Patient and Family Centered Care

3,867 views

Published on

The keynote address was delivered at the NYSAVSA Annual Conference on June 7, 2012 in Geneva, NY. The purpose of the address was 3-fold: (1) Outline what patient- and family-centered care is, its core components, and benefits; (2)Highlight some best practice volunteer programs aligned with the PFCC philosophy; (3) Provide conference participants with an assessment grid to evaluate their volunteer programming based on two PFCC standards and walk away from the presentation with concrete strategic next steps to enhance and strengthen their volunteer programming based on the PFCC model and philosophy.

Patient and Family Centered Care

  1. 1. Patient- & Family-Centered Care Doug Della Pietra Director, Customer Services & Volunteers Rochester General Hospital douglas.dellapietra@rochestergeneral.org 585-922-4328 @DougDellaPietra linkedin.com/in/dougdellapietra© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 1
  2. 2. Important: Disclaimers/Notes 1. The thoughts in this presentation are my own and not those of my employer. 2. “Patient” is a limiting designation given the many/varied healthcare settings; therefore, in this presentation, “patient” includes residents, clients and all references to those whom we serve in healthcare 3. I have attempted to footnote/reference material accurately and completely. Any errors/oversights are inadvertent. 4. This presentation is copyrighted and may only be printed for single/individual study and reference. All other uses are prohibited.© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 2
  3. 3. Perceptions of U.S. Hospitals  56% trust hospitals “somewhat,” “not much,” or “not at all”1  Hospitals  “…Transformed from charitable institutions to purely business enterprises”  “Impersonal and detached from community”  “Put economics ahead of patient care”  Abandoned “traditional role as advocates for patient needs” 1 1. Reinventing the Patient Experience. Jon B. Christianson et al. Chicago, IL: Healthcare Administration Press, 2007, 1-2.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 3
  4. 4. Healing and Curing are Not the Same  …“Mainstream health care has traditionally operated from a ‘cure’ model….”2  Curing focuses on diagnosis and treatment of “the body” as a “medical condition”  Curing focuses on the eradication of disease  Healing focuses on the whole person – mind, body and spirit – and is person/human-centered  “…The time has come to create a new model of health care delivery that makes room for both healing and cure.” 2 2. Wayne Jonas, MD, President & CEO, Samueli Institute6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 4
  5. 5. “Volunteers contribute greatly to… personalizing, humanizing, and demystifying hospitalization.”3 3. Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide, Susan Frampton, PhD et al. Derby, CT and Camden, ME: Planetree, Inc. and Picker Institute, Inc., 2008.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 5
  6. 6. Presentation Objectives  Explain Patient- and Family-Centered Care  Definition  Core Elements  Benefits  Share Best Practice Volunteer Programs  Identify Patient- and Family-Centered Care Standards  Volunteer Program Evaluation Using Patient- and Family-Centered Care Philosophy Standards© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 6
  7. 7. PATIENT- AND FAMILY- CENTERED CARE EXPLAINED6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 7
  8. 8. What Does PFCC Stand For? Patient- and Family- Centered Care6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 8
  9. 9. PFCC Philosophy  Treat patients/residents as partners in care decisions  Seeing patients/residents as unique persons  “…Guided by the needs of the patient, creating a partnership …across the continuum of care.”4  “…Ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.”5 4. Hartford Hospital’s Volunteer Handbook. 5. Sood, Gp Capt (Dr) Sanjeev. “Customer-Delight: Imperative for patient-centric care,” May 2012, Express Healthcare website. Downloaded from Express Healthcare website on Sunday, May 6, 2012 from http://www.expresshealthcare.in/201205/life01.shtml6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 9
  10. 10. PFCC Philosophy – Definition “…A philosophy of health care delivery in which the needs of patients and families come before the needs of Care Givers.”6 6. “Patient and Family Shadowing Guide: Uncovering Opportunities to Deliver Exceptional Patient and Family Care Experiences,” Anthony DiGioia III M.D., Patricia L. Embree, and Eve Shapiro. The Innovation Center, UPMC, 2010, 16.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 10
  11. 11. 10 Core Components of PFCC7 1. Human Interaction:  Patients get nurturing, compassionate, personalized care  Patients, families and the staff are supported 2. Architectural and Interior Design:  Facility is welcoming and accessible  Comfortable, familiar settings  Architectural barriers that interfere with patients control and privacy are eliminated 3. The Nutritional and Nurturing Aspects of Food:  Choice and personalized service offered in combination with sound nutritional practices 7. “10 Standards of Patient-Centered Care,” Gila Regional Medical Center website. Downloaded on Saturday, March 24, 2012 from http://www.grmc.org/Home/About-GRMC/Patient-Centered-Care.aspx6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 11
  12. 12. 10 Core Components of PFCC7 4. Information and Education:  Patients, families and the community given increased access to information  Patients educated so to participate in treatment decisions 5. Family, Friends and Social Support:  Involvement of family and others, including volunteers, in the care of patients encouraged 6. Spirituality:  Chapels, gardens, and similar made available  Chaplains included as members of the health-care team 7. “10 Standards of Patient-Centered Care,” Gila Regional Medical Center website. Downloaded on Saturday, March 24, 2012 from http://www.grmc.org/Home/About-GRMC/Patient-Centered-Care.aspx6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 12
  13. 13. 10 Core Components of PFCC7 7. Human Touch:  Therapeutic massage, foot rubs and other services to help reduce pain and stress are offered 8. Healing Arts:  Local artists, musicians, poets and storytellers involved in creating a less-clinical environment 9. Complementary Therapies:  Aromatherapy, Therapy clowns, Animal-assisted visitation/therapy, other therapies increasingly made available 10.Healthy Communities:  Expand the boundaries of healthcare by working with schools, churches, civic groups, and other community partners 7. “10 Standards of Patient-Centered Care,” Gila Regional Medical Center website. Downloaded on Saturday, March 24, 2012 from http://www.grmc.org/Home/About-GRMC/Patient-Centered-Care.aspx6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 13
  14. 14. Benefits of PFCC  Fewer medical and medication errors  Better clinical outcomes  Decreased length of stay  Increased reimbursement  Increased patient/resident satisfaction and loyalty  More referrals, increased volume  Improved bottom line for the organization© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 14
  15. 15. Benefits of PFCC (cont.)  Better patient/resident/client to provider/caregiver communication  A united care experience – rather than fragmented, siloed, isolated episodes  Improved employee morale  Decreased staff turnover; decreased nurse vacancy rate© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 15
  16. 16. Benefits of PFCC (cont.)  Most importantly, PFCC is  The right thing to do  What patients/residents/clients want© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 16
  17. 17. BEST PRACTICE VOLUNTEER PROGRAMS6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 17
  18. 18. Benefits of PFCC to Volunteers8  New and creative ways for volunteers to help  Enhance the environment of care and  Support staff in their efforts to provide personalized care  Cultivates a more engaged, loyal group of volunteers  Greater willingness and eagerness to give their time and their talents 8. Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide, Susan Frampton, PhD et al. Derby, CT and Camden, ME: Planetree, Inc. and Picker Institute, Inc., 2008, 23-24.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 18
  19. 19. Fall Prevention - Safety Monitor (“Bed Safety”) Volunteer Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 19
  20. 20. Living History Program CGH Medical Center, Sterling, Illinois6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 20
  21. 21. Friend to Friend Grocery & Pharmacy Shopping Service Program Mease Hospitals, Dunedin, FL6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 21
  22. 22. No One Dies Alone Sacred Heart Medical Center, Springfield, OR6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 22
  23. 23. Afternoon Tea - “Great idea! A gentle touch in difficult circumstances.” - “This was a very welcome respite; we just need a little break from time-to-time and this was a- “I have been waiting alone all day great excuse to leave our lovedwondering how my brother’s tests one’s room for a few minutes.are going. This was a welcome Thank you so much for doing thisdistraction. How much do I owe for us!”you for this therapy?!” Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 23
  24. 24. Extra Mile Ramp Project Southwest Georgia Council on Aging and Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital, Albany, GA6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 24
  25. 25. Volunteer Nurse Program St. Johns Mercy Medical Center, St. Louis, MO6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 25
  26. 26. Memory Bears Sharp Hospice Care, San Diego, California6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 26
  27. 27. Other Best Practice Programs Note: A list of more than twenty (20) best practice programs that model the PFCC philosophy is provided to conference participants only6/7/2012 27 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York
  28. 28. APPLYING PFCC BEST PRACTICES TO YOUR PROGRAM6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 28
  29. 29. PFCC Philosophy Standards to Evaluate Volunteer Programming Looking at each volunteer program/role, ask: 1. Does it “personalize, humanize or demystify hospitalization (healthcare experience)?” 2. Does the program/role focus volunteer resources primarily on patient and/or family needs before providers, insurance companies nurses, facilities, departments and/or volunteer needs?© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 29
  30. 30. PFCC Philosophy Assessment: Volunteer Programs/Roles Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 30
  31. 31. PFCC Philosophy Assessment: # of Volunteer Hours Per Role/Position Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 31
  32. 32. PFCC Philosophy Assessment: # of Vols Assigned Per Role/Position Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 32
  33. 33. Takeaways & Next Steps 1. Complete PFCC Assessment Grid (provided at presentation session) 2. Write a strategic plan based on  PFCC Assessment Grid  Strategic reflection/consideration questions included on the back of the PFCC Assessment Grid  Organization’s goals and strategic initiatives  Knowledge of the needs, preferences, values, and expectations of those whom you serve 3. Re-design your volunteer webpage  Use a PFCC format categorizing volunteer opportunities based “Patient-Centered,” “Family-Centered” and both6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 33
  34. 34. Takeaways & Next Steps (cont.) 4. Celebrate Patient-Centered Care Month this October 5. Focus Annual Report on PFCC Philosophy  Include breakdown of # of volunteer hours, volunteers assigned, and PFCC volunteer programs/roles 6. Form a Patient & Family Advisory Council  Use the Council to root cause various patient and family care challenges/obstacles and develop, design, prioritize and implement new volunteer programs/roles address specific patient and family needs© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 34
  35. 35. “Volunteers contribute greatly to… personalizing, humanizing, and demystifying hospitalization.”9 9. Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide, Susan Frampton, PhD et al. Derby, CT and Camden, ME: Planetree, Inc. and Picker Institute, Inc., 2008.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 35
  36. 36. THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION & CONTRIBUTION© Doug Della Pietra. All Rights Reserved. Copies may only be made for single/individual review and reference. All other uses are prohibited.6/7/2012 2012 Annual Conference, Geneva, New York 36

×