A tsunami (plural: tsunamis or tsunami; from
Japanese, is a series of water waves caused by
the displacement of a large vo...
Tsunami waves do not resemble normal sea
waves, because their wavelength is far longer.
Rather than appearing as a breakin...
Wave heights of tens of metres can be generated by large events.
Although the impact of tsunamis is limited to coastal are...
Etymology
The term tsunami comes from the Japanese, composed of the
two kanji (tsu) meaning "harbour" and (nami), meaning ...
History
While Japan may have the longest recorded
history of tsunamis, the sheer destruction caused
by the 2004 Indian Oce...
Seism city
Tsunami can be generated when the sea floor
abruptly deforms and vertically displaces the
overlying water. Tect...
Tsunami can be generated when the sea floor abruptly deforms
and vertically displaces the overlying water. Tectonic earthq...
A tsunami cannot be precisely predicted, even if the
magnitude and location of an earthquake is known.
Geologists, oceanog...
Japan earthquake and tsunami of 2011, also called Great Sendai
Earthquake or Great Tōhoku Earthquake, severe natural disas...
Tsunamis are caused by an underwater earthquake, a
volcanic eruption, an sub-marine rockslide, or, more
rarely, by an aste...
The Word Tsunami:
The word tsunami comes from the Japanese word meaning
"harbor wave." Tsunamis are sometimes incorrectly ...
The Development of a Tsunami:
A tsunami starts when a huge volume of water is quickly shifted.
This rapid movement can hap...
Tsunami
Tsunami
Tsunami
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Tsunami

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Tsunami

  1. 1. A tsunami (plural: tsunamis or tsunami; from Japanese, is a series of water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of a body of water, generally an ocean or a large lake. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.
  2. 2. Tsunami waves do not resemble normal sea waves, because their wavelength is far longer. Rather than appearing as a breaking wave, a tsunami may instead initially resemble a rapidly rising tide, and for this reason they are often referred to as tidal waves. Tsunamis generally consist of a series of waves with periods ranging from minutes to hours, arriving in a so-called "wave train".
  3. 3. Wave heights of tens of metres can be generated by large events. Although the impact of tsunamis is limited to coastal areas, their destructive power can be enormous and they can affect entire ocean basins; the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was among the deadliest natural disasters in human history with over 230,000 people killed in 14 countries bordering the Indian Ocean.
  4. 4. Etymology The term tsunami comes from the Japanese, composed of the two kanji (tsu) meaning "harbour" and (nami), meaning "wave". Tsunami are sometimes referred to as tidal waves, which are unusually high sea waves that are triggered especially by earthquakes.
  5. 5. History While Japan may have the longest recorded history of tsunamis, the sheer destruction caused by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami event mark it as the most devastating of its kind in modern times, killing around 230,000 people. The Sumatran region is not unused to tsunamis either, with earthquakes of varying magnitudes regularly occurring off the coast of the island.
  6. 6. Seism city Tsunami can be generated when the sea floor abruptly deforms and vertically displaces the overlying water. Tectonic earthquakes are a particular kind of earthquake that are associated with the Earth's crustal deformation; when these earthquakes occur beneath the sea, the water above the deformed area is displaced from its equilibrium position.
  7. 7. Tsunami can be generated when the sea floor abruptly deforms and vertically displaces the overlying water. Tectonic earthquakes are a particular kind of earthquake that are associated with the Earth's crustal deformation; when these earthquakes occur beneath the sea, the water above the deformed area is displaced from its equilibrium position.
  8. 8. A tsunami cannot be precisely predicted, even if the magnitude and location of an earthquake is known. Geologists, oceanographers, and seismologists analyse each earthquake and based on many factors may or may not issue a tsunami warning. However, there are some warning signs of an impending tsunami, and automated systems can provide warnings immediately after an earthquake in time to save lives. One of the most successful systems uses bottom pressure sensors, attached to buoys, which constantly monitor the pressure of the overlying water column.
  9. 9. Japan earthquake and tsunami of 2011, also called Great Sendai Earthquake or Great Tōhoku Earthquake, severe natural disaster that occurred in northeastern Japan on March 11, 2011. The event began with a powerful earthquake off the northeastern coast of Honshu, Japan’s main island, which caused widespread damage on land and initiated a series of large tsunami waves that devastated many coastal areas of the country, most notably in the Tōhoku region (northeastern Honshu). The tsunami also instigated a major nuclear accident at a power station along the coast.
  10. 10. Tsunamis are caused by an underwater earthquake, a volcanic eruption, an sub-marine rockslide, or, more rarely, by an asteroid or meteoroid crashing into in the water from space. Most tsunamis are caused by underwater earthquakes, but not all underwater earthquakes cause tsunamis - an earthquake has to be over about magnitude 6.75 on the Richter scale for it to cause a tsunami. About 90 percent of all tsunamis occur in the Pacific Ocean.
  11. 11. The Word Tsunami: The word tsunami comes from the Japanese word meaning "harbor wave." Tsunamis are sometimes incorrectly called "tidal waves" -- tsunamis are not caused by the tides (tides are caused by the gravitational force of the moon on the sea). Regular waves are caused by the wind.
  12. 12. The Development of a Tsunami: A tsunami starts when a huge volume of water is quickly shifted. This rapid movement can happen as the result of an underwater earthquake (when the sea floor quickly moves up or down), a rock slide, a volcanic eruption, or another high-energy event.

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