Levels of archaeological theory illustrated 2

6,038 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
6,038
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
311
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
34
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Levels of archaeological theory illustrated 2

  1. 1. Levels of Archaeological Theory<br />Low-Level—Describe Data (observation/generalization—classification)<br />Middle-Level—Describe Function (Experimental Archaeology/Ethnoarchaeology)<br />High-Level—Explain(Cultural Materialism-Processual Agenda)<br />Postprocessual Critique—Explain(Postmodernist interpretivism)<br />
  2. 2. Ancient Hoko River Fishhooks<br />Low-Level—Describe Data (observation/generalization—classification)<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
  7. 7.
  8. 8. Ancient Hoko River Baskets<br />Low-Level—Describe Data (observation/generalization—classification)<br />
  9. 9.
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
  12. 12. Basket attributes (Croes, 1977)<br />
  13. 13. Basket shapes (Croes, 1977)<br />
  14. 14. Sample basket type,<br />(Lachane, BC, ~2000 BP)<br />
  15. 15. Ancient Hoko River Fishhooks<br />Low-Level—Describe Data (observation/generalization—classification)<br />
  16. 16.
  17. 17.
  18. 18.
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
  21. 21.
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
  28. 28.
  29. 29.
  30. 30.
  31. 31.
  32. 32. Ancient Hoko River Fishhooks<br />Middle-Level—Describe Function (Experimental Archaeology/Ethnoarchaeology)<br />
  33. 33.
  34. 34.
  35. 35.
  36. 36.
  37. 37.
  38. 38.
  39. 39.
  40. 40.
  41. 41.
  42. 42.
  43. 43.
  44. 44.
  45. 45.
  46. 46.
  47. 47.
  48. 48.
  49. 49.
  50. 50.
  51. 51. Ancient Hoko River Fishhooks<br />High-Level—Explain(Cultural Materialism-Processual Agenda)<br />
  52. 52. One way (a materialist approach) to classify (separate) components of a culture<br />Infrastructure<br />Modes of Production and Reproduction<br />Structure<br />Domestic and Political Organization<br />Superstructure<br />Values and Beliefs<br />Ideational<br />Adaptive<br />
  53. 53. Musqueam NE<br />3,000 BP<br />Hoko River<br />
  54. 54.
  55. 55.
  56. 56. Basketry attribute unrooted cladogram<br />~500 BP<br />~3,000 BP<br />~2,000 BP<br />~1,000 BP<br />~3,000 BP<br />~1,000 BP<br />~1,000 BP<br />~2,000 BP<br />~2,000 BP<br />
  57. 57. Basketry Attributes<br />Rooted Cladogram<br />
  58. 58. Musqueam NE<br />Water Hazard<br />Conway<br /> Fishtown<br />Hoko River<br />Ozette<br />A<br />C<br />Biederbost<br />~3000 BP<br />~2000 BP<br />Qwu?gwes<br />~1000 BP<br />
  59. 59. Phases<br />based on stone<br />bone and shell <br />artifacts<br />Coast Salish<br />Wakashan<br />Basketry/Ethnic Traditions<br />
  60. 60. Slanted Cladogram<br />Based on basketry attributes<br />3,000 years of cultural identity through specific basketry styles for Squaxin Island Tribe and all Coast Salish Peoples<br />
  61. 61.
  62. 62. A<br />C<br />B<br />
  63. 63.
  64. 64. One way (a materialist approach) to classify (separate) components of a culture<br />Infrastructure<br />Modes of Production and Reproduction<br />Structure<br />Domestic and Political Organization<br />Superstructure<br />Values and Beliefs<br />Ideational<br />Adaptive<br />
  65. 65. Ancient Hoko River Fishhooks<br />Postprocessual Critique—Explain(Postmodernist interpretivism)<br />
  66. 66.
  67. 67.
  68. 68.
  69. 69.
  70. 70.
  71. 71.
  72. 72. Hoko River<br />Vincent Cooke<br />Excavating<br />A 3000 yr old<br />Cedar Bark<br />Cape and <br />Pack Basket<br />
  73. 73.
  74. 74.
  75. 75.
  76. 76.
  77. 77. The Post-processual critique rejects:<br />The cultural evolutionary generalizations<br />The processual search for universal laws<br />Explicitly scientific methods<br />The processual emphasis on objectivity and ethical neutrality<br />The processual view of culture as an extrasomatic means of adaptation<br />The processual emphasis on etic phenomena<br />

×