By Lewis B
"If I am ever really in power, the
destruction of the Jews will be my first
and most important job. As soon as I have
powe...
‘Kristallnacht’ or more commonly
known; the night of the broken glass
was a night where the Nazis gave the
Jews no remorse...
On September 15, 1935, the Nazi
government passed two new racial laws
at their annual NSDAP Reich Party
Congress in Nuremb...
By the beginning of 1942 the Germans had close to 9 million
Jews under their control (out of a total of 11 million Jews
li...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Hitler's views on jews. lewis b

460 views

Published on

Published in: Spiritual
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
460
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
16
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Hitler's views on jews. lewis b

  1. 1. By Lewis B
  2. 2. "If I am ever really in power, the destruction of the Jews will be my first and most important job. As soon as I have power, I shall have gallows after gallows erected, for example, in Munich on the Marienplatz-as many of them as traffic allows. Then the Jews will be hanged one after another, and they will stay hanging until they stink. They will stay hanging as long as hygienically possible.’’
  3. 3. ‘Kristallnacht’ or more commonly known; the night of the broken glass was a night where the Nazis gave the Jews no remorse. It happened on the 9-10th of November 1938.At least 91 Jews were killed in the attacks, and 30,000 were arrested and incarcerated in concentration camps. Jewish homes, hospitals, and schools were ransacked, as the attackers demolished buildings with sledgehammers. Over 1,000 synagogues were burned (95 in Vienna alone) and over 7,000 Jewish businesses destroyed or damaged. The interior of the Fasanenstrasse Synagogue in Berlin after Kristallnacht
  4. 4. On September 15, 1935, the Nazi government passed two new racial laws at their annual NSDAP Reich Party Congress in Nuremberg, Germany. These two laws (the Reich Citizenship Law and the Law to Protect German Blood and Honour) became collectively known as the Nuremberg Laws. These laws took German citizenship away from Jews and outlawed both marriage and sex between Jews and non-Jews. Unlike historical anti-Semitism, the Nuremberg Laws defined Jewishness by heredity (race) rather than by practice (religion).
  5. 5. By the beginning of 1942 the Germans had close to 9 million Jews under their control (out of a total of 11 million Jews living in Europe and the Soviet Union). And, of course, it was their plan to murder them all. Death Camps The final solution; the horrific gassing of all the Jews that were under Nazi control. There was 6 specific death camps, they were: Auschwitz – where 1.5 million were killed. Chelmno - where 320,000 were killed. Treblinka – where 870,000 were killed. Sobibor – where 250,000 were killed. Maidenek – where 360,000 were killed. Belzec – where 600,000 were killed. Auschwitz was the most famous death camp as it was a prolific killing machine. In 1942 Germany had control of about 9 million Jews, there were only 11 million living in Europe (and soviet union)

×