Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Energy Poverty and Some of Its Impacts

122 views

Published on

The former executive vice president of both Global Exploration for Royal Dutch Shell and Exploration and Commercial for Shell Upstream Americas, Dr. David Lawrence retired from Shell in 2013. He is currently Chairman of Lawrence Energy Group LLC, a Director of Stone Energy, and Chairman of the Yale Climate and Energy Institute Advisory Board, David Lawrence maintains Energy Perspectives, a blog at www.lawrence1energy.blogspot.com, where he discusses solutions for energy poverty and is a contributor to the Energy Collective.

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Energy Poverty and Some of Its Impacts

  1. 1. Energy Poverty and Some of Its Impacts David Lawrence, Shell
  2. 2. Introduction • The former executive vice president of both Global Exploration for Royal Dutch Shell and Exploration and Commercial for Shell Upstream Americas, Dr. David Lawrence retired from Shell in 2013. He is currently Chairman of Lawrence Energy Group LLC, a Director of Stone Energy, and Chairman of the Yale Climate and Energy Institute Advisory Board, David Lawrence maintains Energy Perspectives, a blog at www.lawrence1energy.blogspot.com, where he discusses solutions for energy poverty and is a contributor to the Energy Collective. Energy is a necessity of modern life. Access to electricity makes health care possible, including by powering hospital lights and heat and the refrigeration of vaccines.
  3. 3. Energy Poverty • It allows businesses to function and students to receive an education. Access to electricity also makes it possible to cook foods without polluting indoor air. Up to 1.2 billion people, which amounts to about 17 percent of the world’s population, have no access to electricity. An even larger proportion of the global population, 38 percent, has no access to clean cooking facilities, but instead uses wood or biomass to cook indoors. Consequently, 3.5 million people, mostly women and children, die of cooking-related respiratory illnesses annually. Hence, by addressing energy poverty, literally millions of lives could be saved.

×