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Photography the scientists retina: ver 3.0

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Digital imaging and image processing means that we now have capabilities far beyond what was possible with silver technologies including; High dynamic range imaging (HDRI), stitching and focus stacking and combinations of these techniques. This presentation will show examples of what is possible and how photography can aid your research and its visual impact.

“The sensitive photographic film is the true retina of the scientists . . . . for it possesses all the properties which science could want; it faithfully preserves images which deposit themselves upon it, and reproduces and multiplies them indefinitely on request; in the radiative spectrum (electromagnetic spectrum) it covers a range more than double that which the eye can perceive and soon perhaps will cover it all; finally it takes advantage of the admirable property which allows the accumulation of events, and whereas our retina erases all impressions more than a tenth of a second old, the photographic retina preserves them and accumulates them over a practically limitless time.” P.C.Janssen 1888

Version 1.0 Silver technology
Version 2.0 The New Photography from 1895 i.e. X-rays
Version 3.0 The development of digital image processing

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Photography the scientists retina: ver 3.0

  1. 1. Photography the scientist’s retina: version 3.0 David Bryson
  2. 2. Pseudomogoplistes vicentae (Scaly Cricket) Photomacrography Traditional techniques are still valuable but what more can modern techniques add?
  3. 3. Focus Stacking Increased depth of field so can see more detail even with close-ups HDRI Increased tonal range used to be called latitude Stitching Increased area either large scale or over small scale Time Lapse Recording over a period of time then speeding up
  4. 4. Focus Stacking Increased depth of field so can see more detail even with close-ups HDRI Increased tonal range used to be called latitude Stitching Increased area either large scale or over small scale Time Lapse Recording over a period of time then speeding up Post-processing
  5. 5. HDRI High Dynamic Range Imaging
  6. 6. Original Under Over Combined HDR
  7. 7. O+1 +2+3+4 -1 -2 -3 -4
  8. 8. STITCHING Panoramas, flat stitching large and small
  9. 9. Traditional panoramas
  10. 10. 35mm lens Problem photographing buildings or larger areas 24mm lens18mm lens4.5mm lens
  11. 11. Flat Stitch Photomicrography
  12. 12. Head Louse
  13. 13. Flat stitch photomacrography
  14. 14. FOCUS STACKING Up to x1 with lens focussing or by moving camera for higher magnifications
  15. 15. Depth map
  16. 16. Opium poppy seed
  17. 17. Microminerals: Chalcopyllite
  18. 18. Trilobyte eyes
  19. 19. Regal jumping spider (Phidippus regis)
  20. 20. Vespa
  21. 21. TIME LAPSE
  22. 22. GIGAPIXEL IMAGING As the name suggests images contain at least a “Giga” of pixels. Gigapan and Gigamacro even Gigamacro timelapse
  23. 23. Gigapixel panoramas
  24. 24. Fly speck created from 46 photographs at 1:1 (500Mb)
  25. 25. COMBINATIONS OF ONE OR MORE TECHNIQUES
  26. 26. Combinations in order HDR Stack Stitch
  27. 27. Combinations in order HDR Stack Stitch
  28. 28. HDR and Focus Stack
  29. 29. Stitched
  30. 30. Stacked and stitched
  31. 31. Stacked and stitched flat panoramic
  32. 32. Occipital protuberance
  33. 33. d.bryson@derby.ac.uk Pulex irritans Royal Photographic Society International Images for Science 2017
  34. 34. d.bryson@derby.ac.uk Impacted 3rd Molar Royal Photographic Society International Images for Science 2016
  35. 35. d.bryson@derby.ac.uk Rock Penguin Royal Photographic Society International Images for Science 2015

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