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LAUD 2016: Learning to Translate Linguistic Landscape

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Slides from my plenary talk at the LAUD Symposium in Landau, Germany, April 6, 2016.

Conference program and materials:
https://www.uni-koblenz-landau.de/de/landau/fb6/philologien/anglistik/laudsymposium2016

Published in: Education
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LAUD 2016: Learning to Translate Linguistic Landscape

  1. 1. Learning to Translate Linguistic Landscape David Malinowski Yale University Center for Language Study david.malinowski@yale.edu TW: @tildensky This talk: http://bit.ly/LAUD2016 LAUD Symposium Landau, Germany April 6, 2016
  2. 2. Howdoyousay“Welcome!”inGerman?
  3. 3. Howdoyousay“Welcome!”inGerman?
  4. 4. Howdoyousay“Welcome!”inGerman?
  5. 5. What German word belongs on the white sign?
  6. 6. What German word belongs on the white sign?
  7. 7. (How) Would you express this in another language?
  8. 8. Working with a(nother) German-reading partner, discuss: 1. Have you seen this or similar stickers anywhere else? 2. What do you take this sticker, across from the Parkhotel, to mean? Who posted it, and why? 3. Does the message translate to another language or variety of German that you speak? Why or why not? 4. Think of a sticker or other way that you’d like to respond to this sticker, and post it here: http://bit.ly/LAUD2016
  9. 9. Translation holds particular promise, both as an approach for language learning and teaching in the linguistic landscape & more broadly, as a figure or heuristic through which linguistic landscape researchers-as-practitioners think about what it is we do, and why, and how My argument today:
  10. 10. Translation? Why not translanguaging? Codemeshing? or metrolingual multitasking?
  11. 11. Taking the perspective of a language learner...
  12. 12. Dongdaemun, Seoul, 1994 – my ‘first sign’ as a Korean learner
  13. 13. Dongdaemun, Seoul, 1994 – my ‘first sign’ as a Korean learner
  14. 14. Dongdaemun, Seoul, 1994 – my ‘first sign’ as a Korean learner trees/bushes obj. Let’s love
  15. 15. Language learning & teaching in the LL
  16. 16. ACTFL National Standards for Foreign Language Education Communication Cultures Connections Comparisons Communities
  17. 17. linguistic pragmatic intercultural multimodal, multiliterate symbolic, critical, participatory LL as opportunity to cultivate many competences
  18. 18. • Burwell, C. & Lenters, K. 2015. Word on the street: Investigating linguistic landscapes with urban Canadian youth. • Cenoz, J., & Gorter, D. (2008). The linguistic landscape as an additional source of input in SLA. • Chern, C. -l., & Dooley, K. (2014). Learning English by walking down the street. • Chesnut, M., Lee, V. & Schulte, J. (2013). The language lessons around us: Undergraduate English pedagogy and linguistic landscape research • Dagenais, D. et al. (2009). Linguistic landscape and language awareness. • Malinowski, D. (2015). Opening spaces of learning in the linguistic landscape. • Rowland, L. (2012). The pedagogical benefits of a linguistic landscape project in Japan. • Sayer, P. (2009). Using the Linguistic Landscape as a Pedagogical Resource. Language learning & teaching in the LL
  19. 19. Possible activities in and with the LL • Walking, observation, note-taking • Photography, street recordings • Recorded interviews • Classroom & online discussions, activities • Neighborhood descriptions & drawings • Mapping • Writing, blogging • Classroom and/or community-based art projects, exhibits, installations • Civic events, protests • Publication
  20. 20. is “…a living, moving activity, not a dead one to be pinned down in a museum. It is this dynamism which can make it so interesting and so stimulating, not only to linguists and translators, but to teachers and students too.” (Guy Cook, 2010, p. xix) Translation in Language Teaching
  21. 21. Translation holds particular promise, both as an approach for language learning and teaching in the linguistic landscape & more broadly, as a figure or heuristic through which linguistic landscape researchers-as-practitioners think about what it is we do, and why, and how Returning to my argument today:
  22. 22. Today: Exploring “&points” for translation Suggestion Instigation Response 1. Translation as revealing / /faultlines Miller (1992), “Translation as the double production of texts” Reading faultlines in Nash (2016), “Is linguistic landscape necessary?” 2. Translation as responsibility and response Robinson (1997), What is translation? ‘Translating’ LL methods to L2 pedagogy 3. Translation as public action and activation Venuti (1995), The translator’s invisibility “Translate New Haven” project introduction
  23. 23. Today: Exploring “&points” for translation Suggestion Instigation Response 1. Translation as revealing / /faultlines Miller (1992), “Translation as the double production of texts” Reading faultlines in Nash (2016), “Is linguistic landscape necessary?” 2. Translation as responsibility and response Robinson (1997), What is translation? ‘Translating’ LL methods to L2 pedagogy 3. Translation as public action and activation Venuti (1995), The translator’s invisibility “Translate New Haven” project introduction
  24. 24. 1. Translation as revealing / / faultlines Instigation from translation studies: Joseph Hillis Miller (1992), “Translation as the double production of texts”. In Kramsch & McConnell-Ginet (eds.), Text and context: Cross-disciplinary perspectives. D.C. Heath.
  25. 25. 1. Translation as revealing / / faultlines “A different translation produces a different original, by emphasizing different faultlines in the original, that is, by traducing the original in one way rather than another. The original is led out into the open where the translator is obliged to see hitherto hidden features.” H. Miller, 1992, p. 124
  26. 26. 1. Translation as revealing / / faultlines Response: Reading (‘target text’/LL) faultlines in a ‘translating’ text Joshua Nash, 2016. “Is linguistic landscape necessary?” Landscape Research, 41(3)
  27. 27. 1. Translation as revealing / / faultlines 1. What is the responsibility of linguistic landscape research to landscape (studies and other bordering fields)? 2. What is unique or valuable about the knowledge (theory, method, practice) that LL affords vis-a-vis its neighbors? 3. What are the affordances, limitations, and ideologies of the visual mode—and the medium of the digital image—for the representation and interpretation of data, phenomena of interest? 4. (Meta-level): What is to be gained from ‘translating’ the concerns, frameworks, methods, and practices of one field to another? Questions for LL revealed by ‘translations’ like Nash’s
  28. 28. Today: Exploring “&points” for translation Suggestion Instigation Response 1. Translation as revealing / /faultlines Miller (1992), “Translation as the double production of texts” Reading faultlines in Nash (2016), “Is linguistic landscape necessary?” 2. Translation as responsibility and response Robinson (1997), What is translation? ‘Translating’ LL methods to L2 pedagogy 3. Translation as public action and activation Venuti (1995), The translator’s invisibility “Translate New Haven” project introduction
  29. 29. Today: Exploring “&points” for translation Suggestion Instigation Response 1. Translation as revealing / /faultlines Miller (1992), “Translation as the double production of texts” Reading faultlines in Nash (2016), “Is linguistic landscape necessary?” 2. Translation as responsibility and response Robinson (1997), What is translation? ‘Translating’ LL methods to L2 pedagogy 3. Translation as public action and activation Venuti (1995), The translator’s invisibility “Translate New Haven” project introduction
  30. 30. 2. Translation as responsibility/response Instigations from translation studies: Douglas Robinson, 1997. What is translation?: Centrifugal theories, critical interventions. Kent State UP Theo Hermans, 2009. “Translation, ethics, politics”. In Munday (ed.), The Routledge companion to translation studies.
  31. 31. 2. Translation as responsibility/response “Source text” “Target text” Word-for-word? Sense-for-sense? Sourcelanguage Targetlanguage Author(s)Reader(s) Reader(s)Translator(s)
  32. 32. 2. Translation as responsibility/response "translation, enmeshed as it is in social and ideological structures, cannot be thought of as a transparent, neutral or innocent philological activity" Hermans, 2009, p. 95
  33. 33. 2. Translation as responsibility/response Response: ‘Translating’ LL methods to L2 pedagogy
  34. 34. 2. Translation as responsibility/response
  35. 35. Henri Lefebvre’s The production of space (1991) pushing innovation in LL methodologies Trumper-Hecht (2010) analysis of Arab and Jewish walkers’ perceptions of Arabic & Hebrew in Upper Nazareth 1) Investigation of official policy 2) Documentation of LL as visible to the researcher, and reading 1) in light of 2) 3) Surveys and interviews with everyday residents, reading 1) and 2) in light of 3)
  36. 36. Henri Lefebvre’s The production of space (1991) pushing innovation in LL methodologies Through juxtaposition of conceived, perceived, and lived spaces, “[add] a third dimension to linguistic landscape studies” (Trumper-Hecht, 2010, p. 236).
  37. 37. 1.2. 3. Lefebvre  Trumper-Hecht  L2 teachers’ workshops
  38. 38. Lefebvre  Trumper-Hecht  L2 teachers’ workshops
  39. 39. Think of tools and techniques to facilitate… • contextualizing • historicizing • mapping • categorizing …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these Lefebvre  Trumper-Hecht  L2 teachers’ workshops
  40. 40. Lefebvre  Trumper-Hecht  L2 teachers’ workshops
  41. 41. Think of tools and techniques to facilitate… • observation • listening • sensing • recording …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these Lefebvre  Trumper-Hecht  L2 teachers’ workshops
  42. 42. Lefebvre  Trumper-Hecht  L2 teachers’ workshops
  43. 43. Think of tools and techniques to facilitate drawing, imagining, interviewing, designing, storytelling, creating, protesting, enacting, etc… …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these
  44. 44. Think of tools and techniques to facilitate drawing, imagining, interviewing, designing, storytelling, creating, protesting, enacting, etc… …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these Think of tools and techniques to facilitate… • observation • listening • sensing • recording …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these Think of tools and techniques to facilitate… • contextualizing • historicizing • mapping • categorizing …and discussing, debating, representing, sharing these
  45. 45. Example: Reading boundaries in your city
  46. 46. Example: Reading boundaries in your city
  47. 47. Example: Reading boundaries in your city
  48. 48. Example: Reading boundaries in your city
  49. 49. Example: Reading boundaries in your city
  50. 50. Workshops and walking tours with Yale language instructors
  51. 51. NEXT WEEK (11 March 2016): Street Signs and Linguistic Landscapes By Wednesday, March 9th at 5:59 pm (Paris 23h59), each student should post a photograph of a sign from your neighborhood that you find culturally interesting and that will provoke discussion. You should post this on http://padlet.com/wall/xxxxxxxxx. Padlet is very easy; no need to sign up. Just click on the screen and you can drag/import a picture. Put a caption on it, as well as your name. (Click on the question mark on the side for more info about how to do it.) If you have trouble with this, email your picture to me at xxxxxxxxx@yale.edu and I will post it for you. Activity prompt to prep for 2-on-2 Skype conversation C. Skorupa, Yale-Télécom Paris French/English telecollaboration
  52. 52. C. Skorupa, Yale-Télécom Paris French/English telecollaboration
  53. 53. C. Skorupa, Yale-Télécom Paris French/English telecollaboration
  54. 54. R. Llopis-García, ÑYC Twitter project (#1202spn)
  55. 55. Today: Exploring “&points” for translation Suggestion Instigation Response 1. Translation as revealing / /faultlines Miller (1992), “Translation as the double production of texts” Reading faultlines in Nash (2016), “Is linguistic landscape necessary?” 2. Translation as responsibility and response Robinson (1997), What is translation? ‘Translating’ LL methods to L2 pedagogy 3. Translation as public action and activation Venuti (1995), The translator’s invisibility “Translate New Haven” project introduction
  56. 56. Today: Exploring “&points” for translation Suggestion Instigation Response 1. Translation as revealing / /faultlines Miller (1992), “Translation as the double production of texts” Reading faultlines in Nash (2016), “Is linguistic landscape necessary?” 2. Translation as responsibility and response Robinson (1997), What is translation? ‘Translating’ LL methods to L2 pedagogy 3. Translation as public action and activation Venuti (1995), The translator’s invisibility “Translate New Haven” project introduction
  57. 57. 3. Translation as public action/activation Instigation from translation studies: Lawrence Venuti, 1995. The translator’s invisibility: A history of translation. Routledge.
  58. 58. 3. Translation as public action/activation "A translated text should be the site where a different culture emerges, where a reader gets a glimpse of a cultural other” Venuti, 1995, p. 306
  59. 59. 3. Translation as public action/activation
  60. 60. 3. Translation as public action/activation
  61. 61. 3. Translation as public action/activation Response: Translate the City
  62. 62. 3. Translation as public action/activation from Translate New Haven project overview Translate New Haven is a new initiative in applied language studies at Yale and in the city of New Haven, aiming to imagine and visualize a more multilingual New Haven through translation, discussion, and collaborative “deep mapping” of language in public spaces. The project builds upon the idea of linguistic landscape where, everyday, people see with their own eyes “what languages are prominent and valued” by their society, and take in silent lessons about “the social positioning of people who identify with particular languages” (quotes from Dagenais et al., 2009)
  63. 63. 3. Translation as public action/activation Church Street, New Haven
  64. 64. 3. Translation as public action/activation Church Street, New Haven?
  65. 65. NewHavenGreen
  66. 66. NewHavenGreen?
  67. 67. NewHavenGreen?
  68. 68. Are “no loitering” and “no se permite vagabundos” semantically equivalent? Pragmatically? Legally? What other ways could this message be expressed? (in either/both English or/and Spanish, or others?) How do ‘walkers’ near this bank read this notice, feel in the neighborhood?
  69. 69. What does “authorization” mean, and who counts as “authorized personnel” and “their guests” in terms of social relationships? How might these be expressed (or not) in other languages, other geo-cultural locales in translating this sign? (can you find parallel/contrasting examples in other places?
  70. 70. Sample activity prompt: Translate Your City The language(s) you see and hear around you in public places convey powerful messages about what histories, cultures, and identities are valued right where you are. Yet things didn’t and don’t necessarily have to look and sound the way they do now. What would your building, your neighborhood, or your city look, sound, and feel like if things were expressed differently, in the language you’re learning? (and are there any limits beyond which it’s hard to imagine?) Pick a place, a theme, a kind of text, or some elements of the linguistic landscape that you might like to change or create anew, and: • Tweet or Instagram your ideas for translating signs, marking spaces, or otherwise transforming a locale. Translations don’t have to be ‘correct’. And you can use your posts as spaces for commenting, remembering, imagining, exploring or thinking out loud—all this is part of the larger process of translation. When possible, use geo-referenced hashtags like #translateNHV (“translate”+city code) to make your posts findable, and add your location (see this page for Twitter). • Design a larger translation project like a mural or other artistic reimagining of a place, a map or visitor’s guide in the language you’re learning, a blog or website to chronicle your explorations, or…
  71. 71. 3. Translation as public action/activation Translate New Haven project updates at: http://davidmalinowski.info/translate-new-haven/ To be mirrored from http://cls.yale.edu
  72. 72. Today: Exploring “&points” for translation Suggestion Instigation Response 1. Translation as revealing / /faultlines Miller (1992), “Translation as the double production of texts” Reading faultlines in Nash (2016), “Is linguistic landscape necessary?” 2. Translation as responsibility and response Robinson (1997), What is translation? ‘Translating’ LL methods to L2 pedagogy 3. Translation as public action and activation Venuti (1995), The translator’s invisibility “Translate New Haven” project introduction
  73. 73. Translation holds particular promise, both as an approach for language learning and teaching in the linguistic landscape & more broadly, as a figure or heuristic through which linguistic landscape researchers-as-practitioners think about what it is we do, and why, and how My argument today:
  74. 74. Thank you LAUD Symposium Landau, Germany April 6, 2016 David Malinowski Yale University Center for Language Study david.malinowski@yale.edu TW: @tildensky This talk: http://bit.ly/LAUD2016 And special thanks to: Candace Skorupa & students, Yale University Reyes Llopis-García & students, Columbia University

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