GlobalNet21 webinar February 28 2012                    Can social networking help create a network of                    ...
We won’t do it by          • Building (yet another) civil society online platform          • Expecting volunteer local blo...
National - local                                                                                                          ...
Still many hierarchies loosely joined                                                   Developing a social innovation net...
If we want more connection and                     collaboration we need                     • Networky attitudes         ...
Collaborative attitudes and behaviours                                                      Collaboration pyramid Oscar Be...
somehow pointless - a bit like tryingmeasures may art orabstruse and complicated but are the                              ...
More sociable organisations                                                                     Curate                    ...
Finding a personal approach to networking        Mine is social reporting                                                 ...
A few questions                    • What works for activists (and you)?                    • Should we focus more on mobi...
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Strengthening Civil Society Through Social Media: with notes

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Presentation for 21st century network, February 28 2012. With notes
At times of financial restraint and when Governments are looking at how civil society can be recruited to deliver on their own agenda then how can we ensure that the many associations that make up civil society can protect their independence. Can social networking help create a network of mutual independence that strengthens the countless groups that are the social glue of our civil society?
http://www.meetup.com/21stCenturyNetwork/events/41358702/

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Strengthening Civil Society Through Social Media: with notes

  1. 1. GlobalNet21 webinar February 28 2012 Can social networking help create a network of mutual independence that strengthens the countless groups that are the social glue of our civil society? Maybe - but how? And who? David Wilcox socialreporter.com using some ideas from Drew Mackie Joe Taylor to bring us down to earthTuesday, 28 February 12The intro to the webinar http://www.meetup.com/21stCenturyNetwork/events/41358702/At times of financial restraint and when Governments are looking at how civil society can be recruited to deliver on their own agenda then how can we ensure thatthe many associations that make up civil society can protect their independence. Can social networking help create a network of mutual independence thatstrengthens the countless groups that are the social glue of our civil society? This is the topic of this webinar.How do we develop social networking so that groups can have an influence and make a difference? Is it sufficient to just set up a meetup site or a NING site forexample and then hope that it will take off into cyberspace and be successful. What more do we need to do to reach wider audiences and particularly vulnerableand marginalized groups that do not always join into existing online communities?In this webinar we will look at how one umbrella group NatCAN (The National Community Activist Network) has used social networking to involve community andactivist groups through the NING platform and they will discuss how successful this has been and what more needs to be done. Joe Taylor of NatCAN will presentthis part of the webinar. http://nationalcan.ning.com/David Wilcox will then discuss how successful this approach is in reaching out to marginalised groups and other audiences and the importance of developing astrategy that goes beyond online communities.He will look at the importance of texting, sharing photos, and increasingly, tweeting, using Facebook and Google Plus to compliment online communities.In this environment then what are the skills necessary to be successful.Probably the most important roles may well be those of information aggregators, online-offline organisers, social reporters etc doing a mix of making sense, joiningup, helping others to engage, and working across networks rather than just on individual platforms.How do we develop this new network infrastructure, what mapping is necessary and how do we find and enable the facilitators and orchestrators of thisenvironment so that it can be successful?David Wilcoxhttp://socialreporter.comhttp://socialreporters.netdavid@socialreporter.com@davidwilcoxFree book download on social tech for social impact http://socialbysocial.comDrew Mackiedrewmackie@mac.com
  2. 2. We won’t do it by • Building (yet another) civil society online platform • Expecting volunteer local bloggers to do it all • Just favouring Facebook, or Google+, or Twitter, or Linkedin • Polarising online and face-to-face We may do better by • Thinking about network structures • Developing networky attitudes and behaviours • Understanding roles of people • Making organisations more sociable • Blending media and using what suits us Becoming network builders .... not just networkersTuesday, 28 February 12Much of the discussion about the use of online networking for civil society has been around what technology to use, with some polarised attitudes on* the need for a one-stop online platform - for example http://yoursquaremile.co.uk/ supported by Big Lottery Fund* the value of local blogs and online communities - see http://talkaboutlocal.org.uk/ and http://networkedneighbourhoods.com/* the scope for using systems like Facebook and Twitter - because that’s where people areIn addition, there has in the past been a split between those favouring online networking, and those who believe nothing substitutes for face-to-face. There is nowmore cross-over.This presentation suggests we need a framework that involve undertanding structures, individual attitudes and behaviours, and roles: we need a mix of media,and for existing organisations to behave in ways that make it easier to network.
  3. 3. National - local challenge Newsnet Your Square Mile NatCan Our Society ABCD Fiery Spirits Transition Towns ... and Facebook, Linkedin Twitter, Google+, blogs These don’t join upTuesday, 28 February 12This diagram suggests that local level, people seeking to build networks, and connect within communities, will map existing physical and social assets in order toidentify resources,encourage local action, and act as reporters to tell stories about what is happening.We need the eqivalent at the national level - and some joining up between local and national.There are some online spaces and networks operating nationally in the field of local action - for example:http://nationalcan.ning.com/http://oursociety.org.uk/http://newsnet.mediatrust.org/http://yoursquaremile.co.uk/http://fieryspirits.com/http://abcdeurope.ning.com/http://www.transitionnetwork.org/However, while people may be members of several networks, there is little linkage. There is also a lot of activity on Twitter, blogs and other networks, but it can bedifficult to make sense of the many conversations and references.
  4. 4. Still many hierarchies loosely joined Developing a social innovation network How can we help local groups, civil society organisations, agencies, share ideas and experience of doing "good stuff" locally and nationally. Move from models 1. and 2. to model 3 2. Cluster: Join in (if you can) 1. Portal: "join us" nodes for ideas and support; people, events, hubs ideas via stories and conversations 3. Mesh: join up your own connectionsTuesday, 28 February 12While there may be more talk about networking, many organisations still operate as hierarchies, or in clusters of hierarchies. To achieve the soirt of civil societynetworking we are exploring here, we need more of a mesh.
  5. 5. If we want more connection and collaboration we need • Networky attitudes • Networky roles • More sociable organisations • A personal approachTuesday, 28 February 12While technology is an important enabler, for it to work we need attitudes and roles disposed to networking, more open organisations, and to work out a personalstyle that support networking.
  6. 6. Collaborative attitudes and behaviours Collaboration pyramid Oscar Berg http://www.thecontenteconomy.com/2012/02/collaboration-pyramid.html Collaboration depends on connecting, conversing, sharing, being visible, discovering, building trustTuesday, 28 February 12Oscar Berg writes about The collaboration pyramid (or iceberg) http://www.thecontenteconomy.com/2012/02/collaboration-pyramid.htmlWhile he is writing about enterprises, the same principles apply more widely:The majority of the value-creation activities in an enterprise are hidden. They happen below the surface. What we see when we think of collaboration in thetraditional sense (structured team-based collaboration) is the tip of the iceberg – teams who are coordinating their actions to achieve some goal. We don’t see -and thus don’t recognize - all the activities which have enabled the team to form and which help them throughout their journey. We see the people in the team,how they coordinate their actions and the results of their actions, but we rarely see the other things which have been critical for their success. For example, wedon’t see how they have used their personal networks to access knowledge, information and skills which they don’t have in their team already but which areinstrumental for their success.The layers which are below the surface are usually not recognized or valued. Below the surface you typically find: • The direct and indirect contributions from people outside the team – by the extended team, stakeholders and external contributors • Other kinds of broader and ad hoc collaboration (social collaboration) than those that fit within the traditional definition of (structured, team-based) collaboration • The ongoing community building that makes people trust each other and commit themselves to a shared purpose • The efforts of gaining the workspace awareness that is necessary for making the right decisions in any collaborative effortBring those above the surface so they can be recognized and supported. If people cant do those things, even the traditional collaboration efforts will suffer ormight not even happen. If we are to improve efficiency and effectiveness of collaborative efforts, we need to better support these layers.The first step towards improving these layers of collaboration and support other kinds of collaboration is to recognize their existence and value.
  7. 7. somehow pointless - a bit like tryingmeasures may art orabstruse and complicated but are the to analyse seem love. meat of the analysts work. An analyst may not be a good Understanding of network roles networker or capable of building a network but they do Ne Network Analyst know how networks work.plies to many Analysts do know about the mechanics of networks. They An works are the Network Builder are familiar with concepts of centrality and use specialisedare Network Builders are out there in the real world interactingk culture to be with other people who are members to various and analyse them. These diagrams and sof software of draw networks.arily know much They will be good networkers themselves and probably measures may seem abstruse and complicated but are the s the right prism have a working knowledge of centrality but their central me meat of the analysts work. An analyst may not be a good and skill is being able to connect other people. 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  8. 8. More sociable organisations Curate content Resources Events Commission Host Convene and catalyse Capture stories and Build knowledge networks Visit Explorations Moving from central to social - and a knowledge ecologyTuesday, 28 February 12I developed this diagram for a conversation with staff at Big Lottery Fund, where John Popham and I did some work in 2011 exploring how BIG could be more thana funder. The blog entries are here http://www.socialreporters.net/?p=256I suggested the BIG might aim to do more in catalysing and convening.Events could be reported in ways that help build networks, with content curated to provide more resources.Visits to groups and other activities could be used to develop stories about local action, and build networks
  9. 9. Finding a personal approach to networking Mine is social reporting Commend Listen out Connect Spot opportunities Capture Join up Interpret Make sense Introduce Bridge Socialreporter Aggregate Encourage Help out Scrutinise Mentor (if no-one else will) Support SignpostTuesday, 28 February 12I’m developing the role of social reporter, as someone who aims to help people make sense of the masses of content in different places; who connect people andconversations; and who helps people use social media for themselves. There is also a role to scrutinise and challenge.
  10. 10. A few questions • What works for activists (and you)? • Should we focus more on mobile? • Why don’t online systems join up? • Are civil society organisations networkable? http://socialreporter.com http://socialreporters.net david@socialreporter.com @davidwilcoxTuesday, 28 February 12

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