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Museums Give Teachers Control to Create

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SXSWEdu 2016
Wednesday, March 9
3:30PM - 4:30P

Published in: Education
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Museums Give Teachers Control to Create

  1. 1. Museums Give Teachers Control to Create learninglab.si.edu @SmithsonianLab SXSWEdu 2016 Wednesday, March 9 3:30PM - 4:30PM These slides: s.si.edu/SLIDEPARTY!!!
  2. 2. Who Are We? Brian Ausland Director, Education Research Navigation North Learning @bausland / brian@navnorth.com Ashley Naranjo Learning Initiatives Specialist Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access Smithsonian Institution @AshleyMNaranjo / naranjoa@si.edu Darren Milligan Senior Digital Strategist Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access Smithsonian Institution @darrenmilligan / milligand@si.edu Melissa Wadman Manager of Program Evaluation Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access Smithsonian Institution @melwad / wadmanm@si.edu
  3. 3. Who Are You? Visit: slido.com Code: #sxswedu Choose: Hilton, 400/402
  4. 4. This Afternoon 1. Schools and Digital Media: So What? 2. Why the Smithsonian? 3. Research 4. Smithsonian Learning Lab 5. In the Hands of Teachers 6. What’s Next? 7. Q/A
  5. 5. This Afternoon 1. Schools and Digital Media: So What? 2. Why the Smithsonian? 3. Research 4. Smithsonian Learning Lab 5. In the Hands of Teachers 6. What’s Next? 7. Q/A
  6. 6. Models
  7. 7. Educator Annotation
  8. 8. This Afternoon 1. Schools and Digital Media: So What? 2. Why the Smithsonian? 3. Research 4. Smithsonian Learning Lab 5. In the Hands of Teachers 6. What’s Next? 7. Q/A
  9. 9. Source: Frontline Design, http://www.frontlinedesign.org/project/night-at-the-museum-2-battle-of-the-smithsonian
  10. 10. Image from Flickr user Mike Procario, https://www.flickr.com/photos/procario/11060000573/, used under a CC BY-ND 2.0license.
  11. 11. Smithsonian (in 2015) 19 Museums and Galleries & National Zoo
  12. 12. Smithsonian (in 2015) 19 Museums and Galleries & National Zoo 138.1M Museums Objects & Specimens 2.1M Library Volumes 136,194 Cubic feet of archival material
  13. 13. Smithsonian (in 2015) 19 Museums and Galleries & National Zoo 138.1M Museums Objects & Specimens 2.1M Library Volumes 136,194 Cubic feet of archival material 6,511 Employees 721 Research Fellows 12,047 Volunteers
  14. 14. 1995 23.6 million physical visits to museums 72,942 digital visits
  15. 15. 1995 23.6 million physical visits to museums 72,942 digital visits 2015 26.7 million physical visits to museums 116 million digital visits
  16. 16. 1995 23.6 million physical visits to museums 72,942 digital visits 2015 26.7 million physical visits to museums 116 million digital visits Physical: 26,700,000-23,600,000 / 23,600,000 X 100 = 13.16% increase Digital: 116,000,000-72,942 / 72,942 X 100 = 158,930.5% increase
  17. 17. 1995 23.6 million physical visits to museums 72,942 digital visits 2015 26.7 million physical visits to museums 116 million digital visits Physical: 26,700,000-23,600,000 / 23,600,000 X 100 = 13.16% increase Digital: 116,000,000-72,942 / 72,942 X 100 = 158,930.5% increase
  18. 18. Pew Research Teachers Survey Report February 2013 92%: Internet has “major impact” on their ability to access content, resources, and materials for their teaching 90%: use search engines to find info 84%: use Internet weekly to find content that will engage students 80%: use Internet weekly to help them create lessons
  19. 19. Image: Haxorjoe at en.wikipedia, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nokia1100_new.jpg, used under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.
  20. 20. The Problem Fragmented Brand Outdated Platform Lack of Detailed Data Who is using our resources? Why are they using them? How are they using them? Where are they using them? How would they prefer to access them? In what format would they prefer them? Are they using them as designed? Are students learning from them…?
  21. 21. This Afternoon 1. Schools and Digital Media: So What? 2. Why the Smithsonian? 3. Research 4. Smithsonian Learning Lab 5. In the Hands of Teachers 6. What’s Next? 7. Q/A
  22. 22. Remedial Evaluation of the Materials Distributed at the Smithsonian Institution’s Annual Teachers’ Night (2010) Literature review and evaluation to produce generalizable guidelines for the design and development of museum-based lesson plans and investigated classroom educator methodologies for incorporating museum-based lessons into classrooms.
  23. 23. Capturing the Voice of Customer, Satisfaction Insight Review of SmithsonianEducation.org (2011) Collected from more than seven thousand surveys completed by visitors to the central Smithsonian Education website, the makeup of this audience, their motivations for site visitation, their activities while on the website, and their sources of dissatisfaction were explored.
  24. 24. Digital Learning Resources Project (2012) To assist the Smithsonian to better understand the educational uses of Smithsonian digital resources and provide a road map for future digital development. Research objectives focused on classroom educators’ ability to identify, analyze, and extract digital content, with the ultimate goal of enabling all users to achieve their own personal learning objectives through the Smithsonian’s resources.
  25. 25. Piloting Tools to Enable Active and Participatory Learning for Middle School Students: Facilitating Digital Learning with Smithsonian Digital Resources (2014) Classroom educators have indicated that relevance to students’ needs are a top priority. We are now testing directly with students to better understand how they use digital museum assets (specifically digitized collection objects) and to document the types of scaffolds necessary to enable active and participatory learning using them.
  26. 26. Results META TIME! Conclusions Focused on • Educator search preferences • Factors that contribute to difficult analysis and resistance to use learning resources • Educators’ preferences for learning resources • Educators’ preferences for platform content and functionality
  27. 27. Educator Search Preferences • Searching assist via autocomplete and/or spelling assist • Search results that allow for both browsing and filtering • Scannable grade level and subject information • Resources from a wide variety of sources
  28. 28. Factors that Contribute to Difficult Analysis and Resistance to Use Learning Resources • Too many search results; too difficult to browse quickly for relevant content • Distracting user interfaces • Unfamiliar terminology and/or lack of contextual information
  29. 29. Educators’ Preferences for Learning Resources • Interdisciplinary and/or multidisciplinary • Connection to students’ interests • Alignment to teaching standards and/or relationship to big ideas • Highly Adaptable • Downloadable format
  30. 30. Educators’ Preferences for Platform Content and Functionality • Content available from more than one one producer/supplier • Tools available within the platform for student interaction with the resources • Variety of sharing options • Ability to save and structure resources within the platform for later review/use
  31. 31. learninglab.si.edu
  32. 32. Smithsonian Digitization 138 million objects and specimens Two million library volumes 153,000 cubic feet of archival material
  33. 33. Smithsonian Digitization 138 million objects and specimens 9% objects and specimens Two million library volumes 33% library volumes 153,000 cubic feet of archival material 52% archival material
  34. 34. Smithsonian Digitization 138 million objects and specimens 9% objects and specimens 12 million digitized objects & specimens Two million library volumes 33% library volumes 660,000 digitized library volumes 153,000 cubic feet of archival material 52% archival material 80,000 cubic feet of archival material
  35. 35. Learning Lab Today 1.41 million resources 1.32 million images 40,800 text-based resources 11,500 video and audio files 2,100 lesson plans and website 332 user/institutionally-generated published collections 1,825 total collections
  36. 36. This Afternoon 1. Schools and Digital Media: So What? 2. Why the Smithsonian? 3. Research 4. Smithsonian Learning Lab 5. In the Hands of Teachers 6. What’s Next? 7. Q/A
  37. 37. First Grade Montpelier, VT
  38. 38. AP U.S. History Alexandria, VA
  39. 39. High School English Lincoln, NE
  40. 40. Middle School Social Studies Glenshaw, PA
  41. 41. Smithsonian Washington, DC
  42. 42. Smithsonian Washington, DC
  43. 43. This Afternoon 1. Schools and Digital Media: So What? 2. Why the Smithsonian? 3. Research 4. Smithsonian Learning Lab 5. In the Hands of Teachers 6. What’s Next? 7. Q/A
  44. 44. This Afternoon 1. Schools and Digital Media: So What? 2. Why the Smithsonian? 3. Research 4. Smithsonian Learning Lab 5. In the Hands of Teachers 6. What’s Next? 7. Q/A
  45. 45. learninglab@si.edu @SmithsonianLab Slides: Darren Milligan @darrenmilligan / milligand@si.edu Melissa Wadman @melwad / wadmanm@si.edu Brian Ausland @bausland / brian@navnorth.com Ashley Naranjo @AshleyMNaranjo / naranjoa@si.edu

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