Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Language Learning in the
Linguistic Landscape
David Malinowski
Center for Language Study
Yale University
david.malinowski@...
Structure of this slideshow
1. What is the “linguistic landscape” and why is
it important?
2. Language learning motivation...
1. Definitions
What is “linguistic landscape”?
“The language of public road signs, advertising
billboards, street names, place names,
commercial shop signs, and public s...
“a far more dynamic account of space, text and
interaction [is needed in linguistic landscape
studies]: readers and writer...
Urban sociolinguistics Globalization and transnational
(strong Fr. tradition) flows of people, products, info
Language pol...
A sampling: Research in linguistic landscape
Why is LL important?
“Language Takes Place”
But it doesn’t speak for everyone
Languagingthenation
January 10, 2004: http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/10/nyregion/ethnic-friction-
over-signs-that-lack-translations.html
Langu...
August 14, 2007: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-
york/queens/give-sign-article-1.235771
Languagingethnicandculturalidentity
Prior to Japanese internment in World War II, USA
Languagingrace
Wall Street, New Haven (Yale campus area)
Languaging(andimaging)disability
Wall Street, New Haven (Yale campus area)
Languaginggender
• LL is an “independent variable” contributing to a
group’s “ethnolinguistic vitality” (Landry & Bourhis,
1997)
• The LL “...
2. Language learning motivations
What can focusing on the linguistic
landscape do for your language learning?
ACTFL National Standards for
Foreign Language Education
Three of the American Council for the Teaching of
Foreign Language...
…linguistic
…pragmatic
…intercultural
…multimodal, multiliterate
…critical, sociocultural, reflective
LL as opportunity to...
3. LL in practice
Language learning activities
and approaches
Possible activities in and with the LL
• Walking, observation, note-taking on different dimensions of the LL
including the...
How to connect them?
Try using the language you’re learning to understand the linguistic
landscape in (at least) three different ways…
1.2.
3.
Through realities that are…
1.2.
3.
Through realities that are “conceived”
Think of tools and
techniques to facilitate…
• contextualizing
• historicizing
• mapping
• categorizing
…and discussing, d...
Through realities that are “perceived”
Think of tools and
techniques to facilitate…
• observation
• listening
• sensing
• recording
…and discussing, debating,
re...
Through realities that are “lived”
Think of tools and techniques to facilitate
drawing, imagining, interviewing, designing, storytelling,
creating, protestin...
And use
each to
understand
the others
Think of tools and techniques to facilitate
drawing, imagining, interviewing, designing, storytelling,
creating, protestin...
Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
Application: Translate Your City
The language(s) you see and hear around you in public places convey powerful
messages abo...
Thank you!
David Malinowski
Center for Language Study
Yale University
david.malinowski@yale.edu
@tildensky
Linguistic Landscape for Language Study
Linguistic Landscape for Language Study
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Linguistic Landscape for Language Study

5,018 views

Published on

An introduction to the field of Linguistic Landscape and how the languages of public spaces can become a resource for language learning. Presented in Intermediate Spanish II classes, Columbia University, March 29, 2016

Published in: Education

Linguistic Landscape for Language Study

  1. 1. Language Learning in the Linguistic Landscape David Malinowski Center for Language Study Yale University david.malinowski@yale.edu @tildensky An introduction for language students Presented to: Intermediate Spanish II Columbia University March 29, 2016
  2. 2. Structure of this slideshow 1. What is the “linguistic landscape” and why is it important? 2. Language learning motivations: What can focusing on the linguistic landscape do for your language learning? 3. LL in practice: Language learning activities and approaches
  3. 3. 1. Definitions What is “linguistic landscape”?
  4. 4. “The language of public road signs, advertising billboards, street names, place names, commercial shop signs, and public signs on government building combines to form the linguistic landscape of a given territory, region or urban agglomeration” Landry & Bourhis (1997) What is linguistic landscape? (older definition)
  5. 5. “a far more dynamic account of space, text and interaction [is needed in linguistic landscape studies]: readers and writers are part of the fluid, urban semiotic space and produce meaning as they move, write, read and travel” (Pennycook 2009, 309) “attention needs to be paid to how constructs of space are constrained by material conditions of production, and informed by associated phenomenological sensibilities of mobility and gaze.” (Stroud & Mpendukana 2009, 364-5 ) What is linguistic landscape? (newer definitions)
  6. 6. Urban sociolinguistics Globalization and transnational (strong Fr. tradition) flows of people, products, info Language policy Urban studies Language planning Cultural geography Environmental psychology Multimodal, spatial, material “turns” in social Proliferation of image, theory & discourse studies geospatial technologies Some origins of “linguistic landscape” Social semiotics Geosemiotics Nexus analysis
  7. 7. A sampling: Research in linguistic landscape
  8. 8. Why is LL important? “Language Takes Place” But it doesn’t speak for everyone
  9. 9. Languagingthenation
  10. 10. January 10, 2004: http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/10/nyregion/ethnic-friction- over-signs-that-lack-translations.html Languagingethnicandculturalidentity
  11. 11. August 14, 2007: http://www.nydailynews.com/new- york/queens/give-sign-article-1.235771 Languagingethnicandculturalidentity
  12. 12. Prior to Japanese internment in World War II, USA Languagingrace
  13. 13. Wall Street, New Haven (Yale campus area) Languaging(andimaging)disability
  14. 14. Wall Street, New Haven (Yale campus area) Languaginggender
  15. 15. • LL is an “independent variable” contributing to a group’s “ethnolinguistic vitality” (Landry & Bourhis, 1997) • The LL “signals what languages are prominent and valued in public and private spaces and indexes the social positioning of people who identify with particular languages (Dagenais et al., 2009, p. 254) • Linguistic landscape reveals much about the culture, history, and politics of people in places • Linguistic landscape is one way that people mark territory, actively including some people while excluding others So, why is linguistic landscape important?
  16. 16. 2. Language learning motivations What can focusing on the linguistic landscape do for your language learning?
  17. 17. ACTFL National Standards for Foreign Language Education Three of the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language’s “Five Cs” for language learning: • Connections - “reinforce and further knowledge of other disciplines through the foreign language”; • Comparisons - “demonstrate understanding of the nature of language and culture through comparisons” • Communities - “use the language both within and beyond the school setting”
  18. 18. …linguistic …pragmatic …intercultural …multimodal, multiliterate …critical, sociocultural, reflective LL as opportunity to cultivate… New vocab, new meanings & uses for “old” vocab Grammar, metaphor, other “structures” of meaning Analyze how language is used to do things, and make/invite/suggest people do things many competences Cultivate new ways of looking at, questioning and challenging “the ordinary”
  19. 19. 3. LL in practice Language learning activities and approaches
  20. 20. Possible activities in and with the LL • Walking, observation, note-taking on different dimensions of the LL including the geographical situation and significance, social values, linguistic aspects (and relate these together) • Photograph instances of the target language in everyday environments, record interviews and conversations about LL • Print, discuss, and classify photos in class according to purpose Neighborhood descriptions and exchange of narrative texts with partner schools in other cities/regions • Drawings of familiar or favorite places, with reflection about the languages seen and heard in these places • Hand-drawn or digital mapping activities • Discussion, writing activities on questions of legitimacy and illegitimacy, power and representation in neighborhood spaces • Classroom, school, community, and/or civic-based art projects, exhibits, installations, etc. (e.g., designing & painting a new mural)
  21. 21. How to connect them?
  22. 22. Try using the language you’re learning to understand the linguistic landscape in (at least) three different ways… 1.2. 3.
  23. 23. Through realities that are… 1.2. 3.
  24. 24. Through realities that are “conceived”
  25. 25. Think of tools and techniques to facilitate… • contextualizing • historicizing • mapping • categorizing …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these Through realities that are “conceived”
  26. 26. Through realities that are “perceived”
  27. 27. Think of tools and techniques to facilitate… • observation • listening • sensing • recording …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these Through realities that are “perceived”
  28. 28. Through realities that are “lived”
  29. 29. Think of tools and techniques to facilitate drawing, imagining, interviewing, designing, storytelling, creating, protesting, enacting, etc… …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these
  30. 30. And use each to understand the others
  31. 31. Think of tools and techniques to facilitate drawing, imagining, interviewing, designing, storytelling, creating, protesting, enacting, etc… …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these Think of tools and techniques to facilitate… • observation • listening • sensing • recording …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these Think of tools and techniques to facilitate… • contextualizing • historicizing • mapping • categorizing …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these
  32. 32. Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
  33. 33. Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
  34. 34. Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
  35. 35. Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
  36. 36. Example 1: Learning from the LL on or near your campus
  37. 37. Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
  38. 38. Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
  39. 39. Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
  40. 40. Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
  41. 41. Example 2: Reading boundaries in your city
  42. 42. Application: Translate Your City The language(s) you see and hear around you in public places convey powerful messages about what histories, cultures, and identities are valued right where you are. Yet things didn’t and don’t necessarily have to look and sound the way they do now. What would your building, your neighborhood, or your city look, sound, and feel like if things were expressed differently, in the language you’re learning? (and are there any limits beyond which it’s hard to imagine?) Pick a place, a theme, a kind of text, or some elements of the linguistic landscape that you might like to change or create anew, and: • Tweet or Instagram your ideas for translating signs, marking spaces, or otherwise transforming a locale. Translations don’t have to be ‘correct’. And you can use your posts as spaces for commenting, remembering, imagining, exploring or thinking out loud—all this is part of the larger process of translation. When possible, use geo-referenced hashtags like #translateNHV (“translate”+city code) to make your posts findable, and add your location (see this page for Twitter). • Design a larger translation project like a mural or other artistic reimagining of a place, a map or visitor’s guide in the language you’re learning, a blog or website to chronicle your explorations, or…
  43. 43. Thank you! David Malinowski Center for Language Study Yale University david.malinowski@yale.edu @tildensky

×