Q3 L03 Frontal Lobe

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Q3 L03 Frontal Lobe

  1. 1. THE BRAIN<br />
  2. 2. Cerebral Cortex<br />The cerebral cortex is the layer (about 1/10 inch thick) of the brain consisting of folded bulges<br />It encompasses about two-thirds of the brain mass and lies over and around most of the structures of the brain.<br />Most of the actual information processing in the brain takes place in the cerebral cortex.<br />
  3. 3. Hemispheres<br />The cerebral cortex is divided into right and left hemispheres.<br />The two hemispheres are connected by the corpus callosum.<br />
  4. 4. Lobes<br />The cerebral cortex is divided into lobes that each have a specific function. <br />
  5. 5. FRONTAL LOBE<br />
  6. 6. THE FRONTAL LOBE<br />Largest of the brain’s structures<br />Involved in a number of functions (movement, attention, planning, social skills, abstract thinking, memory and some aspects of personality)<br />
  7. 7. Interesting case study #1:Phineas Gage<br />
  8. 8. In the frontal lobe….<br />Motor cortex: initiates voluntary movement<br />The motor cortex located on the left side of the brain controls movement on the right side of the body. <br />
  9. 9. Motor Cortex<br />Cells at the top controls muscles at the bottom of the body<br />Cells at the bottom controls muscles at the top of the body<br />
  10. 10. Broca’s Area<br />Key substructure in the left frontal lobe at the base of the motor cortex.<br />Involved mainly in production of spoken and written language and language processing.<br />Damage causes Broca’s aphasia (difficulty speaking, putting together grammatical sentences and articulating words, yet comprehending language)<br />
  11. 11. Interesting Case Study #2<br />1960s – Sperry worked with split brain patients (lesion in corpus callosum)<br />Using the left hemisphere, split-brain patients could produce the name of objects held in the right hand without difficulty.<br />If they held the same object in the left hand (controlled by the right hemisphere), the object could not be named.<br />

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