Dewr 6760 Aust Jobs2011 7.0 Fixed After Proof.Indd

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Australia Job Summary from the Government 2011

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Dewr 6760 Aust Jobs2011 7.0 Fixed After Proof.Indd

  1. 1. 2011AUSTRALIAN JOBS
  2. 2. Contents National, state and territory labour markets HOW CAN I USE Labour market overview 4 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011? National overview 5 New South Wales 6 Australian Jobs 2011 presents information for people exploring careers or Victoria 7 education and training options, as well as those currently looking for work Queensland 8 or wanting assistance to enter or re-enter the labour market. The publication South Australia 9 includes information about employment trends by region, occupation and Western Australia 10 industry, together with projected employment growth and job prospects. Tasmania 11 The 2011 edition focuses on the variations in labour markets across regions Northern Territory 12 of Australia. Regional labour markets vary markedly in terms of their industry Australian Capital Territory 12 composition, age and educational profiles. It is useful to know which are the Industries key industries in your region and to understand the profile of the workforce, as this information gives you an insight into where the jobs are, how strong Industry overview 13 replacement demand will be, whether new jobs are being created and Australia’s changing industry structure 14 Accommodation and Food Services 14 whether jobs are likely to require high levels of skill or qualification. Administrative and Support Services 15 Although the requirements for specific skills vary across regions and Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 15 industries, overall, the demand for skilled workers is growing strongly Arts and Recreation Services 16 as the Australian economy continues to strengthen. Construction 16 It is also true that no matter in which region or industry you work, Education and Training 17 employers place very strong value on employability skills, that is, those Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 17 non-technical skills required to work effectively (information is on page 30). Financial and Insurance Services 18 When you are competing with many people for positions, it can be difficult Health Care and Social Assistance 18 to make yourself stand out from the crowd. Australian Jobs provides an Information Media and Telecommunications 19 insight into the value of post-school education and training, as well as Manufacturing 19 providing information about employability skills, to help you get the job you Mining 20 want, develop your career and support you to make informed choices. Other Services 20 Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 21 The publication also highlights Government services available to assist you Public Administration and Safety 21 if you are looking for a job or want support for training or need help after Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 22 you have found a job (pages 32 to 34). Retail Trade 22 While education and training is vital, one of the most difficult challenges, that Transport, Postal and Warehousing 23 even the most highly educated person can face, is breaking into the labour Wholesale Trade 23 market with little or no workplace experience. It’s important to keep in mind Occupations and skills that an entry level job can provide you with the workplace skills and experience that will be the vital first stepping stone to success in the labour market. Occupational overview 24 Occupational clusters and skill level 25 Although information contained in Australian Jobs 2011 is as up-to-date as Industry and occupational projections 26 we can make it, the labour market can change quickly and the skills needed Who is in-training? 27 by employers vary across industries and geographic locations. Consequently, Education and employment 28 employment and training decisions need to be based on a range of Employability skills 30 information including expectations about pay, working conditions, skills and Skills for sustainability 31 interests as well as training requirements and long term goals. Consider Employment, education and training services 32 information from a wide range of sources. Useful sites include Regional assistance 33 www.deewr.gov.au – education, training, employment and Job Prospects Matrix workplace information Guide to the Job Prospects Matrix 35 www.jobguide.deewr.gov.au – careers options and job requirements Job Prospects Matrix 36 www.joboutlook.gov.au – occupational information Australian Jobs 2011 data sources 43 www.jobsearch.gov.au – current employment vacancies www.myfuture.edu.au – get the facts and personalise your Inquiries about Australian Jobs should be directed to careers exploration. AustralianJobs@deewr.gov.au The content of Australian Jobs 2011 is based on information available at the time of publication. Over time, the reliability of the data and analysis may diminish. The Commonwealth, its officers, employees and agents do not accept responsibility for any inaccuracies contained in the report or for any negligence in the compilation of the report and disclaim liability for any loss suffered for any person arising from the use of this report. Labour market information must be used cautiously as employment prospects can change over time and vary by region. It is important in making and assessing career choices to consider all factors, including interests and aptitudes, remuneration and expectations, and the requirements of occupations.2 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011
  3. 3. Minister’s forewordAustralia has a strong labour market, and our continued low unemployment confirms the underlying strength of the Australianeconomy. It is clear, though, that the natural disasters over early 2011 have taken a significant toll on the people and the economyin Queensland, and we now have an unprecedented rebuilding task.Many more skilled workers will be needed, not only to meet the challenges of this task, but also to meet employer needsnationally as the economy continues to grow. The Australian Government is continuing to invest in skills, training and education.This focus is important to ensure that employers have the skilled labour they need and to enable all Australians, no matter wherethey live, to share in the enormous benefits and opportunities provided by a strong economy.Developing a highly skilled and educated workforce is at the very heart of the Gillard Government’s plan to build an economy thatwill meet the challenges of the future.To meet the strong skills demand, the Gillard Government has made record investments in education and training. Our landmarkreforms have opened the doors of Australian universities to a new generation of students. In 2011 there are an extra 50 000undergraduate students enrolled at Australian universities compared with 2009.There are also now a record 448 800 apprentices and trainees in-training across the nation.At every age and at every stage in life, Australians must have access to education and training to gain the skills they need to takethe high-paid, high-skilled jobs on offer in our economy.The Australian Jobs 2011 publication supports this aim by providing a wealth of information about the labour market and aboutAustralian Government services which can assist you if you need help to develop your skills or find employment. It highlights theindustries in which employment is expected to grow most strongly over the next five years and provides an insight into regionallabour markets and the opportunities they provide.I recommend this valuable resource to anyone interested in education, training and work.Chris Evans AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011 3
  4. 4. National, state and territory labour markets LABOUR MARKET OVERVIEW The changing labour market Unemployment Rate and Annual Employment Growth, March 1991 to March 2011 (%) Over the last 20 years, the nature of the Australian labour market has changed considerably. Today’s workforce is different from the one that Unemployment Rate (%) Annual Employment Growth (%) existed several decades ago. Over this period, we have seen 12.0 6.0 • the ageing of the population 5.0 10.0 • a considerable increase in the participation of women in the workforce 4.0 • a much greater focus on skilled jobs and slower growth in lower skilled jobs Annual Employment Growth (%) 3.0 Unemployment Rate (%) 8.0 • a greater number of young people choosing to participate in education 2.0 • technological change, greater labour market flexibility and economic 6.0 1.0 reforms which have helped to transform peoples’ working arrangements. 0.0 4.0 Following the end of the early 1990s recession up until the onset of the -1.0 global recession in September 2008, the demand for workers in Australia -2.0 was high. 2.0 -3.0 • Indeed, over the 15 years to September 2008, employment growth 0.0 -4.0 was exceptionally strong, increasing by around 3.2 million (or an Mar-91 Mar-92 Mar-93 Mar-94 Mar-95 Mar-96 Mar-97 Mar-98 Mar-99 Mar-00 Mar-01 Mar-02 Mar-03 Mar-04 Mar-05 Mar-06 Mar-07 Mar-08 Mar-09 Mar-10 Mar-11 annual average rate of 2.3%). • Full-time employment rose by 1.9 million over the period (an annual Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, trend data average rate of 1.9%), while part-time employment increased by almost 1.3 million (or an annual average rate of 3.6%), although the Interesting facts about regional rise in part-time employment was clearly off a much lower base. labour markets The global recession and the There are more than 4.1 million jobs in regional Australia. Five industries employ more than 300 000 workers in regional Australia. These industries labour market are Retail Trade (463 400 workers), Health Care and Social Assistance Following the onset of the global recession the Australian labour market (461 500), Construction (395 800), Manufacturing (347 400) and slowed significantly. Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (331 500). • Employment increased by just 0.4% between September 2008 and Those job seekers who are mobile, or who are prepared to up-skill or September 2009, compared with an annual average growth rate of retrain, particularly in occupations where there are shortages, will have 2.8% over the five years to September 2008. a great advantage in the labour market. • The unemployment rate increased, from 4.3% in September 2008 to • The Government offers a broad range of assistance to help job seekers a peak of 5.8% in September 2009. to train (see pages 32 to 34). • Unemployment rose significantly over the year to September 2009 (up • There are also incentives available for eligible job seekers who are by 182 900 or 37.6%). However, this would have been much larger had considering relocating for work or an apprenticeship (see page 33). employers not chosen, at least in the first instance, to reduce employee hours in an attempt to avoid redundancies. Keeping in touch with local labour market conditions and what skills are in • Reflecting this, over the year to September 2009, the level of part-time demand is also important. employment increased by 182 400 (or 5.9%) while full-time • If you are considering moving to find work, or just want to research your employment declined by 136 400 (or 1.7%). local labour market, you can explore facts and figures about your region • A number of other factors also helped restrict the rise in unemployment through the Labour Market Information Portal (www.deewr.gov.au/lmip). in Australia during the global recession, including significant investments • Other resources such as www.deewr.gov.au/skillshortages will let in public infrastructure and resilient demand for our mining exports. you know what skilled occupations are currently in shortage. • Information on outcomes for university and vocational education and Recovery from the global recession training graduates can also be a valuable resource for informing your career choices (see pages 28 and 29). Labour market conditions have strengthened considerably since the height of the global recession and have been particularly robust over the past year. Jobs Services Australia providers are located in more than 2100 towns, • Employment increased solidly, by 309 500 (or 2.8%) between March cities and rural sites across Australia. Job Services Australia provides 2010 and March 2011, with more than 90% of total employment opportunities for training, skills development, work experience and tailored growth accounted for by full-time employment. assistance. See page 32 for more information. • The unemployment rate fell from 5.3% to 4.9%. • The participation rate (the proportion of adults in Australia who are either employed or are looking for work) increased by 0.5 percentage points over the year to stand at a near record high of 65.8% in March 2011.4 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011
  5. 5. National, state and territory labour marketsNATIONAL OVERVIEWAustralia’s labour market the employment growth rate was strongest in the Northern Territory, the small size of its labour force means there was a relatively small numberKey labour market statistics of new jobs, 23 700 (or 2% of new jobs nationally) .Employment (number) 11 390 100Employment change (past 5 years) % 13.1 Australia has an ageing workforce, with almost two out of every fiveWorking part-time % 30 workers (38%) aged 45 years or older, up from 33% a decade ago. OverFemale % 45 the same period, the proportion of employed persons aged under 25 hasAged 45 years or older % 38 fallen slightly from 18% to 17%.Employment outside state capital cities % 37Education Capital cities and regional areasWithout post-school qualifications % 39 There are sound opportunities for employment in regional Australia. InWith VET qualifications (Cert III or higher) % 30 November 2010, there were more than 4.1 million people employed inWith a Bachelor degree or higher % 26 regional Australia, more than one in three workers (37%). The labour market varies markedly across regions with a number of areasAustralia’s population is around 22.3 million and almost 11.4 million Australians experiencing strong employment growth and low unemployment rates.are employed. The workforce is highly concentrated, with more than three in Even in those regions where unemployment is relatively high, some employersevery four workers employed in the three most populous states. New South experience difficulty recruiting, particularly in skilled occupations. This isWales is the largest employing state with around 3.6 million workers, followed largely due to a mismatch between the ‘pool of skills’ and those needed byby Victoria, almost 2.9 million, and Queensland, 2.3 million. The smallest state, local employers. For example, many people looking for work may have limitedTasmania, employs 237 400 workers, although the Australian Capital Territory qualifications, but employers need highly skilled people.and the Northern Territory have smaller workforces. Workers in regional areas are less likely to have studied after they haveDespite the impact of the global recession, particularly from late 2008 to left school indicating there are real advantages for workers in these areaslate 2009, every state and territory recorded an increase in employment to gain post-school qualifications to meet the skill needs of local employers.over the five years to November 2010. The strongest growth was recorded It is also interesting to note, that employment growth in New South Walesin the Northern Territory, Western Australia and Queensland, which all has been stronger in regional areas over the past five years than it has beenrecorded growth in excess of 15% (compared with 13.1% nationally), due in Sydney highlighting the demand for workers in these locations.in large part to high levels of activity in the resources sector. The table below shows that, generally speaking, the workforce tends to beHowever, the largest numbers of new jobs created over the five years were older in regional areas than in metropolitan areas. This suggests there willin the three largest states of Victoria (up by 362 400 or 14.5%), New South be strong demand for workers in these areas to replace those who retireWales (348 900 or 10.7%) and Queensland (309 900 or 15.3%). Although over the next decade.Employment by state, city and region % of employed Employ’t Employ’t Aged Aged 45 persons (aged Employ’t change change younger years or 15-64) without Nov 2010 1 year to 5 years to than 25 older post-school Nov 2010 Nov 2010 years qualifications1 ‘000 ‘000 % ‘000 % % %New South Wales 3595.5 127.6 3.7 348.9 10.7 16 38 36Sydney 2299.1 37.2 1.6 167.0 7.8 16 36 36Regional NSW 1224.1 34.2 2.9 137.4 12.6 16 43 43Victoria 2856.8 95.4 3.5 362.4 14.5 17 38 38Melbourne 2102.9 80.1 4.0 245.4 13.2 17 36 39Regional VIC 707.4 21.4 3.1 85.3 13.7 16 44 46Queensland 2330.6 74.4 3.3 309.9 15.3 18 38 42Brisbane 1061.8 21.5 2.1 114.7 12.1 19 35 43Regional QLD 1240.9 28.2 2.3 192.6 18.4 18 40 49South Australia 815.6 13.2 1.6 67.8 9.1 17 41 42Adelaide 600.1 19.4 3.3 53.5 9.8 18 40 44Regional SA 209.4 -6.0 -2.8 13.0 6.6 15 45 52Western Australia 1225.9 45.0 3.8 166.0 15.7 18 38 42Perth 907.7 24.1 2.7 138.2 18.0 19 38 42Regional WA 302.2 5.5 1.9 35.9 13.5 15 41 50Tasmania 237.4 4.9 2.1 14.4 6.5 17 43 44Hobart 102.0 0.6 0.6 -6.2 -5.7 17 41 43Regional Tasmania 134.2 0.5 0.3 23.5 21.2 16 44 49Northern Territory 122.9 2.1 1.8 23.7 23.9 17 36 42Australian Capital Territory 205.1 6.5 3.3 20.3 11.0 18 36 33Australia 11 390.1 369.0 3.3 1316.8 13.1 17 38 391 Data for the states and Australia are from the ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2010. Data for state capital cites and regional areas are from the 2006 Census (latest available data). AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011 5
  6. 6. National, state and territory labour markets NEW SOUTH WALES New South Wales is the largest employing state, with almost one in every three Regional New South Wales Australian workers (3.6 million). Employment is concentrated in Sydney which accounts for almost two-thirds of the state’s employment. The largest In regional New South Wales, around 60% of those employed work in three employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance (404 900), of the nine regions, Newcastle; Northern, North Western and Central West; Retail Trade (364 900) and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services and Richmond-Tweed and Mid-North Coast. (304 300), which collectively account for about 30% of the state’s employment. Over the year to November 2010, employment grew more strongly in regional Employment grew by 348 900 or 10.7% over the five years to November New South Wales than it did in Sydney (2.9% compared with 1.6%). The 2010, compared with national growth of 13.1%. Employment rose in 16 of strongest growth was in Newcastle, up by 8.8% or 21 500, and Illawarra, up by the 19 industries, with the largest numbers of new jobs being in Health Care 6.7% or 3900. On the other hand, employment in Far West NSW fell by 22.0%. and Social Assistance (92 500), Professional, Scientific and Technical The largest employing industries in regional New South Wales are Health Care Services (54 800) and Education and Training (39 500). Over the past year, and Social Assistance (150 000), Retail Trade (136 200) and Construction employment has increased by 3.7% compared with national growth of 3.3%. (104 800). Over the year to November 2010, the largest numbers of new jobs The New South Wales workforce is relatively highly skilled with 64% of were in Education and Training (12 300), Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing workers holding a post-school qualification compared with 61% nationally. It (11 200) and Health Care and Social Assistance (11 100). also has a higher proportion of workers who hold a Bachelor degree or higher The proportion of workers who do not hold post-school qualifications is qualification than the national average (29% compared with 26%). higher in regional areas than it is in Sydney (43% compared with 36%). More than 70% of New South Wales workers are employed full-time, and Regional areas also have a lower proportion of people participating in the 45% of workers are female. The proportion of workers aged 45 years or older workforce (60% compared with 66% in Sydney). is the same as the national average (38%). Employment by Region, Nov 2010 (% of total) Employment Growth, Year to Nov 2010 (%) Population and Employment Population Employment 1 year 1 year Aged Certificate Aged 45 Bachelor June change change younger III/IV No post- Nov 2010 % of years degree or 2009 to June to Nov than 25 or higher school qual (‘000) 2 total2 or older higher qual (‘000)1 2009 2010 years VET qual (%) 3 (%) 2 (%) 3 (%)1 (%) 2 (%) 2 (%) 3 Sydney 4504.5 1.9 2299.1 65.3 1.6 16 36 29 26 36 Richmond-Tweed 551.5 1.4 223.3 6.3 2.6 13 47 15 31 43 and Mid-North Coast Murray-Murrumbidgee 277.1 1.1 135.9 3.9 0.7 17 47 14 29 47 Newcastle 540.8 1.4 266.1 7.6 8.8 19 38 17 33 41 Hunter 103.5 1.3 51.2 1.5 0.9 17 49 11 34 45 Wollongong 289.0 1.2 124.6 3.5 -0.1 19 36 19 33 38 Illawarra 142.2 1.6 62.8 1.8 6.7 20 46 16 34 40 South Eastern 216.6 1.6 106.8 3.0 -5.3 13 47 17 30 43 Northern, North Western 486.5 1.2 244.4 6.9 4.5 16 43 14 29 46 and Central West Far West 22.7 -0.5 9.1 0.3 -22.0 11 57 12 27 51 New South Wales 7134.4 1.7 3595.5 100.0 3.7 16 38 294 294 36 4 Sources: 1ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009; 2ABS Labour Force Survey; 3ABS 2006 Census; 4ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2010 (data available at national and state levels only).6 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011
  7. 7. National, state and territory labour marketsVICTORIAVictoria is the second largest employing state, with one-quarter of the Regional Victorianation’s employment (almost 2.9 million). Employment is highly The largest employing areas in regional Victoria are Barwon-Western Districtconcentrated in Melbourne which accounts for three-quarters of the state’s (195 100) and Goulburn-Ovens-Murray (143 300). Over the year to Novemberworkforce. The largest employing industries are Retail Trade (317 300), 2010, growth was strongest in All Gippsland, up by 10.9% or 13 300, andHealth Care and Social Assistance (313 100) and Manufacturing (305 800), Goulburn-Ovens-Murray, up by 5.9% or 8000. Central Highlands-Wimmerawhich together account for about one in every three workers. recorded the only fall in employment (down by 3.3%).State employment grew by 362 400 or 14.5% over the five years to November The largest employing industries in regional Victoria are Health Care and Social2010, stronger than the national growth rate of 13.1%. Employment rose in 17 Assistance (84 500), Retail Trade (80 900) and Manufacturing (80 300). A largeof the 19 industries, with the largest numbers of new jobs created in Health number of jobs were created in regional Victoria over the year to November 2010,Care and Social Assistance (55 800), Construction (51 000) and Education particularly in Construction (10 700) and Other Services ( 6100).and Training (45 900). The largest fall in employment was in Manufacturing(down by 18 700 or 5.8%). Over the past year, employment in Victoria Workers in regions outside Melbourne are less likely to hold post-schoolincreased by 3.5% compared with national growth of 3.3%. qualifications than their city counterparts (54% hold post-school qualifications compared with 61% in Melbourne). The proportion of workersThe Victorian workforce is relatively highly skilled with 30% of workers holding who hold Certificate III/IV Vocational Education and Training qualificationsa Bachelor degree or higher qualification compared with 26% nationally. varies little across metropolitan and regional areas. There is a markedAbout 45% of workers are female, and 31% of workers are employed difference though between Melbourne and regional locations in the proportionpart-time compared with 30% for Australia. The proportion of the Victorian of workers who hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (28% inworkforce aged 45 years or older is the same as the national average (38%). Melbourne compared with 15% in regional Victoria). Regional Victoria also has a lower proportion of people participating in the workforce (63% compared with 67% in Melbourne).Employment by Region, Nov 2010 (% of total) Employment Growth, Year to Nov 2010 (%)Population and Employment Population Employment 1 year 1 year Aged Certificate Aged 45 Bachelor June change Nov change younger III/IV or No post- % of years degree or 2009 to June 2010 to Nov than 25 higher school qual total2 or older higher qual (‘000)1 2009 (‘000) 2 2010 years VET qual (%) 3 (%) 2 (%) 3 (%)1 (%) 2 (%) 2 (%) 3Melbourne 3995.5 2.4 2102.9 74.8 4.0 17 36 28 25 39Barwon-Western District 391.4 1.8 195.1 6.9 0.2 15 42 17 30 45Central Highlands-Wimmera 206.5 1.7 100.8 3.6 -3.3 19 38 17 29 46Loddon-Mallee 278.4 1.5 132.7 4.7 2.5 17 46 16 29 47Goulburn-Ovens-Murray 310.0 1.1 143.3 5.1 5.9 17 47 14 30 48All Gippsland 261.5 1.9 135.5 4.8 10.9 16 48 14 32 46Victoria 5443.2 2.1 2856.8 100.0 3.5 17 38 30 4 28 4 38 4 1 2 3 4Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009; ABS Labour Force Survey; ABS 2006 Census; ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2010 (data available at national and state levels only). AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011 7
  8. 8. National, state and territory labour markets QUEENSLAND Queensland is the third largest employing state, with one in every five Regional Queensland Australian workers (2.3 million). Employment is regionally dispersed with 54% of employment outside Brisbane. The figures presented on this page Over the year to November 2010, regional employment growth in do not reflect the effects of the natural disasters which occurred in early Queensland was stronger than metropolitan growth (2.3% compared 2011 but clearly these have had, and will continue to have, a pronounced with 2.1% in Brisbane). impact on the state’s labour market. The largest employing regions outside Brisbane are the Gold Coast, where The largest employing industries are Retail Trade (262 500), Health Care slightly more than one in eight Queensland workers is employed (12.7%) and and Social Assistance (252 200) and Construction (236 100), which Mackay-Fitzroy-Central West which accounts for almost one in ten (9.1%). together account for almost one-third of employment in Queensland. Over the year to November 2010, employment growth was strongest in Employment grew by 309 900 or 15.3% over the five years to November West Moreton, up by 6.6% or 2400, Northern-North West Queensland, up 2010, compared with national growth of 13.1%. The largest numbers of by 5.9% or 8300, and the Sunshine Coast up by 5.0% or 7400. Consistent new jobs were in Health Care and Social Assistance (64 300), Construction with the state as a whole, the largest employing industries in regional (35 000) and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (29 400). The Queensland are Retail Trade (152 000), Health Care and Social Assistance only fall was in Information Media and Telecommunications (down by 4400 (132 900) and Construction (132 300). The largest numbers of new jobs or 12.3%). Over the past year, employment in Queensland rose by 3.3%, over the past year were created in Health Care and Social Assistance the same rate as the national average. (11 600) and Public Administration and Safety (10 500). Queensland has a slightly higher proportion of workers who do not hold The proportion of workers who do not hold post-school qualifications post-school qualifications than the national average (42% compared with is higher in regional areas of Queensland than it is in Brisbane (49% 39%). It also has a lower proportion of workers who hold a Bachelor degree compared with 43%). or higher qualification than the national average (21% compared with 26%), but a slightly higher proportion of workers who hold Certificate III/IV or higher Regional areas also have a lower proportion of people participating Vocational Education and Training qualifications (32% compared with 30%). in the workforce (66% compared with 69% in Brisbane). About 46% of Queensland workers are female compared with 45% nationally and 29% of workers are employed part-time compared with 30% nationally. The workforce has the same proportion of workers aged 45 years or older as the national average (38%). Employment by Region, Nov 2010 (% of total) Employment Growth, Year to Nov 2010 (%) Population and Employment Population Employment 1 year 1 year Aged Certificate Aged 45 Bachelor June change Nov change younger III/IV or No post- % of years degree or 2009 to June 2010 to Nov than 25 higher school qual total2 or older higher qual (‘000)1 2009 (‘000) 2 2010 years VET qual (%) 3 (%) 2 (%) 3 (%)1 (%) 2 (%) 2 (%) 3 Brisbane 1962.4 2.6 1061.8 46.1 2.1 19 35 23 26 43 Sunshine Coast 323.4 3.0 154.4 6.7 5.0 21 41 15 32 44 West Moreton 80.2 4.3 38.2 1.7 6.6 15 45 9 27 56 Wide Bay-Burnett 293.5 3.1 123.8 5.4 0.8 17 47 11 29 51 Mackay-Fitzroy-Central West 398.4 2.4 208.8 9.1 -0.3 16 35 12 29 51 Darling Downs-South West 264.7 1.9 138.2 6.0 -0.4 16 45 14 26 52 Northern-North West 261.3 2.2 149.3 6.5 5.9 20 36 15 28 50 Far North 269.7 2.6 135.1 5.9 2.7 19 35 14 30 47 Gold Coast 571.4 3.2 293.1 12.7 2.4 16 39 15 30 46 Queensland 4425.1 2.7 2330.6 100.0 3.3 18 38 214 324 424 Sources: 1ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009; 2ABS Labour Force Survey; 3ABS 2006 Census; 4ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2010 (data available at national and state levels only).8 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011
  9. 9. National, state and territory labour marketsSOUTH AUSTRALIASouth Australia is the second smallest employing state, with 7% of the Regional South Australianation’s employment (815 600). Employment is highly concentrated in Regional South Australia has two labour force regions and they differAdelaide which employs almost three in every four of the state’s workers. markedly in terms of both geographic area and employment size. SouthernThe largest employing industries in South Australia are Health Care and Social and Eastern SA accounts for almost 17% of state employment and NorthernAssistance (106 100), Retail Trade (91 700) and Manufacturing (80 800). and Western SA, which covers a much larger area, accounts for 9%. OverCombined, these industries employ one in every three workers in the state. the year to November 2010, employment fell by 1.3% in Southern andEmployment across the state rose by 67 800 or 9.1% over the five years to Eastern SA and by 5.5% in Northern and Western SA.November 2010, lower than the national rate of 13.1%. Employment rose in The largest employing industries in regional South Australia are Agriculture,15 of the 19 industries, with the largest numbers of new jobs being in Forestry, and Fishing (31 000), Manufacturing (25 300) and Health CareConstruction (19 300), Health Care and Social Assistance (17 500) and and Social Assistance (24 300). Over the past year, the largest numbersProfessional, Scientific and Technical Services (8200). Over the past year, of new jobs were in Construction (3200) and Manufacturing (1500).employment grew by 1.6% compared with national growth of 3.3%. A smaller proportion of workers in regional South Australia hold post-schoolSouth Australia has a slightly lower proportion of workers who hold qualifications than their city counterparts (48% compared with 56%). Thepost-school qualifications than the national average (58% compared proportion of workers who hold Certificate III/IV Vocational Education andwith 61%), and a lower proportion holding a Bachelor degree or higher Training qualifications varies little across metropolitan and regional areas.qualification (23% compared with the national average of 26%). There is a marked difference though between Adelaide and regionalSouth Australia’s workforce has a relatively old age profile, with 41% of locations in the proportion of workers who hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (21% in Adelaide compared with 11% in regionalworkers aged 45 years or older compared with 38% nationally. It also has South Australia).a slightly higher proportion of its workers employed part-time than thenational average (32% compared with 30%) and slightly more of its The proportion of people participating in the workforce is slightly lowerworkers are female (46% compared with 45%). in regional areas than in Adelaide (62% compared with 64%).Employment by Region, Nov 2010 (% of total) Employment Growth, Year to Nov 2010 (%)Population and Employment Population Employment 1 year 1 year Aged Certificate Aged 45 Bachelor June change Nov change younger III/IV No post- % of years or degree or 2009 to June 2010 to Nov than 25 or higher school qual total2 older higher qual (‘000)1 2009 (‘000) 2 2010 years VET qual (%) 3 (%) 2 (%) 3 (%)1 (%) 2 (%) 2 (%) 3Adelaide 1187.5 1.3 600.1 74.1 3.3 18 40 21 27 44Southern and Eastern SA 273.0 1.2 136.9 16.9 -1.3 15 44 11 28 52Northern and Western SA 163.1 0.9 72.5 9.0 -5.5 14 46 11 27 53South Australia 1623.6 1.2 815.6 100.0 1.6 17 41 234 304 424Sources: 1ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009; 2ABS Labour Force Survey; 3ABS 2006 Census; 4ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2010 (data available at national and state levels only). AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011 9
  10. 10. National, state and territory labour markets WESTERN AUSTRALIA Western Australia is the fourth largest employing state, with around one in Regional Western Australia ten Australian workers (1.2 million). Employment is highly concentrated in In regional Western Australia, employment is spread fairly evenly across Perth which accounts for three-quarters of the state’s employment. the two regions, Lower Western WA and Remainder-Balance WA. About The largest employing industries in Western Australia are Construction 32 000 of Western Australia’s 82 400 Mining jobs are located in regional (128 800), Retail Trade (120 700) and Health Care and Social Assistance areas. In addition to local employment, the labour market in regional (117 800). Together, these industries account for around 30% of state jobs. Western Australia is supplemented by workers employed in the Mining industry on a fly-in fly-out basis. Employment grew by 15.7% (166 000) over the five years to November 2010, outstripping the national growth rate of 13.1%. Employment rose Over the year to November 2010, most new jobs were created in Remainder- in 15 of the 19 industries. The largest numbers of new jobs were created Balance WA, up by 12 800 or 9.9%. This was due mainly to mining projects in Mining (34 700), Construction (30 700) and Professional, Scientific and in the region which accounted for almost one-third of all new jobs. Technical Services (21 300). Over the past year, employment has increased Employment in regional Western Australia is driven mainly by Construction by 3.8% compared with national growth of 3.3%. (36 000), Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (33 900) and Mining (31 800), Western Australia has a lower proportion of workers who hold a Bachelor with some construction activity taking place in the mining sector. The largest numbers of new jobs over the past year were in Mining (7500) degree or higher qualification than the national average (23% compared and Other Services (5700). with 26%), although it has a higher proportion of workers who hold Certificate III/IV Vocational Education and Training qualifications or higher The proportion of workers who do not hold post-school qualifications is higher (32% compared with 30%). in regional areas of Western Australia than it is in Perth (50% compared with 42%). The proportion of workers who hold Vocational Education and Training Western Australia has a slightly higher proportion of its workers employed qualifications varies little across metropolitan and regional areas. There is a full-time than the national average (71% compared with 70%). About 38% marked difference though between Perth and regional locations in the of workers are aged 45 years or older, the same as the national average, proportion of workers who hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification and 43% of workers are female (compared with 45% nationally). (22% in Perth compared with 12% in regional Western Australia). The regional areas also have a lower proportion of people participating in the workforce (67% compared with 69% in Perth). Employment by Region, Nov 2010 (% of total) Employment Growth, Year to Nov 2010 (%) Population and Employment Population Employment 1 year 1 year Aged Certificate Aged 45 Bachelor June change Nov change younger III/IV No post- % of years or degree or 2009 to June 2010 to Nov than 25 or higher school qual total2 older higher qual (‘000)1 2009 (‘000) 2 2010 years VET qual (%) 3 (%) 2 (%) 3 (%)1 (%) 2 (%) 2 (%) 3 Perth 1659.0 3.2 907.7 75.0 2.7 19 38 22 28 42 Lower Western WA 324.2 3.5 160.0 13.2 -4.4 17 42 12 29 49 Remainder - Balance WA 261.8 1.9 142.2 11.8 9.9 13 40 12 29 50 Western Australia 2245.1 3.0 1225.9 100.0 3.8 18 38 234 324 424 Sources: 1ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009; 2ABS Labour Force Survey; 3ABS 2006 Census; 4ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2010 (data available at national and state levels only).10 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011
  11. 11. National, state and territory labour marketsTASMANIATasmania is the smallest employing state with 2% of the nation’s Regional Tasmaniaemployment (237 400). Tasmania has the most regionally diverse Regional employment in Tasmania is concentrated in the regions of Mersey-workforce in Australia with around 57% located outside Hobart. Lyell and Northern which account for half the state’s employment. EmploymentThe largest employing industries in Tasmania are Health Care and grew by 2.1% in Tasmania over the year to November 2010 (in trend terms).Social Assistance (29 900), Retail Trade (27 600) and Education Growth was strongest in Mersey-Lyell (1.1% in annual average terms - trendand Training (19 400), which together account for almost one-third data are unavailable for regions). This indicates that employment has grownof the state’s employment. more strongly in Tasmania over recent months. This is reflected by the trendOver the five years to November 2010, Tasmania had relatively low data which places greater emphasis on the most recent months.employment growth, 14 400 or 6.5% compared with national growth of In regional Tasmania, the largest employing industries are Health Care and13.1%. Twelve of the 19 industries increased their employment, with the Social Assistance (16 200), Retail Trade (15 800) and Agriculture, Forestrylargest numbers of new jobs created in Health Care and Social Assistance and Fishing (14 300). The largest numbers of new jobs over the past year(4800), Construction (3500) and Professional, Scientific and Technical were created in Administrative and Support Services (1400) and EducationServices (2900). Over the past year, employment increased by 2.1% and Training (1200).compared with national growth of 3.3%. Workers in regions outside Hobart are less likely to hold post-schoolTasmania has a higher proportion of workers who do not hold post-school qualifications than their city counterparts (51% hold post-schoolqualifications than the national average (44% compared with 39%). A lower qualifications compared with 57% in Hobart). The proportion of workersproportion of workers hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (20% who hold Certificate III/IV Vocational Education and Training qualificationscompared with 26% nationally). varies little across metropolitan and regional areas. There is a markedTasmania has a particularly old age profile, with 43% of workers aged 45 difference though between Hobart and regional locations in the proportionyears or older, the highest of any state or territory. It also has a higher of workers who hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (22% inproportion of its workers employed part-time than the national average Hobart compared with 13% in regional Tasmania).(35% compared with 30%) and more of its workers are female (47% The proportion of people participating in the workforce is evenly spread acrosscompared with 45%). Tasmania with 61% participating in regional Tasmania and 62% in Hobart.Employment by Region, Nov 2010 (% of total) Employment Growth, Year to Nov 2010 (%)Population and Employment Population Employment 1 year Aged Bachelor Certificate 1 year Aged 45 June change Nov younger degree III/IV No post- % of change to years 2009 to June 2010 than 25 or higher or higher school qual total2 Nov 2010 or older (‘000)1 2009 (‘000) 2 years qual VET qual (%) 3 (%) 2 (%) 2 (%)1 (%) 2 (%) 3 (%) 3Hobart 212.0 1.2 102.0 43.2 0.6 17 41 22 27 43Southern 37.5 1.5 16.3 6.9 -1.8 8 56 12 28 50Northern 141.4 0.7 68.4 28.9 0.3 17 43 15 28 48Mersey-Lyell 112.4 1.1 49.6 21.0 1.1 18 42 11 30 50Tasmania 503.3 1.1 237.4 100.0 2.1 17 43 204 304 44 4Sources: 1ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009; 2ABS Labour Force Survey; 3ABS 2006 Census; 4ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2010 (data available at national and state levels only). AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011 11
  12. 12. National, state and territory labour markets NORTHERN TERRITORY AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY Population Population June 2009 (‘000)1 225.9 June 2009 (‘000)1 352.2 1 year change to June 2009 (%)1 2.5 1 year change to June 2009 (%)1 1.7 Employment Employment Nov 2010 (‘000) 2 122.9 Nov 2010 (‘000) 2 205.1 1 year change to Nov 2010 (%) 2 1.8 1 year change to Nov 2010 (%) 2 3.3 Aged younger than 25 years (%) 2 17 Aged younger than 25 years (%) 2 18 Aged 45 years or older (%) 2 36 Aged 45 years or older (%) 2 36 Bachelor degree or higher qualification (%) 3 23 Bachelor degree or higher qualification (%) 3 41 Certificate III/IV or higher VET qualification (%) 3 30 Certificate III/IV or higher VET qualification (%) 3 24 No post-school qualification (%) 3 42 No post-school qualification (%) 3 33 Sources: 1ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2009; 2ABS Labour Force Survey; 3ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2010 (data available at national and state levels only). The Northern Territory has Australia’s smallest labour market, accounting The Australian Capital Territory (ACT) accounts for slightly less than 2% for just 1% of the nation’s employment (122 900). However, the proportion of the nation’s employment (205 100). The largest employing industries of people participating in the workforce is higher in the Northern Territory are Public Administration and Safety (62 800), Professional Scientific and than any state and equal to the Australian Capital Territory. Close to Technical Services (20 800) and Health Care and Social Assistance three-quarters of people are in the labour force in the Northern Territory (17 700), which collectively account for almost half of total employment. (73% compared with 66% nationally). Employment in the ACT grew by 20 300 or 11.0% over the five years to Employment grew strongly over the five years to November 2010, November 2010, compared with national growth of 13.1%. Employment increasing by 23 700 or 23.9% compared with national growth of 13.1%. gains were largest in Public Administration and Safety (14 700), Growth has been more subdued over the past year, increasing by 1.8% Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (3500) and Education and compared with national growth of 3.3%. Training (2300). Employment rose in 12 of the 19 industries. Over the past The largest employing industries in the Northern Territory are Public year, employment increased by 3.3%, the same as the national average. Administration and Safety (18 500), Health Care and Social Assistance The workforce is highly skilled with 67% of workers holding a post-school (13 300) and Construction (11 900), which together account for slightly qualification compared with 61% nationally. A high proportion of workers more than one-third of the territory’s employment. Over the last five years, hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (41% compared with the employment gains were recorded in 17 of the 19 industries, with the largest national average of 26%), but a relatively small proportion hold Certificate numbers of new jobs being in Construction (3700), Health Care and Social III/IV Vocational Education and Training qualifications (24% compared with Assistance (3500) and Public Administration and Safety (3000). 30% nationally). This reflects the concentration of the ACT’s employment in The Northern Territory workforce has a relatively low skill profile. About industries which generally require university qualifications and the relatively 42% of workers do not hold post-school qualifications compared with 39% small proportion of its employment in Manufacturing and Construction. nationally. A relatively low proportion of workers hold qualifications at the The proportion of people participating in the workforce is higher in the ACT Bachelor degree or higher level (23% compared with 26%). than the national average (73% compared with 66%). A lower proportion About 46% of workers are female and just 20% of territory workers are of the workforce is employed part-time than the national average (26% employed part-time (compared with 30% nationally). The workforce is compared with 30%) and a smaller proportion of workers are aged 45 relatively young, with 36% of workers aged 45 years or older compared years or older (36% compared with 38%). Females represent 49% of with the national figure of 38%. workers in the ACT compared with 45% nationally. Employment Growth, Year to Nov 2010 (%)12 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011
  13. 13. IndustriesINDUSTRY OVERVIEWIn which industries do Australians work? Where are the new jobs?There are 19 broad industries in Australia. The largest are Health Care and Over the five years to November 2010, more than 1.3 million jobs wereSocial Assistance and Retail Trade which employ 1.3 million and 1.2 million created. The largest growth was inworkers respectively. Construction and Manufacturing are also large • Health Care and Social Assistance (up by 275 200)employing industries, with around 1 million workers each. These four • Construction (179 400)industries combined, employ two in every five Australian workers. • Professional, Scientific and Technical Servi ces (136 100)It is interesting that, although the Mining industry experienced the largest • Education and Training (120 800)percentage rise in employment over the five years to November 2010, ithad only the eighth largest number of new jobs, reflecting its small • Transport, Postal and Warehousing (84 000).employment size.Employment in Manufacturing fell over the five years to November 2010, Which industries had decliningbut there are still nearly five times more workers employed in this industry employment?than there are in Mining. The decline in Manufacturing is part of a Employment declined in two industries over the past five years.long-term trend reflecting structural adjustment in the Australian economy. • Manufacturing (down by 33 800)It is important to note, though, that both these industries create thousands • Information Media and Telecommunications (23 700).of jobs in other industries such as Transport, Postal and Warehousing,Professional, Scientific and Technical Services and Construction. Which industries have the most jobsFor information about which industries are expected to have the most new in regional locations?jobs in the future, see page 26. Although Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing has the highest proportion of its employment in regional areas (89%), followed by Mining (58%), the following industries have the most jobs in regional areas. • Retail Trade (463 400 employed in regional Australia) • Health Care and Social Assistance (461 500) • Construction (395 800).Industry Employment Employ’t change Projected Employ’t 5 years to Nov growth Nov 2010 2010 to 2015-16 state capital part-time % workforce % of total female % years or working aged 45 cities % older % outside ‘000 ‘000 ‘000 % %IndustryAccommodation and Food Services 754.3 7 76.6 11.3 39 57 55 22 47 6.2Administrative and Support Services 411.9 4 55.7 15.6 34 41 51 39 48 11.7Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 373.6 3 24.9 7.1 89 27 32 58 27 7.3Arts and Recreation Services 189.1 2 12.4 7.0 32 43 46 31 6 3.2Construction 1047.9 9 179.4 20.7 39 14 12 34 196 18.7Education and Training 877.6 8 120.8 16.0 37 37 70 50 96 10.9Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 153.8 1 49.0 46.7 44 7 21 42 32 21.1Financial and Insurance Services 388.2 3 12.6 3.3 19 18 52 29 24 6.2Health Care and Social Assistance 1298.7 11 275.2 26.9 37 44 79 47 323 24.9Information Media and Telecommunications 215.3 2 -23.7 -9.9 22 20 44 31 13 6.0Manufacturing 992.5 9 -33.8 -3.3 35 15 26 41 -30 -3.1Mining 201.0 2 72.8 56.8 58 3 16 37 69 34.5Other Services 466.5 4 56.3 13.7 38 29 41 36 48 10.2Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 847.5 7 136.1 19.1 23 22 43 36 150 17.7Public Administration and Safety 693.2 6 80.7 13.2 43 16 47 45 41 5.9Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 213.1 2 23.7 12.5 34 27 50 38 21 9.9Retail Trade 1234.4 11 55.9 4.7 38 49 57 27 76 6.2Transport, Postal and Warehousing 583.4 5 84.0 16.8 33 20 22 47 77 13.2Wholesale Trade 406.0 4 37.3 10.1 29 16 32 41 24 5.9Total (all industries)1 11 390.1 100 1316.8 13.1 37 30 45 38 1260 11.1Source: ABS Labour Force Survey1. Trend data, totals do not addFor more information see www.skillsinfo.gov.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2011 13

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