Portfolios in
 Higher Education:
 Capitalizing on the
Digital and Interactive

     Darren Cambridge
      Grapevine, TX
 ...
Objectives
•  Learn about
  –  Contributions of the digital to portfolio practice
  –  Models from the Inter/National Coal...
Portfolios
•    Collection
•    Reflection
•    Selection
•    Projection
•    Connection
Contributions of the Digital
•  Easing management and archiving
•  Offering rapid feedback and facilitating
   collaborati...
Discussion

•  Easing management and         •  Are there way in which
   archiving                        you do these th...
Easing management
   and archiving
Georgia Writing Portfolio
•  Assessment of first year composition
   outcomes
•  Three essays, one revised, and cover lett...
Seton Hall First Year
•  First-year portfolio focused on
   four non-cognitive factors
   related to retention
•  Research...
Offering rapid feedback
     and facilitating
 collaborative learning
Folio Thinking at Stanford
             •  Folio thinking:
                learning principles
                and process...
Folio Thinking at
          Wolverhampton
•  Julie Hughes’ students in classroom
   placements at Wolverhampton
•  Communi...
Scaffolding the learning
        process
Learning Record Online
•  Five dimensions of learning and course goals
•  Observations and samples of work throughout
   s...
George Mason Leadership
          Portfolio
•  Leadership portfolio
   for an audience of
   their choice
•  Identity,
   ...
Beginning of Semester
•  Expanding thinking
   about evidence
•  Reflective writing in
   response to chosen
   prompts
• ...
Mid-semester
•  Reconceptualizing
   as leadership
•  Organizing evidence
   and reflections in
   relationship to
   shar...
End of Semester
•  Presentation
   portfolio for an
   audience of their
   choice
•  Identity,
   relationships,
   commu...
Matrix Thinking at Kapi’olani
•  First-year courses
•  Six native Hawaiian
   values and four stages
   of the journey of ...
Kapi’olani Research Results
•  Significant positive difference between
   ePortfolio students and college and
   national ...
Documenting and promoting
    lifewide learning
Three curricula




Kathleen Yancey, Reflection in the Writing Classroom
LaGuardia ePortfolio
          •  Recent immigrants and
             first-generation college
             students
      ...
LaGuardia CCSSE Results
              3.2


                 3


              2.8


              2.6


              2.4...
LaGuardia ePortfolio & Retention
        78
        76
        74
        72
        70
        68
        66
        64
 ...
•  Used by 60,000 residents
•  Most active users demographically representative
•  Use across roles suggests intrinsic mot...
Enabling multimedia and
 hypertextual reflection
Virginia Tech
Linking/Thinking at Clemson
              •  Psychology
                 undergraduate
                 research program
 ...
Stanford Learning Careers
An Emergent Typology of Use of
          Evidence in ePortfolios
•  Characteristics of item used as evidence
   –  Agency
...
Write about …
•  If you were a student, which model(s) would
   be most appealing?
•  Which model(s) appeal(s) most to you...
Metaphors
•  Mirror             •    Digital self
•  Map                •    Conversation piece
•  Sonnet             •   ...
Kathleen Yancey’s Dimensions
        of Reflection
   Reflection-in-action              Constructive reflection
        “r...
Network Self
 Creating intentional connections


Symphonic Self
 Achieving integrity of the whole
•  How does the portfolio model
Authenticity   •  Ownership
                                                  help student...
Electronic Portfolios 2.0:
Emergent Findings and
   Shared Questions
             •  Collection of 24
                chap...
Stay in touch
•  dcambrid@gmu.edu
•  +1-202-270-5224

•  http://ncepr.org/darren
Portfolios in Higher Education: Capitalizing on the Digital and Interactive
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Slides from a workshop given at the Dallas English Technology Forum, Grapevine, TX, March 5, 2009

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Portfolios in Higher Education: Capitalizing on the Digital and Interactive

  1. 1. Portfolios in Higher Education: Capitalizing on the Digital and Interactive Darren Cambridge Grapevine, TX March 5, 2009
  2. 2. Objectives •  Learn about –  Contributions of the digital to portfolio practice –  Models from the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research •  Reflect on these concepts and models in relationship to your own current and future work in teaching and assessment •  Identify heuristics for further exploration –  Metaphors –  Theories
  3. 3. Portfolios •  Collection •  Reflection •  Selection •  Projection •  Connection
  4. 4. Contributions of the Digital •  Easing management and archiving •  Offering rapid feedback and facilitating collaborative learning •  Scaffolding the learning process •  Documenting and promoting lifewide learning •  Enabling multimedia and hypertextual reflection
  5. 5. Discussion •  Easing management and •  Are there way in which archiving you do these things now? •  Offering rapid feedback and What are their strengths facilitating collaborative and limitations? learning •  Which of these •  Scaffolding the learning capabilities might help process you reaching an objective •  Documenting and promoting lifewide learning you have in your courses •  Enabling multimedia and or program? hypertextual reflection
  6. 6. Easing management and archiving
  7. 7. Georgia Writing Portfolio •  Assessment of first year composition outcomes •  Three essays, one revised, and cover letter •  Collected and analyzed through <emma>
  8. 8. Seton Hall First Year •  First-year portfolio focused on four non-cognitive factors related to retention •  Research demonstrates all four factors predict persistence and success (GPA) beyond otherwise available data •  Social integration and quality of effort most significant  new curricular emphasis
  9. 9. Offering rapid feedback and facilitating collaborative learning
  10. 10. Folio Thinking at Stanford •  Folio thinking: learning principles and processes associated with portfolios •  Reflective “Idealogs” composed throughout the semester •  Wikis and blogs
  11. 11. Folio Thinking at Wolverhampton •  Julie Hughes’ students in classroom placements at Wolverhampton •  Community of practice through blogging •  “Everyday theorizing”
  12. 12. Scaffolding the learning process
  13. 13. Learning Record Online •  Five dimensions of learning and course goals •  Observations and samples of work throughout semester •  Interpretation and grade recommendations at middle and end •  Midterm moderations
  14. 14. George Mason Leadership Portfolio •  Leadership portfolio for an audience of their choice •  Identity, relationships, community, future directions •  Portfolio using template; matrix “pre-writing”
  15. 15. Beginning of Semester •  Expanding thinking about evidence •  Reflective writing in response to chosen prompts •  Organized around categories for social change model of leadership
  16. 16. Mid-semester •  Reconceptualizing as leadership •  Organizing evidence and reflections in relationship to shared conceptual framework •  Matrix Thinking
  17. 17. End of Semester •  Presentation portfolio for an audience of their choice •  Identity, relationships, community, future directions •  Portfolio using template
  18. 18. Matrix Thinking at Kapi’olani •  First-year courses •  Six native Hawaiian values and four stages of the journey of a canoe •  Impact on student engagement and learning strategies
  19. 19. Kapi’olani Research Results •  Significant positive difference between ePortfolio students and college and national benchmarks for –  Student engagement •  Six of twelve CCSSE questions –  Learning strategies •  Eight of ten Learning Strategies and Study Skills (LASSI) categories
  20. 20. Documenting and promoting lifewide learning
  21. 21. Three curricula Kathleen Yancey, Reflection in the Writing Classroom
  22. 22. LaGuardia ePortfolio •  Recent immigrants and first-generation college students •  Bridging home and disciplinary culture •  Impact on retention, student engagement, grades •  Portfolio studios •  Visual design and iteration
  23. 23. LaGuardia CCSSE Results 3.2 3 2.8 2.6 2.4 Nat'l Mean LaG Mean eP Mean 2.67 2.85 3.12 Critical Thinking How much has your coursework emphasized synthesizing & organizing ideas, information, or experiences in new ways? 1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3= Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much
  24. 24. LaGuardia ePortfolio & Retention 78 76 74 72 70 68 66 64 Fa05->Sp06 Sp06-> Fa06 2 Smstr Mean 71 69 70 College 76.5 74.7 75.5 ePortfolio
  25. 25. •  Used by 60,000 residents •  Most active users demographically representative •  Use across roles suggests intrinsic motivation and lifelong learning •  Integration of different life roles in single representation with user control over contents and visual design key success factor
  26. 26. Enabling multimedia and hypertextual reflection
  27. 27. Virginia Tech
  28. 28. Linking/Thinking at Clemson •  Psychology undergraduate research program •  Complexity of arrangement mirrors sophistication of disciplinary and professional identity
  29. 29. Stanford Learning Careers
  30. 30. An Emergent Typology of Use of Evidence in ePortfolios •  Characteristics of item used as evidence –  Agency –  Media •  Purpose of incorporating evidence –  Rhetorical Function –  Object •  Characteristics of associated learning activities –  Sponsorship –  Participation
  31. 31. Write about … •  If you were a student, which model(s) would be most appealing? •  Which model(s) appeal(s) most to you as an educator? •  Which best match current or anticipated practice in your classroom, program, or institution? •  What challenges might you anticipate if you were to build on one of these models?
  32. 32. Metaphors •  Mirror •  Digital self •  Map •  Conversation piece •  Sonnet •  Museum exhibit - Mary Dietz •  Interface •  Test Which metaphors •  Story appeal the most -Helen Barrett to you?
  33. 33. Kathleen Yancey’s Dimensions of Reflection Reflection-in-action Constructive reflection “reviewing, “developing a cumulative, projecting, multi-selved, revising” multi-vocal identity” Reflection-in-presentation Reflection as conversation “articulating the relationships with artifacts, between and among” creation, with self, creator, and context of creation with others (— Yancey, Reflection in the Writing Classroom)
  34. 34. Network Self Creating intentional connections Symphonic Self Achieving integrity of the whole
  35. 35. •  How does the portfolio model Authenticity •  Ownership help students articulate their Validation through reflexivity self-understanding? •  Creativity Articulation the inchoate self through reflection •  How can the way portfolios are Deliberation Decisions made through evaluated be defined by and discussion that involve everyone affected? • Is reasonable •  How do we ensure that the • Is inclusive information about learning that • Takes into account information informs such decisions is broad from all enough to take advantage of • Allows for both consensus and individual differences? dissent •  How does the portfolio help Consistency of values and Integrity students represent their identity articulation of relationship as “whole human beings”? between • How does it invite connections •  Different spheres of life with learning beyond the context •  Different social roles of the course, discipline or institution?
  36. 36. Electronic Portfolios 2.0: Emergent Findings and Shared Questions •  Collection of 24 chapters detailing research from cohorts I, II, and III of the Coalition •  Out next week from Stylus
  37. 37. Stay in touch •  dcambrid@gmu.edu •  +1-202-270-5224 •  http://ncepr.org/darren

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