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Cubism              (1907-1914)  Krista Arrasmith, Sean Larson, Leah Schrauben
   This movement was created by Picasso    and Braque in Paris from 1907 to 1914    ◦ Braque and Picasso were the major a...
   Influences on Cubism    ◦ Primitivism and Non-Western Sources    ◦ Oceanic and Iberian Sculpture    ◦ African Art in t...
Les Demoiselles d’Avigon (Picasso, 1907)
   Overall Characteristics    ◦ Reject that art should copy nature    ◦ Reject use of traditional techniques    ◦ Emphasi...
   Cubism consisted of two stages    ◦ Analytical- Very abstract; mostly made up of      overlapping planes and geometric...
Analytical Cubism       (1907-1912)
   Style    ◦ Mostly landscapes, few figures (simple      subjects)    ◦ Noticeable lack of color    ◦ Earth tones    ◦ C...
Portrait of Ambrose Vollard (Picasso,1910)
Portrait of Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (Picasso,1910)
Ma Jolie (Picasso, 1910)
The Portugese (man) (Braque,1911)
Synthetic Cubism      (1912-1914)
   Style    ◦   Vibrant colors    ◦   Collage created    ◦   Different materials than just canvas    ◦   Referred to as b...
Guitar (Picasso, 1913)
The Card-Player (Picasso,1913-1914)
Fruit and Jug on a Table (Metzinger, 1916) (Cubistversion of Cezanne’s piece)
The Smoker (Gris, 1913)
Stairway (Léger, 1914)
Harlequin (Picasso, 1915)
Major Cubist Artists
   Pablo Picasso    ◦ Style      Brighter Colors      Less Abstracted      Many Paintings are Still-Lifes or Self-Port...
Self Portrait (1907)
Bread and Fruit Dish on a Table (1909)
   Georges Braque    ◦ Style      Not Very Abstracted      Mostly Earthy Colors (Browns, Greens, Blacks)      Many Pai...
   Braque (cont.)    ◦ Famous Cubist Works (cont.)      Le Sacré-Couer (1910)      El Violín (1911)      The Portugese...
El Viaducto de L’Estaque (1907)
Castle at La Roche-Guyon (1909)
The Musican’s Table (1913)
   Jean Metzinger    ◦ Style      Darker Colors (Darker Blues, Greens, and       Browns)      Many paintings of scenes ...
At the Cycle-Race Track (1912)
Dancer in the Café (1912)
Still-Life: Playing Cards, Coffee Cup, and Apples
   Fernand Léger    ◦ Style      Brighter Colors      More Rounded Geometric Shapes      Highly Abstracted      Most ...
Smoke (1912)
Contrast of Forms (1913)
El Despertador (1914)
   Juan Gris    ◦ Style      More Earthy Colors (Greens, Browns, Blues)      Highly Abstracted      Mostly of Still-Li...
Beer Glass and Cards (1913)
Flowers (1914)
A Pot of Geraniums (1915)
   Roger de La Fresnaye    ◦ Style      Brighter Colors (Yellows, Whites, Blues)      Not Very Abstracted      Most Pa...
Village at the Water’s Edge (1910)
Artillery (1911)
The Conquest of the Air (1913)
   Marcel Duchamp    ◦ Style      Earthy Colors (Browns, Blacks)      Highly Abstracted      Many Pieces Try to Captur...
Nude, Sad Young Man on a Train (1911)
Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 (1912)
The Passage From Virgin to Bride (1912)
   Albert Gleizes    ◦ Style      Mix of Earthy Colors and Vibrant Colors      Many Pieces are Landscapes      Highly ...
Catedral (1912)
Paisaje (1914)
Nueva York (1916)
Cubist Sculpture
   Alexander Archipenko    ◦ Style      Mostly dark colors (Blacks)      Not very abstracted      Mostly contorted or ...
   Archipenko (cont.)    ◦ Famous Cubist Works (cont.)      Female Torso (1914)      Woman Combing Her Hair (1915)     ...
The Draped Woman (1911)
The Gondolier (1914)
The Boxers (1914)
   Raymond Duchamp-Villon    ◦ Style      Mostly Darker Colors (Blacks)      Very Abstracted      Mostly of Parts of H...
The Lovers (1913)
The Horse (1914)
Portrait of Professor Gosset (1917)
   Jacques Lipchitz    ◦ Style      Use Bland Colors (Whites, Metallics)      Highly Abstracted      Mostly of Humans ...
Man With a Guitar (1915)
The Bather (1925)
Off-branches of Cubism
   Kinetic Cubism/Cubo-Futurism    ◦ Developed in Russia around 1910    ◦ Based off of Synthetic Cubism/ reinterpretation...
   Orphism/Orphic Cubism (1910)    ◦ Roots in Analytical Cubism but uses bright      circles    ◦ Delaunays pioneered thi...
   All pics from abcgallery.com and all-    art.org
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Cubism powerpoint

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Cubism powerpoint

  1. 1. Cubism (1907-1914) Krista Arrasmith, Sean Larson, Leah Schrauben
  2. 2.  This movement was created by Picasso and Braque in Paris from 1907 to 1914 ◦ Braque and Picasso were the major artists throughout the majority of the Cubist movement ◦ The term Cubism was first coined by Louis Vauxcelles after seeing the landscapes Braque painted at L’Estaque, in 1908, calling the geometric figures in the paintings “cubes.”
  3. 3.  Influences on Cubism ◦ Primitivism and Non-Western Sources ◦ Oceanic and Iberian Sculpture ◦ African Art in the case of Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon ◦ Colonialism/Imperialism ◦ World War I ◦ Post-Impressionism: Cézanne ◦ Science-Bohr, Einstein
  4. 4. Les Demoiselles d’Avigon (Picasso, 1907)
  5. 5.  Overall Characteristics ◦ Reject that art should copy nature ◦ Reject use of traditional techniques ◦ Emphasize two-dimensionality (geometricity) ◦ Reduce objects to geometric shapes and put these within a shallow space ◦ Multiple/contrasting vantage points ◦ Overlapping planes (passage) ◦ Exploration of the fourth dimension (simultaneity)
  6. 6.  Cubism consisted of two stages ◦ Analytical- Very abstract; mostly made up of overlapping planes and geometrical figures ◦ Synthetic- tended to use new mediums, such as clips from newspaper, on top of paint canvass; took away all three dimensional aspects left from Analytical
  7. 7. Analytical Cubism (1907-1912)
  8. 8.  Style ◦ Mostly landscapes, few figures (simple subjects) ◦ Noticeable lack of color ◦ Earth tones ◦ Colors or tones with neutral associations
  9. 9. Portrait of Ambrose Vollard (Picasso,1910)
  10. 10. Portrait of Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (Picasso,1910)
  11. 11. Ma Jolie (Picasso, 1910)
  12. 12. The Portugese (man) (Braque,1911)
  13. 13. Synthetic Cubism (1912-1914)
  14. 14.  Style ◦ Vibrant colors ◦ Collage created ◦ Different materials than just canvas ◦ Referred to as blunt and straightforward ◦ Considered “easy to read”
  15. 15. Guitar (Picasso, 1913)
  16. 16. The Card-Player (Picasso,1913-1914)
  17. 17. Fruit and Jug on a Table (Metzinger, 1916) (Cubistversion of Cezanne’s piece)
  18. 18. The Smoker (Gris, 1913)
  19. 19. Stairway (Léger, 1914)
  20. 20. Harlequin (Picasso, 1915)
  21. 21. Major Cubist Artists
  22. 22.  Pablo Picasso ◦ Style  Brighter Colors  Less Abstracted  Many Paintings are Still-Lifes or Self-Portraits ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Self Portrait (1907)  Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907)  Dryad (1908)  Bread and Fruit Dish on a Table (1909)  Portrait of Ambroise Vollard (1910)  Guitar (1913)  Three Musicians (1921)
  23. 23. Self Portrait (1907)
  24. 24. Bread and Fruit Dish on a Table (1909)
  25. 25.  Georges Braque ◦ Style  Not Very Abstracted  Mostly Earthy Colors (Browns, Greens, Blacks)  Many Paintings are Landscapes ◦ Famous Cubist Works  El Viaducto de L’Estaque (1907)  Viaduct at L’Estaque (1908)  Paisaje de L’Estaque (1908)  Gran Desnudo (1908)  Castle at La Roche-Guyon (1909)  El Parque de Carrières Saint-Denis (1909)  Harbor in Normandy (1909)
  26. 26.  Braque (cont.) ◦ Famous Cubist Works (cont.)  Le Sacré-Couer (1910)  El Violín (1911)  The Portugese (Man) (1911-1912)  The Musician’s Table (1913)  Still-Life: Le Jour (1929)
  27. 27. El Viaducto de L’Estaque (1907)
  28. 28. Castle at La Roche-Guyon (1909)
  29. 29. The Musican’s Table (1913)
  30. 30.  Jean Metzinger ◦ Style  Darker Colors (Darker Blues, Greens, and Browns)  Many paintings of scenes of life invovling humans  Not Very Abstracted ◦ Famous Cubist Works  At the Cycle-Race Track (1912)  Dancer in a Café (1912)  The Smoker (1914)  Fruit and Jug on a Table (1916)  Naturaleza Muerta (1919)  Still-Life: Playing Cards, Coffee Cup, and Apples
  31. 31. At the Cycle-Race Track (1912)
  32. 32. Dancer in the Café (1912)
  33. 33. Still-Life: Playing Cards, Coffee Cup, and Apples
  34. 34.  Fernand Léger ◦ Style  Brighter Colors  More Rounded Geometric Shapes  Highly Abstracted  Most Paintings of People Doing Different Tasks ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Desnudos en el Bosque (1909)  Smoke (1912)  Woman in Blue (1912)  Contrast of Forms (1913)  El Despertador (1914)  Segundo Estado (1914)
  35. 35. Smoke (1912)
  36. 36. Contrast of Forms (1913)
  37. 37. El Despertador (1914)
  38. 38.  Juan Gris ◦ Style  More Earthy Colors (Greens, Browns, Blues)  Highly Abstracted  Mostly of Still-Life ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Beer Glass and Cards (1913)  Flowers (1914)  Breakfast (1914)  A Pot of Geraniums (1915)
  39. 39. Beer Glass and Cards (1913)
  40. 40. Flowers (1914)
  41. 41. A Pot of Geraniums (1915)
  42. 42.  Roger de La Fresnaye ◦ Style  Brighter Colors (Yellows, Whites, Blues)  Not Very Abstracted  Most Paintings of Humans ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Village at the Water’s Edge (1910) (has definite similarites to Impressionism)  Artillery (1911)  The Conquest of the Air (1913)  Sitzendy Man (1914)  Smoking in the Shelter (1918)
  43. 43. Village at the Water’s Edge (1910)
  44. 44. Artillery (1911)
  45. 45. The Conquest of the Air (1913)
  46. 46.  Marcel Duchamp ◦ Style  Earthy Colors (Browns, Blacks)  Highly Abstracted  Many Pieces Try to Capture Movement of Nudes ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Apropos of Little Sister (1911)  Nude, Sad Young Man on a Train (1911)  Nude descending a Staircase, No. 2 (1912)  The Passage From Virgin to Bride (1912)  The King and Queen Surrounded by Swift Nudes (1912)  Die Verheiratete Frau (1912)
  47. 47. Nude, Sad Young Man on a Train (1911)
  48. 48. Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 (1912)
  49. 49. The Passage From Virgin to Bride (1912)
  50. 50.  Albert Gleizes ◦ Style  Mix of Earthy Colors and Vibrant Colors  Many Pieces are Landscapes  Highly Abstracted ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Catedral (1912)  Puerto Comercial (1912)  Cabeza Masculina (1913)  Paisaje (1914)  Nueva York (1916)
  51. 51. Catedral (1912)
  52. 52. Paisaje (1914)
  53. 53. Nueva York (1916)
  54. 54. Cubist Sculpture
  55. 55.  Alexander Archipenko ◦ Style  Mostly dark colors (Blacks)  Not very abstracted  Mostly contorted or misshapen human bodies ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Seated Female Nude (1909)  The Draped Woman (1911)  Reclining Nude (1912)  Die Sitzende (1912)  Carrousel Pierrot (1913)  The Gondolier (1914)  The Boxers (1914)  Walking (1914)
  56. 56.  Archipenko (cont.) ◦ Famous Cubist Works (cont.)  Female Torso (1914)  Woman Combing Her Hair (1915)  Walking Soilders (1917)
  57. 57. The Draped Woman (1911)
  58. 58. The Gondolier (1914)
  59. 59. The Boxers (1914)
  60. 60.  Raymond Duchamp-Villon ◦ Style  Mostly Darker Colors (Blacks)  Very Abstracted  Mostly of Parts of Humans or Animals ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Torso of a Young Man (1910)  The Lovers (1913)  The Horse (1914)  Portrait of Professor Gosset (1917)
  61. 61. The Lovers (1913)
  62. 62. The Horse (1914)
  63. 63. Portrait of Professor Gosset (1917)
  64. 64.  Jacques Lipchitz ◦ Style  Use Bland Colors (Whites, Metallics)  Highly Abstracted  Mostly of Humans ◦ Famous Cubist Works  Man With a Guitar (1915)  The Bather (1925)
  65. 65. Man With a Guitar (1915)
  66. 66. The Bather (1925)
  67. 67. Off-branches of Cubism
  68. 68.  Kinetic Cubism/Cubo-Futurism ◦ Developed in Russia around 1910 ◦ Based off of Synthetic Cubism/ reinterpretation of French Cubism and Italian Futurism ◦ More emphasis on movement and action ◦ Bold colors and lines ◦ Fragmentation of objects on canvas surface ◦ Key artists:  Malevich  Popova  Goncharova
  69. 69.  Orphism/Orphic Cubism (1910) ◦ Roots in Analytical Cubism but uses bright circles ◦ Delaunays pioneered this technique (Prisma Electrico, Rythme Couleur, ect.)
  70. 70.  All pics from abcgallery.com and all- art.org

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