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High Impact Instructional Moves <br />Week 2<br />
Indicator	Instruction-4<br />I-4: Uses questioning effectively <br />
Observable effective teacher evidence<br />Teacher uses effective questioning by asking students to explain their thinking...
Observable distinguished teacher evidence (additional)<br />Teacher(s) structures allow all students to consider questions...
Effective examples would include questioning that: <br />Asks students for reasoning behind their answers, regardless of i...
Readings and Reasearch<br />Check out these readings from Doug Lemov’s book Teach like a Champion. They can be found in th...
Effective student behaviors:<br />Students demonstrate critical thinking processes when responding to questions. <br />Stu...
Higher level questioning<br />What does higher level questioning force your students to do? <br />Why is it a reasonable c...
Join the discussion<br />Did you see use of the questioning techniques studied this week in the video? <br />No opt out, w...
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High impact week 2

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High Impact Instructional Moves Week 2

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High impact week 2

  1. 1. High Impact Instructional Moves <br />Week 2<br />
  2. 2. Indicator Instruction-4<br />I-4: Uses questioning effectively <br />
  3. 3. Observable effective teacher evidence<br />Teacher uses effective questioning by asking students to explain their thinking and engaging them in higher-level, critical thinking that leads to mastery of objective(s). <br />In whole group settings, teacher mostly uses styles of questioning other than whole group to ensure most students‘ participation. <br />Teacher provides sufficient wait time. <br />Questioning for ELLs is appropriate (i.e., pace, structure, wait time). <br />
  4. 4. Observable distinguished teacher evidence (additional)<br />Teacher(s) structures allow all students to consider questions (e.g., Think-Pair-Share, white board responses). <br />Whole group questioning is minimal unless opportunities exist for multiple students to respond. <br />Teacher acts as facilitator, setting up students to answer and question with each other, as well as with teacher. <br />Teacher creates opportunities for students to initiate and create questions for each other and/or teacher. <br />
  5. 5. Effective examples would include questioning that: <br />Asks students for reasoning behind their answers, regardless of if answers are correct and typically before indicating if answers are correct or not. <br />Is designed to support students reaching the intended learning. <br />Focuses students‘ attention on discipline‘s big ideas and/or make connections between big ideas. <br />Uses feedback loops to get additional information from students (i.e., questionanswerclarifyingquestionanswerprobingquestionanswer). <br />Requires students to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize what they know and learn. <br />Waits 3–5 seconds after posing questions. <br />Scaffolds questions through simplified sentence structures, slower pacing, and additional wait time according to ELLs‘ English language levels, as well as according to students‘ entry to tasks. <br />Moves students toward self-discovery using inquiry-based process.<br />
  6. 6. Readings and Reasearch<br />Check out these readings from Doug Lemov’s book Teach like a Champion. They can be found in the readings tab to your left.<br />Stretch it<br />No opt out<br />Wait time<br />Each chapter addresses ways to make sure you guide and assist your students through the learning process. <br />
  7. 7. Effective student behaviors:<br />Students demonstrate critical thinking processes when responding to questions. <br />Students also initiate and/or create questions for teacher and each other. <br />Students engage in dialogue with one another to answer questions. <br />
  8. 8. Higher level questioning<br />What does higher level questioning force your students to do? <br />Why is it a reasonable check for understanding? <br />Can you come up with a list of questions related to one lesson? <br />Why does waiting for a few seconds help?<br />Was this questioning effective? How would you make it better? <br />How will you use these techniques in your classroom?<br />How can you get your students to ask probing questions and increase peer dialogue?<br />***please free to make some notes<br />(Insert video view here on questioning)<br />
  9. 9. Join the discussion<br />Did you see use of the questioning techniques studied this week in the video? <br />No opt out, wait time, stretch it, and higher level questioning? <br />Was this questioning effective? How would you make it better? <br />How will you use these techniques in your classroom?<br />

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