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David De Roure, Graham Klyne, Kevin R. Page, John Pybus,
David M. Weigl, Matthew Wilcoxson, and Pip Willcox

OXFORD E-RESE...
Whether	in	the	science	lab	or	the	music	studio,	
we	go	in	with	a	plan,	we	perform,	and	we	make	
a	record	of	that	performan...
Capturing the experiment record
2
Cerys	Willoughby
Sean	Bechhofer
Carolin	Rindfleisch
Terhi	Nurmikko-Fuller
Solid	State	Logic	
“Seamless	integra8on	with	all	the	
benefits	of	classic	SSL	analogue	console	
automa8on	and	DAW	based	wor...
Both	domains	are	increasingly	data-intensive,	
with	the	adop8on	of	new	technology,	and	also	
socially	intensive	with	democ...
vimeo.com/98560778	chordify.net	
The	Theory	and	Prac8ce	
of	Social	Machines	
	
sociam.org	
www.zooniverse.org	
www.music-i...
chemistry	lab	
music	studio	
computa8onal	workflow	
business	workflow	
archaeology	
early	printed	works	
interac8ve	tool	
hu...
demeter.oerc.ox.ac.uk/NumbersIntoNotes
The	music	industry	has	embraced	digital	
technology	throughout	the	lifecycle	from	
composi8on	to	consump8on;	scien8fic	prac...
Process	
Process	
Process	Develop	
Develop	
Record	
Record	Record	
Idea	
Idea	Idea	
Publish	
Fund	 Publish	
Fund	
Read	
Re...
Pre	
During	
Post	
Discovery	of	
music/ar8cle	
Listening	to	music	
Reading	ar8cle	
Buying	of	
music/ar8cle	
Deciding	what	...
Why	isn’t	it	as	easy	to	find	and	play	research	as	it	is	music?
Building	on	the	
e-Science	literature
www.researchobject.org	
Eamonn	Maguire
Our	inves8ga8on	explores	the	no8on	of	the	
Digital	Music	Object	(DMO),	analogous	to	the	
Research	Object,	for	rich	capture...
PR,	
Ticke8ng,	
Event	org	
Science	Museum,	
PR,	percussion	spec,	
s8lls,	handouts	
Tmus	
materials	
Ada	sketches	
performa...
•  Audio	files,	including	mul8ple	STEMS	of	recorded	music	
•  Other	associated	media	files,	especially	video	
•  MIDI	and	ot...
DMOs	in	progress	
1.  Mutability.	Considering	“Lazy”	ID	alloca8on,	on	access.	
2.  Distributed	and	heterogenous	content.	D...
Closing	thoughts	
1.  Our	work	has	emphasized	the	importance	of	
describing	process,	both	prospec'vely	and	
retrospec'vely...
Thanks	to	Steve	Benford	and	Alan	Chamberlain	(University	of	Nogngham),	
Terhi	Nurmikko-Fuller,	Carolin	Rindfleisch	and	Ségo...
www.oerc.ox.ac.uk	
david.deroure@oerc.ox.ac.uk	
@dder
Plans and Performances
Plans and Performances
Plans and Performances
Plans and Performances
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Plans and Performances

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Plans and Performances: Parallels in the Production of Science and Music, by David De Roure, Graham Klyne, Kevin R. Page, John Pybus, David M. Weigl, Matthew Wilcoxson, and Pip Willcox. Presented at IEEE e-Science 2016, Baltimore, 25 October 2016

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Plans and Performances

  1. 1. David De Roure, Graham Klyne, Kevin R. Page, John Pybus, David M. Weigl, Matthew Wilcoxson, and Pip Willcox OXFORD E-RESEARCH CENTRE AND BODLEIAN LIBRARIES Plans and Performances: Parallels in the Production of Science and Music
  2. 2. Whether in the science lab or the music studio, we go in with a plan, we perform, and we make a record of that performance for distribu8on, consump8on, and reuse.
  3. 3. Capturing the experiment record 2 Cerys Willoughby
  4. 4. Sean Bechhofer
  5. 5. Carolin Rindfleisch
  6. 6. Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller
  7. 7. Solid State Logic “Seamless integra8on with all the benefits of classic SSL analogue console automa8on and DAW based workflow.”
  8. 8. Both domains are increasingly data-intensive, with the adop8on of new technology, and also socially intensive with democra8sed and growing ci8zen engagement.
  9. 9. vimeo.com/98560778 chordify.net The Theory and Prac8ce of Social Machines sociam.org www.zooniverse.org www.music-ir.org/mirex
  10. 10. chemistry lab music studio computa8onal workflow business workflow archaeology early printed works interac8ve tool human completeness of process record machine ci8zen science “Accidents of preserva8on and discovery…”
  11. 11. demeter.oerc.ox.ac.uk/NumbersIntoNotes
  12. 12. The music industry has embraced digital technology throughout the lifecycle from composi8on to consump8on; scien8fic prac8ce, and scholarly communica8on, are also undergoing transforma8on.
  13. 13. Process Process Process Develop Develop Record Record Record Idea Idea Idea Publish Fund Publish Fund Read Read Plan Plan Plan Cameron Neylon
  14. 14. Pre During Post Discovery of music/ar8cle Listening to music Reading ar8cle Buying of music/ar8cle Deciding what to purchase Ra8ng play lists Ci8ng ar8cle Organising library Making recommenda8ons Consumer Ac8vity Cycle 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Reuse of digital content Based on Vandermerwe
  15. 15. Why isn’t it as easy to find and play research as it is music?
  16. 16. Building on the e-Science literature
  17. 17. www.researchobject.org Eamonn Maguire
  18. 18. Our inves8ga8on explores the no8on of the Digital Music Object (DMO), analogous to the Research Object, for rich capture, sharing and reuse of both process and content.
  19. 19. PR, Ticke8ng, Event org Science Museum, PR, percussion spec, s8lls, handouts Tmus materials Ada sketches performance Recording, Video, S8lls Tmus materials DRMN+10 Recording, Video, S8lls Centre for Digital Scholarship Lovelace Symposium Simula8on Band Mesmerism Bags and stems
  20. 20. •  Audio files, including mul8ple STEMS of recorded music •  Other associated media files, especially video •  MIDI and other kinds of directly playable formats •  Algorithms and other kinds of genera8ve music •  Scores and other nota8ons that enable humans to perform the music •  In turn, the metadata might poten8ally describe: •  The provenance of the music generated during its composi8on, produc8on and performance •  Descrip8ons of the instruments, performers, segngs, effects, patches and so forth a •  The structure, form and genre of the music, from official musical forms to more everyday no8ons of style, genre and even mood and emo8on •  The broader history of the music including where it has been played, who has listened to it and who has covered it. From the FAST Manifesto
  21. 21. DMOs in progress 1.  Mutability. Considering “Lazy” ID alloca8on, on access. 2.  Distributed and heterogenous content. DMO as assembly script/Makefile? 3.  Digital Rights Management 4.  Checksums provide useful weak guarantees, but mul8media content and streams are challenging 5.  Pervasive support for provenance 6.  Compliance with industry standards – for content and packaging 7.  Physical manifesta8ons… Steve Benford
  22. 22. Closing thoughts 1.  Our work has emphasized the importance of describing process, both prospec'vely and retrospec'vely –  Workflow representa8ons are well rehearsed –  Early experiments with W3C PROV confirm its u8lity and poten8al –  Need mul8ple interpreta8ons in mul8ple contexts 2.  The digital-social and digital-physical intersec8ons are crucial context, and automa8on is increasing –  Materiality makers 3.  Science/music as performance perspec8ve –  Common theme around the role of crea8vity.
  23. 23. Thanks to Steve Benford and Alan Chamberlain (University of Nogngham), Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller, Carolin Rindfleisch and Ségolène Tarte (University of Oxford), Mark Sandler and Geraint Wiggins (Queen Mary University London), Emily Howard (Royal Northern College of Music), Sean Bechhofer and Carole Goble (University of Manchester), Iris Garrelfs (University of the Arts London), and Jeremy Frey (University of Southampton). david.deroure@oerc.ox.ac.uk www.oerc.ox.ac.uk/people/dder @dder www.semanticaudio.ac.uk www.transforming-musicology.org www.sociam.org www.researchobject.org
  24. 24. www.oerc.ox.ac.uk david.deroure@oerc.ox.ac.uk @dder

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