Daniel Burka's Design Workshop Slides: FOWD NYC 2009

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Daniel Burka's Design Workshop Slides: FOWD NYC 2009

  1. I’m dburka digg flickr twitter clustershot last.fm deltatangobravo.com daniel@deltatangobravo.com
  2. What do I do? Co-founder silverorange, creative dir. Digg, co-founder Pownce, dir. of design Tiny Speck
  3. What’s a web designer? UX, IA, Interaction designer, Creative Dir, Prod. manager, Designer, Webmaster
  4. What do you do? Designer, developer, product, entrepreneur, something else? In-house or freelance? Big, medium, little, lone gun? Love it, like it, hate it, or meh? Credit: “The 56 Geeks” by Scott Johnson, myextralife.com
  5. Working titles Design lessons learned in the trenches A (semi-organized) brain dump of current design challenges Stuff we got right and wrong (and what we’re doing about it) Making complex things simpler Credit: Flickr user ‘justin0842’
  6. Ground rules Ask questions anytime... yell out if I don’t see your hand It’s more important to elaborate than to cover everything @reply me @dburka with things to cover if you’re not an out loud person
  7. Today’s agenda A. Get the basics out of the way 1. Designing for engagement 2. Positive behaviors by design 4 of 5? 3. Handling (lots of) user feedback 4. Making complex interactions feel simple 4. Iterative design strategies + a case study What else do you want to discuss? Credit: Flickr user S.O.F.T.
  8. Challenges 1. Encouraging people to participate 2. Promoting positive participation 3. Handling (lots of) user feedback 4. Making complex interactions feel simple 5. Managing change - Iterative design strategies
  9. Joshua Porter (bokardo) “You probably have a community whether you know it or not.” Via ChinPosin.com
  10. How do your people participate? Different sites have different issues
  11. Reduce the barrier to entry Simplify sign-up Credit: Flickr user ‘notsogoodphotography’
  12. Dip a toe in the water Get going quickly and get invested quickly Credit: Flickr user ‘notsogoodphotography’
  13. Even as far as anonymity? How much do you really need to know? Credit: Flickr user ‘Photo Monkey’
  14. E-commerce example
  15. Start simple Easier to grok, more engaging
  16. Show, don’t tell Showing is much more enticing (usually)
  17. Increase benefit Go beyond altruistic motivations Credit: Flickr user ‘inoxkrow’
  18. ?
  19. Challenges 1. Encouraging people to participate 2. Promoting positive participation 3. Handling (lots of) user feedback 4. Making complex interactions feel simple 5. Managing change - Iterative design strategies
  20. Personal profiles Encourage trust and connections Credit: Flickr user ‘mrclean’
  21. Focus on tension points Copy and design can go a long way Credit: Flickr user ‘sarahkim’
  22. Avoid negative competition ‘King of the hill’ contests don’t scale Credit: Flickr user ‘cmichel67’
  23. • Too basic, too static • Frustrating to climb ladder once others established Constop users list at any cost Digg • • Taps into negative self-interest as well Cutthroats climb ladder • Creates very influential users
  24. • Easy to understand: simple sum • Fantastic incentive to participate at the beginning Pros top users listwhen benefit is low Digg • • Taps into peoples’ self-interest in a positive way Healthy competition • Creates recognizable ‘celebrity’ contributors
  25. Digg top users list Possible improvements?
  26. Keep it positive Seems simple, but it’s difficult to stay focused on it
  27. Focus on the individual Award individuals for personal accomplishments
  28. Self-policing Empower users to take care of issues themselves
  29. Digg comment reporting and voting down
  30. ?
  31. Challenges 1. Encouraging people to participate 2. Promoting positive participation 3. Handling (lots of) user feedback 4. Making complex interactions feel simple 5. Managing change - Iterative design strategies
  32. Mozilla.org Public site redesign in 2004
  33. I don't like it a bit. What was wrong with the current one?
  34. I don't like it a bit. What was wrong with the current one? Looks like your average small company website.
  35. I don't like it a bit. What was wrong with the current one? Looks like your average small company website. Keep the old colors and ditch the new ones. It's too depressing.
  36. I don't like it a bit. What was wrong with the current one? Looks like your average small company website. Keep the old colors and ditch the new ones. It's too depressing. IMHO the current design looks MUCH better than this mess.
  37. Feedback is more than ‘Good’ or ‘Bad’
  38. Collecting feedback How do you collect feedback?
  39. Off the top of my head Collecting Pownce, silverorange feedback Feedback at Digg, Email Twitter, blogs, etc Comments! Press Focus groups Phone Stats Forums Conferences Parties! Townhalls Internal conversations Task analysis
  40. Established vs Young Experiences with the Digg and Pownce communities via AlphaTangoBravo / Adam Baker
  41. Young vs Established • Pownce was relatively young • ~270,000 users • Just over a year and a half old • Digg is relatively old • ~3+ million users and 30+ million uniques/month • Almost 4 years old
  42. Young vs Established • Feedback has less volume • Less feedback is easier to parse • Less feedback makes it harder to find patterns • People feel connected to the site’s growth • Positive, energetic, forgiving • Nimble and responsive site
  43. Young vs Established • Feedback has more volume • Difficult to parse and handle • Patterns are less prone to error • People have invested themselves • Patterns and familiarities have formed • Self aware communities and cliques exist • Expectations of performance have been created • And, your business may be slower too...
  44. Types of feedback a Types of feedback • Different types require different responses, carry different weights
  45. Types of feedback a Positive feedback “ The new stuff looks great!! Now I know what you’ve been working so hard on!!! Dad “ Wow, this is so much better than the old design. Now that I’ve had a chance to use it, I love it. Thanks.
  46. Types of feedback a Bug reports “ When I select a username I get a 404 error. Can you guys look into it? “ The thing jumps around after I click on the other thing. It’s annoying. Please fix it, thanks.
  47. Types of feedback a Negative feedback “ I want it to be like it was before... “ I hate it! (the designer should be fired!!) “ It doesn’t do something I need... “ It would be easy just to... “ It’s ok, but what took so long?
  48. Types of feedback a Expert feedback “ I am going to both share my opinion on what the problems are and actually address them...
  49. Types of feedback a Implicit feedback • Observing user behavior • Objective metrics • Speaks for the non-commenters • People don’t do what they say • Digg commenters are typical of this: “That’s why I never come here anymore”!!
  50. Reacting to feedback b Reacting to feedback • First step: Don’t do anything! • Immediate reaction will be to go back to the old way • Hesitate to create a ‘back’ switch • Don’t paint yourself into corners • Don’t end up implementing a patchy fix instead of seeing the problem
  51. Reacting to feedback b Reacting to feedback • Wait for a period and then collect the feedback • Identify themes and strong ideas • Try to make quantifiable judgements • Cherry pick great ideas (especially from experts!) • Take implicit feedback seriously... could be the opposite of the explicit feedback
  52. c Extreme feedback Handling the extremes Riots, petitions, mass-defection threats, etc. • Take feedback seriously, but don’t sway your vision and don’t panic • BE AS HONEST AS YOU CAN BE • You don’t have to go into technical specifics, but... • Don’t be unnecessarily vague • Try (key word!) to get out in front of issues...
  53. ?
  54. Challenges 1. Encouraging people to participate 2. Promoting positive participation 3. Handling (lots of) user feedback 4. Making complex interactions feel simple 5. Managing change - Iterative design strategies
  55. Required reading....
  56. Focus on THE thing Why are people REALLY on your site or this page? Credit: Flickr user ‘ihtatho’
  57. Remove as much as you can Is something REALLY necessary? Often a tough debate. Credit: Flickr user ‘pgoyette’
  58. Hide what you can’t remove Contextual links and secondary content are candidates Credit: Flickr user ‘aftab’
  59. Give options in sequence Only an option for logical sequences – handy sometimes Credit: Flickr user ‘ r o s e n d a h l’
  60. Strongly consider flow You don’t need eye-tracking software to remove impediments Credit: Flickr user ‘Mister V’
  61. by dburka 20 minutes ago Of course, what McCain is trying to avoid anyone noticing is that the problem isn't regulators failing to do their job; it's that that man he tapped to write his economic policy - Phil Gramm - removed oversight of the instruments that are laying waste to the finance sector from the regulators' job descriptions. Reply to this comment by marktrammell 16 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road. 5 Replies to this comment by dburka 14 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road. 5 Replies to this comment by kurtwilms 12 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road.
  62. ? ?? ? ? ? ?
  63. Challenges 1. Encouraging people to participate 2. Promoting positive participation 3. Handling (lots of) user feedback 4. Making complex interactions feel simple 5. Managing change - Iterative design strategies
  64. Your website sucks Trust me, it could be a lot better Photo Credit: Flickr user d-a-n-i-e-l
  65. Dear Digg, Go fuck yourself. Your pal, — J.G.
  66. Photo Credit: Joi Ito “If you review your first site version and don’t feel embarrassment, you spent too much time on it.” Reid Hoffman, LinkedIn
  67. Take chances and release Build with the expectation of change Listen and iterate
  68. Read this book... How buildings learn: What happens after they’re built Stewart Brand
  69. High road architecture
  70. Low road architecture
  71. Build a castle in no time!
  72. Credit: Phil Gyford Desire paths Don’t try to predict everything
  73. Adapt to scale This is a wonderful problem to have, don’t over-solve for it
  74. Credit: kimballhoman Realign, don’t redesign Cameron Moll is awfully clever... read it on A List Apart
  75. Subtraction is iteration too Try to remove as much as you add – don’t be afraid to prune Credit: Rev Dan Catt
  76. xx x x x x
  77. Credit: Flickr user ‘Paulgi’ Really listen to your users Both explicit and implicit feedback are crucial Communication is the key to every good relationship
  78. A case study Digg comments
  79. Step 1 We got it out there
  80. Step 2 We added sophistication
  81. by dburka 20 minutes ago Of course, what McCain is trying to avoid anyone noticing is that the problem isn't regulators failing to do their job; it's that that man he tapped to write his economic policy - Phil Gramm - removed oversight of the instruments that are laying waste to the finance sector from the regulators' job descriptions. Reply to this comment by marktrammell 16 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road. 5 Replies to this comment by dburka 14 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road. Step 3 5 Replies to this comment by kurtwilms 12 minutes ago We started revising We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road. Reply to this comment by kevinrose 10 minutes ago
  82. Establish goals Add multiple levels of nesting Reduce complexity of nesting Discourage top-posting Increase participation Improve quality of discussions Address scaling issues Make things feel simpler & improve interactions
  83. instruments that are laying waste to the finance sector from the regulators' job descriptions. Reply to this comment by marktrammell 16 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road. 5 Replies to this comment by dburka 14 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road. 5 Replies to this comment by kurtwilms 12 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out the finance sector. You would think they would have brought in someone with substance when Phil hit the road. Reply to this comment by kevinrose 10 minutes ago We all know McCain is incompetent when it comes to the economy, and that Phil Gramm sold out
  84. Measure success Add multiple levels of nesting Reduce complexity of nesting Discourage top-posting Increase participation Improve quality of discussions Address scaling issues Make things feel simpler & improve interactions
  85. One long year... ( I’m sorry ) Credit: Flickr user xjrlokix
  86. Then we got it right Well... sort of
  87. Gather feedback Explicit and implicit
  88. Set new goals (Idea is to avoid feature creep and gauge success) Make things feel simpler & improve interactions Improve performance Add most requested functionality
  89. Create some comps Somewhere to start discussion
  90. User test #1 Focus group novices and experts
  91. Ask for more feedback Really? Yes.
  92. Create refined comps In this case html/css/js comps
  93. Implement Work closely with the development team
  94. User test #2 Perform task analysis
  95. Launch it! It works? It works!
  96. Achieved goals? Make things feel simpler & improve interactions Improve performance Add most requested functionality
  97. Still weak for casual visitors Scales technically, but not socially Pseudo-pagination is cool, but not great Hard to keep up-to-date with your conversations Onerous registration to comment Done? Nope Start on next iterations
  98. Stay fit: adapt to survive and thrive If iterative design isn’t instinctual, be convincing
  99. In summary.... Don’t try to build a perfect product, you can’t Build on flexible technologies and leave room for adaptation Embrace unpredicted activities Think twice before starting from scratch Subtraction is iteration too Listen, listen, listen. Before, during, after. Plan to iterate.
  100. Your issues... What’s been challenging you lately?
  101. I’m dburka digg flickr twitter clustershot last.fm deltatangobravo.com daniel@deltatangobravo.com

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