@’&; Wt§4’i'éFriztr? zlva"aurmu»: .w. ~.m~u~ —-. _.»_. .-. .. 18 What is the writer emphasising about the actress in the first paragraph? A her manner of speaking B her serious, contemplative air Q C her graceful, elegant appearance D her contradictory characteristics In the second paragraph, we learn that Gina McKee V A always plays the same kind of character. B has the perfect qualities for her current role. C is very~ordinary behind her facade. D is quickly rising to unexpected stardom. What point does the writer make about the actress’ personal life? A It is a difficult topic of discussion for her. B Her husband sometimes cannot empathise with her. C She appears somewhat cold and insensitive on the subject. D It is something she refuses to talk about publicly. It is implied that when Gina McKee was trying to start her acting career, A others didn’t believe she would make it. B the odds seemed stacked against her. C she almost gave up several times. D she did all the wrong things. When talking about her age, Gina McKee revealsthat A others are more concerned about it than she is. B she is often encouraged to pretend that she is younger. C others may believe that she is uncomfortable with it. D her career could be affected by it being wrongly reported. When the writer asks Gina McKee about her future aspirations, she says that A she is willing to make personal sacrifices for the sake of her career. B she is open to possibilities without having unrealistic expectations. C she is keener to fulfill personal ambitions than to achieve greater success. D she is determined to prove wrong those who have tried to put limitations on her. Gina McKee‘s answer to the writer’s final question A could be interpreted in more than one way. B doesn’t necessarily reflect her true feelings. C failed to answer her question adequately. D changes her original impression of her.
  35. 35. :4/734-. , Exam; Don’t waste time reading the whole text several times in detail. Read once carefully, then try to zoom in on what answers the questions. 4 F PART 4 You are going to read an article about the results of a review writing competition. For questions 20-34, choose from the section (A-l-1% The sections may be chosen more than once. Note: When more than one answer is required, these may be given in any order. Which section of the article mentions reviews of one genre unexpectedly having something in common? the fact that an entrant may have a bright future as a writer? @ an overall satisfaction with reviews in a category? E an observation made by an entrant that was overlooked by others? an initial uncertainty regarding how to spot quality entries’? W the necessity of critics maintaining a persistentapproach? a work which was considered together with wider factors 5 an entrant who showed passion for a genre and such tasks? 27 the fact that entrants paid attention to an important suggestion? . 1. S I I 5 E 1 5 i S ta; fig; i VS¥ , =.—*'zn-wvazxn-n-srmx v r-«--——-~——- the fact that sometimes reviews that writers have tried to perfect do not stand out in the end? an entrant who won only after a debate between judges? an entry provoking a judge’s interest in a work despite the fact he or she wasn’t familiar with it? an appreciation of a review, despite the fact that there were many reviews of the same work? the fact that a judge was pleased by an observation made by some entrants? l. “ ~'~A ~— -~—-—« ------------ ——————— . ... ... ... ... ... ... . . ._ __________________ , _____ ____ ___. _________M__’ ~ ; lwrl«‘~'w: ':l: ;. ti
  36. 36. i if is it try this alhome Britrmin, ‘boating lakes, the . S‘0LtI’L(l- of dying , werewolves the entries to our young critics’ comperitiori were firllof surprises. Arts editor fa . r: i i ii‘ i , .-. ..__. ... .. {V4-‘V . ... V.. ..~», A., m.. ~_«. v Aer? ‘-“: ‘*“‘fis"‘r A . Melissa Denes reveals who won. . . A iW11en wellaulnched our young critics ' competition this summer, we weren’t entirely sure what we were after. After all, i What makes a great piece of criticism ——. and a really persuasive critic? We started by asking our own writers to explain, in 400 ' words, what they were doing day in, day out, Even they weren’t sure. Nancy Banks- . Smith, TV critic for nearly 40 years, wrote: "Anybody who can write can be a TV critic for a month. After that, you need stamina. “ Adrian Searle, our art critic, said there was really only one rule: "Look, look again, and A _ keep on looking. If you don’t like looking, . don’t write, about art. " ‘There were eight 1. categories, split into two age groups: under 14 and 14-18. j f Artist Gavin Turk, who helped judge the visual art category, was delighted by the popularity of Martin Creed’s Work No 850, in which athletes sprint through Tate Britain. He liked how you, found the humour. in it, noticing that people giggled _ as the runners went by. ‘ And you all seemed to heed Searlefs advice. You looked _ and looked again — at Vivienne Westwood’s ball gown, at Tracey Eminfs short. films. ’ Our winner was Tim Davies, 16, who _ wrote vividly about the rooftop boating lake at the Hayward gallery’s Psycho — Buildings show in London. Judges Alexis Petridis and ‘Lauren Laverne wereunited on the 14-18 pop Winner: Hannah Ehrlich, 15, who reviewed l_Spiritualized’s Songs in A&E. VPetridis thought’ she’d spotted something the professionals missed: that Spirii; ualized’s focus on drugs and rede1nption; was another form of Vmacho hedonism". In the under-14s, the judges argued about what, they were looking for, but our winner was 13—‘iyear'-old Robert Hardy’s review of the‘ Big Gig in Bromley, London -4 because, said Laverne, “it’s got spirit": 1 ‘ There was a surprisingly cynical tone to the TV reviews but also a lot of spritely writing. Olivia McCarthy, 12, won for her review of , BBC2’s Thames Shipwrecks; in the older group, Nancy Banks-Smith felt 18-year-old Annie Hodson’s take on Boris Johnson’s Who Do You Think You Are? was “amusing and readable, —‘ way ahead’? of the others”. Fellow judge David Attenborough agreed: her voice was strong enough to make him . thirtkabout the programmephe said, even though he hadn’t seen it. : °,“: ’,~*. f:: -~-, -., ,,, , -, -: . =9r: r1:4a; v.sziwsi¢~. ~.3sc. ».~. ... ..a. ..1.e; e._. ;_. .»
  37. 37. no PART 4 i try this atlome E Heath Ledger’s brilliantly evil Joker caught the imagination of our young ‘ '7 film critics. Seamus Conlon, 13, won ‘for his review of The Dark Knight: “In Burton’s' Batman, “ he Wrote, “Jack Nicholson did a very good job of being Jack Nicholson. Here Ledger completely destroys everything of Nicholson’s clown. " While director Beeban Kidron and critic Peter Bradshaw grumbled about the sheer number of Batman reviews, they enjoyed Seamus’s close reading of the epic. In the older age group, 16~year-old Ellie Whittaker’s review of Mamma Mia! took first place. Bradshaw found Ellie the funniestjwriter — crucial when it comes to a film, as Ellie put it, “Whose storyline is constructed solely around the hits of a shiny spandex- clad 7 Os band from Svveden“. ‘In the classicalymusic category, judge Myleene ; Klass thought Kathryn Buck. ley’s review of the CBSO Youth‘ Orchestra showed "maturity — she has fantastic potential", But‘ she was‘ outvoted byp. 'Guardian ‘critics ‘Tom Service, Erica Jeal and Andrew Clements, who plumped for Ben Weaver- Hincks’ review of an EMI recording of Stabat Mater. In the dance category, Amelia Tearle’s review of Romeo and Juliet at the Royal Opera‘ House _ triumphed. "She clearly loves theballet and ‘enjoys writing, " said i judge and choreographer Richard Alston of Amelia, aged 16. I p ’ ‘ ‘ G Our judges found something toilike in every architecture review. ‘ The prize 1 went to Louise Naylor, _16, for her piece, ‘ about Leeds Market: “detailed carving; of dragons and dates, ,still'meticulous, having braved the acid rain". Both A Jonathan Glancey and Zaha Hadid , A admired the way 'Louise’si Writing "meandered through the‘b. uilding“ while ‘still placing it in its larger context. 1 ‘ ~ A Shakespeare A domiinated”, H theatre. yMagdalen‘lChristie, 12, won for her; review of Timoniof Athens at the Globe. Playwright Royl Williarns: ,,didn’t ‘know the play, i»"but Magdalen made ; me curious". In"thé oldencategory, the winner was,17‘-‘year-‘old Tilly Spencer’s J ‘ ‘review of Hamletl at , Stiiatford—uponé' Avon. ‘ Our critic. Mic‘hael_ Billington‘ praised her ', ‘good descriptions of the ' major performances". V ; 'Wl’1at did we learn? That’ and last p lines are hard, however: old youare. That: , "incredible" and "am£iZ_iI1‘gW are al deadi“. '»' end when it comes to ‘getting to the heart _ [of what 'mal: ;es' something wonderful. A ‘Thatthebest reviews arerrt always. ’ the most polished: wherever you hadfun, we ‘ had‘ fun, too, It’s been an adventure. Let’s do it all‘ again next year. Andremember: keep on _ looking. fl1"‘: ‘Z3,T_‘; '.; fLL<-ZE""E? IT"f'-7‘JT2:‘»‘? ’;”‘? 'i>? ‘;‘T“’ . Ii '. r‘z, .:-5:-fir: -v'. : ; :-: ~7,~v': —;rc. fi—: ::: -.v. is . .~. mr_r. w;ms: <¢-v: :—i—. -:a: .«¢v«= ~;: ;—: =:«« —. z—. ———4 , .—, ,- . -, k»'»>: 'v; "r‘. -:~; ~«'%“.
  38. 38. sui . z~§. ~,o~. .,~. , -., ;.. Make sure you read all the information given to you in the form of lists, notes or comments, as these form the basis for your answer. The type of language used in presenting the information given will help you decide how formal or informal your answer should be. : -{PART 1 (1 hour 30 mins) You must answer this question. Write your answer in 180-220 wgrds in an appropriate style. 1 Last summer you had a job with an international company that promotes films. Your friend Eddy has written to you asking about it. Read the extract from your friend’s letter and from your diary below. Then, using the information appropriately, write a letter to your friend saying whether or not you would recommend the job to your friend and giving your reasons. 40 what do gov think? The 'l’hin5_l rea! lI1 want is to watch loaolé of new film; anal §a/6 enough c/ aéh for a i’l0ilalal1. l’ol also love to vée mi, Englich anal 53'/ l‘ some vcefvl work experience at the éame time. Cheeré, wmm-w4muum. «mmmn—. qnm. .mnnwu«. uummw. ¢.»um—. »«m~u. .u—. ~.. ~.. m., _ ® 61”}! July Not a lot to do. Sat around answering the phones all day. The only exciting thing was getting to run up and down the stairs to deliver a few messages. @ 9th July Things are improving. Got to see some new films on the office DVD player. Even got to speak to an American film director on the phone! Q 13th July Got paid today. The money isn’t bad but I need to spend less by making my own sandwiches and walking to work. @ 1 9th July Great day. Got invited on an albexpenses-paid trip to the Venice Film Festival! Write your letter. You do not need to include postal addresses.
  39. 39. ~ PART 2 Write an answer to one of the questions 2-5 in this part. Write your answer in 220-260 words in an appropriate style. Q ’ 2 A friend of yours has applied for a job as an activities coordinator at a_ summer camp for children and you have been asked to provide a reference. The advertisement for the job stated that the successful candidates would have relevant skills to offer in the areas of In order to write a report or a proposal, you will need to use 'e‘eVantV°°ab”lary' sport, music or the performing arts (drama, dance etc) as well as having excellent You need l0 “S9 organisational skills. straightfonlvard, l0|'mal lallguagé‘ You should include information about your friend's personality, character and skills, any and write in an relevant previous experience and reasons why you would recommend them for the job. impersonal tone. Write your reference. 3 You are entering an essay—writing competition. You must write an essay with the title ‘Many schools today are investing heavily in new technology. How important do you think this is? ’ - Write your essay. 4 You work part-time at a sports centre and have received this memo from your boss. . , l . . . . . -ma. r.x: m.4¢l. ‘>J1A; A«ur¥’W. umLt. £E5‘l1aA7¢-fiKJ1fi$t3(~(§lIt; §.vll1fiA: vi§; {c€« As nou know, we have seen a recent drop in membership figyres here at l the centre. i would be grateful if nou could write me a report outlining. r"""“i what nov believe are the ‘strengths and weaknesses of the centre. F lease lolentifn what the most lilceln reasons for the drop in membership are and suggest possible wan; to solve this problem. W1”7i= ?L‘A’VNNlA! f’4’<"’MtViVi"»'! '<': Vl/ I"'EMw1.tr3Mrvi-r4“‘*«r">Mr~‘": qq~p~vr-rt , ‘4‘<‘~i*- -~- Write your report. 5 Answer one of the following two questions based on one’ of the books you have read. (a) Choose one character in the book and write an essay comparing the relationships he/ she has with two other people in the book. » (b) Write an article based on an imaginary interview with one of the characters from the book for a magazine. l

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