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Daniel Burka
           creative director at Digg
co-founder and designer of Pownce
             partner at silverorange
Photo credit: Me
Designing for interaction
   Interfaces for socializing




                                                Daniel Burka
 ...
Challenge #1

Encourage people
to participate
Credit: Flickr user ‘inoxkrow’




Increase benefit
Go beyond altruistic motivations
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
Designing for Interaction
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Designing for Interaction

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Creating a social site sounds great until you get around to actually designing that ambiguous ‘social’ part that’s central to its success. Enabling and encouraging your community to participate is a complex challenge that only gets more sophisticated as the populace on your site grows. In many critical areas, you’ll come up against the curious juxtapositions of designing social interactions. Encouraging positive activities while discouraging negative behaviors, satisfying power users while catering to lurkers, ensuring privacy while fostering openness, and creating pathways while remaining open to unexpected developments, are just some of the hurdles you’re likely to face as you design your site.

Using case studies from Digg, Pownce, and other social communities, we’ll examine how to balance these and other concerns from a user interface design perspective. In particular, mistakes will be analyzed and success stories will be dissected to help explain how successful social interactions can be created and pitfalls can be avoided.

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Designing for Interaction

  1. Daniel Burka creative director at Digg co-founder and designer of Pownce partner at silverorange
  2. Photo credit: Me
  3. Designing for interaction Interfaces for socializing Daniel Burka Creative director at Digg Co-founder and designer of Pownce Photo credit: Partner at silverorange Flickr user Ted Abbott
  4. Challenge #1 Encourage people to participate
  5. Credit: Flickr user ‘inoxkrow’ Increase benefit Go beyond altruistic motivations
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Creating a social site sounds great until you get around to actually designing that ambiguous ‘social’ part that’s central to its success. Enabling and encouraging your community to participate is a complex challenge that only gets more sophisticated as the populace on your site grows. In many critical areas, you’ll come up against the curious juxtapositions of designing social interactions. Encouraging positive activities while discouraging negative behaviors, satisfying power users while catering to lurkers, ensuring privacy while fostering openness, and creating pathways while remaining open to unexpected developments, are just some of the hurdles you’re likely to face as you design your site. Using case studies from Digg, Pownce, and other social communities, we’ll examine how to balance these and other concerns from a user interface design perspective. In particular, mistakes will be analyzed and success stories will be dissected to help explain how successful social interactions can be created and pitfalls can be avoided.

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