TEDxNYED -- Dan Meyer

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My talk from TEDxNYED.

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  • -- offering what you love to people who don’t want it
    -- wager next paycheck that 50% of you couldn’t pass an Algebra II final
  • -- breaking math into two crude categories -- computation and application.
  • -- breaking math into two crude categories -- computation and application.















































  • -- offering what you love to people who don’t want it
    -- wager next paycheck that 50% of you couldn’t pass an Algebra II final
  • TEDxNYED -- Dan Meyer

    1. 1. Math Curriculum Makeover by Dan Meyer who writes at blog.mrmeyer.com who receives e-mail at dan@mrmeyer.com and tweets @ddmeyer presented at TEDxNYED on 2010 Mar 6
    2. 2. a. (x + 4)(x + 3.5) = 0 b. 2(x – 2)(x – 6) = 0 c. (x + 3)(x – 7)(x + 8) = 0 d. x(x – 9)(x + 3) = 0 2. Graph each equation and then rewrite it in factored form. a. y = x2 – 4x + 3 b. y = x2 + 5x – 24 c. y = x2 + 12x + 27 computation d. y = x2 – 7x – 30 3. Name the x-intercepts of the parabola described by each quadratic equation. Then check your answers with a graph. a. y = (x – 7)(x + 2) b. y = 2(x + 1)(x + 8) c. y = 3(x – 11)(x + 7) d. y = (0.4x + 2)(x – 9) 4. Write an equation of a quadratic function that corresponds to each pair of x-intercepts. Assume there is no vertical stretch or shrink. a. 2.5 and –1 b. –4 and –4 c. –2 and 2 d. r 1 a 5. Consider the equation y = (x + 1)(x – 3). a. How many x-intercepts does the graph have? b. Find the vertex of this parabola. c. Write the equation in vertex form. Describe the transformations of the parent function, y = x2 . Reason and Apply Key Press.
    3. 3. a. (x + 4)(x + 3.5) = 0 b. 2(x – 2)(x – 6) = 0 c. (x + 3)(x – 7)(x + 8) = 0 d. x(x – 9)(x + 3) = 0 2. Graph each equation and then rewrite it in factored form. a. y = x2 – 4x + 3 b. y = x2 + 5x – 24 c. y = x2 + 12x + 27 d. y = x2 – 7x – 30 3. Name the x-intercepts of the parabola described by each quadratic equation. Then check your answers with a graph. a. y = (x – 7)(x + 2) b. y = 2(x + 1)(x + 8) c. y = 3(x – 11)(x + 7) d. y = (0.4x + 2)(x – 9) 4. Write an equation of a quadratic function that corresponds to each pair of x-intercepts. Assume there is no vertical stretch or shrink. application Key Press.
    4. 4. 1. Lack of initiative. 2. Lack of perseverance. 3. Lack of retention. 4. Aversion to word problems. 5. Eagerness for formula.
    5. 5. 1. Lack of initiative. 2. Lack of perseverance. 3. Lack of retention. 4. Aversion to word problems. 5. Eagerness for formula.
    6. 6. 1. Lack of initiative. 2. Lack of perseverance. 3. Lack of retention. 4. Aversion to word problems. 5. Eagerness for formula.
    7. 7. 1. Lack of initiative. 2. Lack of perseverance. 3. Lack of retention. 4. Aversion to word problems. 5. Eagerness for formula.
    8. 8. 1. Lack of initiative. 2. Lack of perseverance. 3. Lack of retention. 4. Aversion to word problems. 5. Eagerness for formula.
    9. 9. http://dir.salon.com/story/ent/feature/2005/03/05/milch/index.html
    10. 10. CBS.
    11. 11. “ It creates an impatience, for example, with irresolution. And I’m doing what I can to tell stories which engage those issues in ways that can engage the imagination so that people don’t feel threatened by it. — David Milch http://web.mit.edu/comm-forum/forums/great_writer.htm
    12. 12. Holt, Rinehart, Winston.
    13. 13. Holt, Rinehart, Winston.
    14. 14. Holt, Rinehart, Winston.
    15. 15. Holt, Rinehart, Winston.
    16. 16. Holt, Rinehart, Winston.
    17. 17. Key Curriculum Press.
    18. 18. Key Curriculum Press.
    19. 19. Key Curriculum Press.
    20. 20. “ The formulation of a problem is often more essential than its solution, which may be merely a matter of mathematical or experimental skill. — Albert Einstein http://quotationsbook.com/quote/32471/
    21. 21. water tank -- text book full page
    22. 22. water tank -- text book water tank problem highlighted
    23. 23. water tank -- lose the steps you want students to become strong at decomposing a big task into smaller tasks don’t do that for them.
    24. 24. water tank -- lose the given information. you give them the height, you give them the side length you just send them scurrying for a formula that contains the variables s and h. you want your students asking the question, “what are the essential details of this water tank.
    25. 25. water tank -- photo
    26. 26. water tank -- video, start, plain, no timer
    27. 27. water tank -- video, plain, no timer
    28. 28. water tank -- text book full page
    29. 29. 1. Lack of initiative. 2. Lack of perseverance. 3. Lack of retention. 4. Aversion to word problems. 5. Eagerness for formula.
    30. 30. 1. Use multimedia. 2. Encourage student intuition. 3. Ask the shortest question you can. 4. Let students build the problem. 5. Be less helpful.
    31. 31. 1. Use multimedia. 2. Encourage student intuition. 3. Ask the shortest question you can. 4. Let students build the problem. 5. Be less helpful.
    32. 32. 1. Use multimedia. 2. Encourage student intuition. 3. Ask the shortest question you can. 4. Let students build the problem. 5. Be less helpful.
    33. 33. 1. Use multimedia. 2. Encourage student intuition. 3. Ask the shortest question you can. 4. Let students build the problem. 5. Be less helpful.
    34. 34. 1. Use multimedia. 2. Encourage student intuition. 3. Ask the shortest question you can. 4. Let students 5. Be less helpful.
    35. 35. ABC.
    36. 36. Math Curriculum Makeover by Dan Meyer who writes at blog.mrmeyer.com who receives e-mail at dan@mrmeyer.com and tweets @ddmeyer presented at TEDxNYED on 2010 Mar 6

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