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Las vegas preferred plan presentation boards

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Vision LV workshop/open house boards

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Las vegas preferred plan presentation boards

  1. 1. 1 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 IN ORDERTO BETTER ANTICIPATE GROWTH AND CHANGE,THE STUDY AREA WAS EXPANDED. STUDY AREA & PROCESS WHERE ARE WE RIGHT NOW? More than 4X the Area of the Centennial Plan, the Study Area encompasses some 4.3 square miles of land, addressing several key issues: Historic Neighborhoods traditionally considered the core of Downtown need to be strengthened through development controls and investment in community oriented amenities that make Downtown more livable. Key growth areas such as the Cashman District, 18B Arts District, Medical District, Symphony Park and Historic Westside all need special incentives to reach their full potential as functional mixed use districts. These growing areas will all support and augment the experience of Downtown, improved connectivity to them will be catalytic to the local economy. Spheres of influence support the Downtown core while benefiting from increased services and improved mobility into and out of Downtown. These areas need help to preserve neighborhood character while attracting investment along key streets and mobility corridors leading in and out of Downtown. LETS GO BUILD IT!! OCT. 2014 JAN. 2015 APR. 2015 JUN. 2015 AUG. 2015 NOV. 2015 NOV/DEC. 2014 FEB. 2015 MAY. 2015 JUL. 2015 OCT. 2015 KICK OFF STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS 2 COMMUNITY OUTREACH EVENTS - BACKGROUND ANALYSIS 2 COMMUNITY OUTREACH EVENTS - FINAL PLAN FINAL OPEN HOUSE 2 COMMUNITY OUTREACH EVENTS - VISIONING VISION PLAN 2 COMMUNITY OUTREACH EVENTS - ALTERNATIVE PLAN ESC MEETING ESC MEETING BACKGROUND REPORT CONCEPT PLAN DEVELOPMENT ALTERNATIVE PLAN DEVELOPMENT 2 COMMUNITY OUTREACH EVENTS - PREFERRED PLAN WE ARE HERE! MAR. 2016 2000 CENTENNIAL PLAN *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only.
  2. 2. 2 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 Downtown Las Vegas has its share of challenges that must be addressed in future plans. REALITIES LACK OF SUFFICIENT INVESTMENT POVERTY AND HOMELESSNESS HIGHER HOUSING VACANCY RATES LACK OF PARKS AND OPEN SPACE OVERABUNDANCE OF VACANT LAND = 5% below poverty level In 2014 around $500 million in committed projects were located in the Downtown Study area. This is a small percentage of investment when compared to many upcoming cities. For example, in Downtown Detroit investment is 4X more than in Las Vegas for a similar population, which implies the need for incentives to promote growth. Poverty Rates in Downtown Study Area are 200% more than Clark County, implying the need for more social services in Downtown. Only 1% of land is given to parks and open space in the Downtown study area. This implies the need for additional open spaces of all kinds that create a network of parks, plazas, and green streets. 250 acres of vacant land accounts for 11% of the total Downtown study area. So much area implies the need to focus development in clusters that maximize impact where appropriate. Housing Vacancy Rates in the Downtown Study Area are 300% more than that of Clark County, which implies that affordability and a lack of housing diversity are issues that need to be addressed in future planning efforts. Housing Vacancy Rates = 1 acre of parkland per 10,000 residents Percentage of vacant land in Downtown Las Vegas VACANT LAND US dollars planned for Downtown redevelopment in 2014 *Images are for illustrative purposes only.
  3. 3. 3 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 NEEDED IMPROVEMENTS SYMPHONY PARK BRIDGE SOUTHERN NEVADA LIGHT RAIL VISION MONORAIL / URBAN GONDOLA DOWNTOWN CIRCULATOR EXPANDED BIKE NETWORKS /TRAILS PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES SC2 COMPETITION WINNERS MOBILITY SURVEY FREEWAY IMPROVEMENTS A study to link Symphony Park to Downtown via a pedestrian, bicycle and vehicle bridge. Alternative alignments include Lewis and Bridger Avenues. CHARLESTON BLVD CORRIDOR A study to transform Charleston into a multi-modal “complete street.” The 8 lane right-of- way is narrowed to 6, with new transit and bike lanes, improved sidewalks and increased tree canopy. The City of Las Vegas is engaging in a number of planning initiatives that will profoundly impact Downtown Las Vegas. A study to determine the viability or a 26 mile light rail link between a proposed regional park & ride at Town Center Drive to the West, and the Bonneville Transit Center to the East. A cost / benefit study that investigates extending the monorail system to serve Downtown while improving linkages to the Airport and UNLV. Technologies include a people mover, aerial tram, and / or urban gondola. A proposal for reinstatement of the Downtown circulator which served Downtown in the pre-recession era. Rubber tire service allows maximum flexibility / frequency and could serve day time workforce as well as local tourists. A number of studies are currently looking at the viability of increased bike access and services, including a network of protected bike lanes. A bike share program is scheduled to begin operation in August 2016. Two proposals study the viability of resolving conflicts between pedestrians and other vehicles through grade separation: a pedestrian bridge at the intersection of Sahara and Las Vegas Blvd has the potential to act as a district gateway, and the Symphony Park pedestrian Bridge which will address the physical barrier of the train right-of-way. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Economy Development Administration, the City engaged in an “ideas” competition studying future visions for the City. In particular, 3 schemes have attracted particular interest. They are: “Build a better Las Vegas” (http://sh- architecture.com/portfolio/uarrc); “NEXT Revitalization + Urban Innovation” (http://www. sc2lasvegas.com/ ); and “the Cashman Battery” (http://www.genslerlvsc2.com). Thousands of residents have responded to a survey about future mobility. 94% said they would use light rail, and 57% said they would like to see more bike lanes in Downtown. Currently 91% of all trips are by car. Roughly $2.9 Billion will be invested in the coming years into future improvements to the freeways surrounding Downtown, including freeway interchanges, ramps, and pedestrian bridges. CONCEPTUAL PROPOSAL “A” CHARLESTON BLVD LOOKING WEST AT BRUCE ST. - EXISTING SOUTHERN NEVADA LIGHT RAIL VISION DOWNTOWN MONORAIL ALTERNATIVE DOWNTOWN CIRCULATOR - 6 MILE LOOP DOWNTOWN CIRCULATOR - BUS (ILLUSTRATIVE ONLY) CHARLESTON BLVD LOOKING WEST AT BRUCE ST. - PROPOSED CHARLESTON LIGHT RAIL CORRIDOR CONCEPT URBAN GONDOLA LAS VEGAS MONORAIL TO DOWNTOWN MULTI-USE TRAILS PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIVITY TO SYMPHONY PARK DOWNTOWN BIKE SHARE PROGRAM PROPOSED CIRCULAR PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE - SAHARA / LV BLVD PROPOSAL OF “BUILD A BETTER LAS VEGAS” PROPOSAL OF “NEXT” PROPOSAL OF “THE CASHMAN BATTERY” POP-UP MEETINGS & MOBILITY SURVEY MOBILITY SURVEY RESULTS REGIONAL FREEWAY IMPROVEMENTS FREEWAY MAINLINE IMPROVEMENTS CONCEPTUAL PROPOSAL “B” *Images and proposals are sourced from: M. Janssen, P.E. PTOE., CLV Public Works, Citywide Strategic PlanTransportation Priority Update; B. Wiegand, etc., UARRC-Build a better Las Vegas; assemblageSTUDIO + Stalk,NEXT Revitalization + Urban Innovation; Gensler, the Cashman Battery
  4. 4. 4 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 PRIMINGTHE MARKET While continuing to rebound from the Great Recession, Downtown Las Vegas has shown potential for a major building boom in the next 20 years. Growth sectors include: PREFERRED SCENARIO: SUPER AGGRESSIVE *ASSUME THE AVERAGE SIZE OF ONE HOUSING UNIT RANGES FROM 800 SQ. FT. TO 1,200 SQ. FT. BASED ON THE SPECIFIC HOUSING TYPES 3.7M SF TOTAL 11.8 M SF TOTAL RESIDENTIAL 6.9M SF (6,500 Units*) RETAIL & RELATED 700K SF HOTEL & GAMING OFFICE INSTITUTIONAL INDUSTRIAL / FLEX 515K SF 2.1M SF 1.2M SF 339K SF DEVELOPMENT PROJECTIONS HOUSING: Growth potential exists for mid-rise housing that provides greater affordability for young families. Housing of moderate scale with access to transit and open space is particularly important. Townhouses, flats, and multi-family units are all in demand. RETAIL: An urban format grocery store, drugstore or urban multi- level format retailer along with neighborhood-serving retail will drive future growth in Downtown. OFFICE: High tech campus style developments as well as limited “Class A” high-rise office will add to the job base of Downtown Las Vegas. GAMING +TOURISM: Gaming will remain an important part of the local economy, further opportunities are projected in spin-offs of the gaming industry such as conventions, business hotels, tourist booking and management, cultural and culinary tourism. INSTITUTIONAL + CIVIC: The expansion of the Medical District will create opportunities for economic spinoffs in Bio- Tech + Manufacturing. New institutions including a Downtown campus with other institutions for robotics, film production, and other creative arts could complement Downtown. INDUSTRIAL R&D: Adaptive use of warehouse buildings and some new “flex” developments will accommodate the changing nature of the modern workplace in the creative age. THE DOWNTOWN MARKET AREATODAY: Downtown Las Vegas remains the historic core of the valley; in addition to the gaming industry, Downtown hosts a large professional service sector, and an emerging economy in high- tech, e-commerce, and the arts. TRENDS: Workers now seek a live/work/play environment. The funky nature of Downtown with its walkable blocks, bars, restaurants, and creative businesses are a perfect canvas for growth. Successful cities plan for the future by: • Removing administrative hurdles • Establishing local entrepreneurship programs • Focusing on locally controlled incentives • Launching an economic development capital fund THETHREE SCENARIOS The three scenarios (conservative, moderate and aggressive) as shown on the left were developed as a result of trends including the diversification of the post recession economy, the role of Downtown as a tourist destination, and the increased levels of collaboration between business and government in Downtown. *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. 11.8 MILLION SF IS EQUIVALENT TO JUHL LOFTS X 30 The super aggressive scenario is based upon a number of incentives and investments, including 1) creating streamlined governance through expedited approvals and form based coding that will clarify the city’s expectation for development; 2) targeted land assembly and redevelopment zones for public and private investment; 3) creation of a district wide business improvement district (BID); 4) investment in infrastructure including public streets and open space networks, and 5) creation of key partnerships with educators, major sports, cultural institutions, and major businesses to promote investment in downtown. It is thought these strategies could triple market demand over the next 20 years. * ASSUME THE GROSS BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE OF JUHL LOFT APPROXIMATES TO 400,000 SF. • The total amount of conceptual development based on super aggressive scenario is approximately 12 million sq. ft. • Roughly 60% of future development is anticipated to be residential. This includes approximately 6,500 dwelling units, encompassing townhomes, duplexes, workforce, live/work lofts, and special housing types (i.e., senior, student, and temporary housing.) The conceptual housing yield is approximately 150% of the “aggressive” market projection. • Around 10% of future development will be commercial uses, of which approximately 700,000 sq. ft. is retail and related uses (33% lower than the “aggressive“ scenario.) New hospitality development is around 515,000 sq. ft., including resorts & casinos, business and boutique hotels. This sector is around 50% lower than the “aggressive“ market projection though it could be counterbalanced by a higher housing unit development in the future. • Approximately 21% of future development is employment, around 2.5 million sq. ft., including professional office, Class-A office, R&D incubators, and light manufacturing flex. • 11% of the development is expected to be civic and institutional, approximate 1.2 million sq. ft., including public/semi-public facilities, university- related facilities, vocational school, and K-12 campus.
  5. 5. 5 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 EXTENSIVE OUTREACH Stakeholder interviews, public outreach workshops, and online polls determine the best course of action for our work. 100+ STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS 10 CITY COUNCIL MEMBER & EXECUTIVE STEERING COMMITTEE MEETINGS 2,400 COMMUNITY OUTREACH PARTICIPANTS 20,000 WEBSITE VISITS 900 SHARES VIA SOCIAL MEDIA (EMAIL, FACEBOOK, LINKEDIN, & TWITTER) 63% PREFERRED OPTION 3 STAKEHOLDER HIGHLIGHTS KEYTHEMES IMPORTANTTOTHE COMMUNITY Glad I didn’t give up. We persevered. A safe bike friendly city. Don’t let perfection stand in the way of great. “ “ “ “ ” ” ” ” - Marilyn Gillespie - Dave Swallow - Melissa Petersen It’s a place to call home. ” “ - Paco Alvarez An all-inclusive (including the disadvantaged in the community) plan that is truly comprehensive. ” ” “ “ - Arnold Stalk - Rich Worthington “A city here our leaders are able to thrive and take us into the future – creating global citizens. ”- Sallie Doebler “ “ ” - Mel Green - Chris Ramirez Go from food justice to food for Mars. “ ”- Richard Passo ” ” “ “ - Steve Clarke - Michael Cornthwait We want to transform the city because we want to stay here - its unique like no other. Arts District for the locals. “Robbin from the Hood – public works project fees fund what they do here. ”A vibrant, energized, developed urban core that strikes a balance between a connection to the Millennials and other younger generations while at the same time respecting tradition, and historical development of older generations. “ ” - Ken Evans Get out of the way of good development. A true city, large population growth. Finally a Main Street that is even better than Bedford. ”- Polly Weinstein The City needs to be accountable and perhaps only an outside consultant can suggest a way forward. Las Vegas: it’s time. - Zach Conine Promote GAMING / TOURISM in Downtown First Options around MOBILITY A BRANDING and MARKETING CAMPAIGN Coordinate SERVICES for the HOMELESS Standards for RENEWABLE ENERGY PEOPLE are PASSIONATE about Downtown Create more PARKS and GREEN STREETS Provide HOUSING / COMMUNITY AMENITIES Mix of RETAIL and ENTERTAINMENT Focus on EDUCATION “BYTHE NUMBERS“ *Images are for illustrative purposes only. 1 2 3 CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE CULTURAL CAPITAL LIFESTYLE HUBS
  6. 6. 6 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 VISION + GOALS From the excitement of gaming to historic neighborhoods, the vitality of the Arts District and the creative wave of technology entrepreneurs, the growing Medical District and live events, Downtown Las Vegas is the vital heart of one of the most diverse and compelling cities in North America. Downtown Las Vegas is where it all began and continues to evolve. A creative collaboration between residents, businesses and visitors, it welcomes diversity, entrepreneurship, and fosters pride, always looking toward the future. DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS REINVENTED WHAT ARE DTLV’S CORE VALUES? TASTEFUL CITY Cultured Brash Ingenious PROGRESSIVE CITY Insightful Accomplished Focused ENTERTAINING CITY Spectacular Inspired Seductive LOCALIZED CITY Vibrant Energetic Courageous VISIONARY CITY Disciplined Informed Driven ARTFUL CITY Exuberant Youthful Thoughtful ACTIVE CITY Invigorating Surprising Enticing THE VISION STATEMENT GOALS FORTHE PLAN DEVELOPEDTHROUGH EXTENSIVE PUBLIC OUTREACH URBAN LIFESTYLE | MIXED USE | TRANSIT HUB | HIGHER DENSITY | INFILL & REDEVELOPMENT INNOVATION DISTRICT | TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT | PEDESTRIAN & BIKE CONNECTIONS | MULTIPLE ACCESS | PUBLIC REALM IMPROVEMENTS NET-ZERO ENERGY USAGE | PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS | | DISTRICT AMBIENT LOOP | PLUG-LOAD MANAGEMENT | THERMAL STORAGE CENTRAL PARK | EVENT PLAZAS | POCKET PARKS | COMMUNITY GARDENS | PLAY COURTS | TRAIL CONNECTIONS | THERMAL COMFORT RENAISSANCE ZONE | DOWNTOWN BID | ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CAPITAL FUND | STREAMLINED APPROVAL PROCESS | COMMUNITY BENEFIT PROGRAM MODERN ART MUSEUM | ART GALLERIES | CELEBRATIONS & FESTIVALS | LIVE CONCERTS | SPORTS EVENT | FARMERS MARKET GAMING & HOSPITALITY | CREATIVE & TECH | MEDICAL & HEALTH CARE | CULTURAL TOURISM | ROBOTICS | CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE | JOBS | EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES MIXED USE HUBS SEAMLESS CONNECTIONS DIVERSIFIED ECONOMY LOCAL RETAIL | BOUTIQUES | DAILY SERVICES | GROCERIES | CAFES | RESTAURANTS | CIVIC FACILITIES DISTINCT DISTRICTS | DESIGN GUIDANCE | MULTI-USE GATHERING SPACES | WAYFINDING | PUBLIC ART ACCESSIBLE SERVICES COMMUNITY RESILIENCE ABUNDANT ENTERTAINMENT & CULTURE VITAL PLACES GREEN NETWORK SMART MANAGEMENT *Images are for illustrative purposes only.
  7. 7. 7 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 PREFERRED SCENARIO PROPOSED LAND USE MIX YIELD SUMMARY BY LAND USETYPE LAND USE GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) RESIDENTIAL 6,889,500 (Dwelling Units) 6,471 COMMERCIAL 1,214,500 RETAIL 699,500 HOSPITALITY 515,000 EMPLOYMENT 2,456,000 OFFICE 2,117,000 R&D 339,000 CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL 1,219,500 CIVIC 260,500 INSTITUTIONAL 745,000 K-12 EDUCATION 214,000 TOTAL BLDG AREA (GSF) 11,779,500 OPEN SPACE NEW PARKS 24 (AC) NEW GREEN STREETS 30 (MI) CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT LAND USE MIX RESID EMPL 21% CIVIC & INSTI 10% LAND USE GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) RESIDENTIAL 6,889,500 (Dwelling Units) 6,471 COMMERCIAL 1,214,500 RETAIL 699,500 HOSPITALITY 515,000 EMPLOYMENT 2,456,000 OFFICE 2,117,000 R&D 339,000 CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL 1,219,500 CIVIC 260,500 INSTITUTIONAL 745,000 K-12 EDUCATION 214,000 TOTAL BLDG AREA (GSF) 11,779,500 OPEN SPACE NEW PARKS 24 (AC) NEW GREEN STREETS 30 (MI) CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT LAND USE MIX RESID 59%COMM 10% EMPL 21% CIVIC & INSTI 10% Based upon outreach from online polling and face-to-face interactions, the preferred scenario combines the transportation framework of “Lifestyle Hubs” (Option 2) with the investment strategies of “Centers of Excellence” (Option 3). LOOKING FROM THE STRATOSPHERE TOWER *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. HISTORIC WESTSIDEMEDICAL SYMPHONY PARK CIVIC & BUSINESS CASHMAN FREMONT EAST FOUNDERS 18B ARTS SYMPHONY PARK A CULTURAL AND LIVING DISTRICT BETTER CONNECTED TO DOWNTOWN 1 CIVIC & BUSINESS A DOWNTOWN CORE AND MORE2 18B ARTS A REGIONAL SHOWCASE FOR THE ARTS AND A COMMUNITY OF DIVERSITY 3 FREMONT EAST IMPROVED AFFORDABILITY, SAFETY AND AMENITY4 8 CASHMAN A COMMUNITY OF ENTREPRENEURS ANCHORED BY SPORTS, AND CULTURE FOUNDERS A HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD OF DOWNTOWN AUGMENTED WITH TRANSIT 5 THE CENTER OF RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND HEALTHCARE FOR SOUTHERN NEVADA MEDICAL6 HISTORIC WESTSIDE A REVITALIZED AND DIVERSE HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD7 76 1 2 8 4 5 3 CHARLESTON BLVDCHARLESTON BLVD ALTA DR WASHINGTON AVE BONANZA RD FREMONT ST CASIN O CRT BLVD 3RD ST M AIN ST 6TH ST LAS VEG AS BLVD CARSON AVE CHARLESTON BLVDCHARLESTON BLVD ALTA DR WASHINGTON AVE BONANZA RD FREMONT ST CASIN O CTR BLVD M.L.K.BLVD M.L.K.BLVD 3RD ST M AIN ST 6TH ST LAS VEG AS BLVD CARSON AVE MARYLANDPKWY MARYLANDPKWY LEGEND Single Fam ily H om e Professional O ffice Class-A O ffice R& D Incubator M edicalO ffice / Lab M edicalSupple M anufacturing M useum G allery Creative O ffice / M akerSpace RESID EN TIAL O FFICE RELATED CO M M ERCIAL CIVIC / IN STITUTIO N AL D uplex / Tow nhom e W orkforce / Affordable H ousingLive/w ork Lofts above shops H igh-rise Apartm ents w /parking podium StudentH ousing Cafe /Restaurants /Bars Convention Ctr. Service Retail RepertoryTheater LocalEntertainm ent Com m unity /SeniorCtr. H otel/Resort VocationalSchool U niversity-related K-12 Education Stadium SeniorH ousing Tem porary H ousing
  8. 8. 8 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 24 AC 7 LINEAR MILES 15 LINEAR MILES 15 AC 48 LINEAR MILES48 AC 245 AC45 LINEAR MILES 685%200% 300% 1600% COMMUNITY BENEFITS SOCIAL & ECONOMIC BENEFITS 960,000 SF OF EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES FOR LEARNING & OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING 739,000 SF OF NEW RETAIL & SERVICES 2,500 UNITS OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING CLOSE TO TRANSIT ASSUME 40% OF HOUSING UNITS ALL WITHIN 5-MIN WALK OF TRANSIT 16,000 PERMANENT JOBS GENERATED SOURCE: THE INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERS (ITE) & THE URBAN LAND INSTITUTE (ULI) ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS COMMUTE MODE SPLIT FOR DOWNTOWN RESIDENTS 2035 TARGETEXISTING PUBLIC REALM IMPROVEMENT PARKS + PLAZAS TREE CANOPY 1% 11% 74% 14% 5% 20% 50% 25% When implemented, the Plan will provide tangible benefits to the Downtown community. These include significant economic, social, and environmental improvements in district performance. COMMUNITY RESILIENCY 50% OF DOWNTOWN ENERGY PROVIDED BY GREEN POWER The ability to get around by bicycle expands the reach of the transportation network while providing much needed alternatives to the automobile for short trips within downtown, as well as recreational biking trails to regional open spaces. Parks and open spaces are essential to urban life. They provide a place for recreation, cool the ambient temperature, and provide a meaningful respite from the city. The Masterplan envisions a diversified complement of open spaces that promote a higher quality of life for residents, workers, and visitors to DTLV. Pedestrian areas are also greatly expanded from new and expanded sidewalks within urban areas to walking and running trails along the train right of way and beyond. Trees are a real need in DTLV. “Urban heat island” is most effected by the lack of tree canopy within the CBD, where tall buildings and reflective materials are most prevalent. The Masterplan calls for a significant increase of drought tolerant trees lining most major streets. The cumulative effect of these plantings can significantly reduce ambient temperature. BIKE NETWORK URBAN TRAILS EXISTING EXISTING EXISTING EXISTING PROPOSED PROPOSEDPROPOSED PROPOSED *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. SOURCE: THE INTEGRAL GROUP SOURCE: FEHR & PEERS SOURCE: THE INTEGRAL GROUP 75% WASTE DIVERTED FROM LAND FILLS
  9. 9. 9 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 WHAT IS A MIXED USE HUB? FREMONT EAST MIXED USE HUB W/ 5-MIN WALKING RADII COMMUNITY SPORTS PARK & SCULPTURE PARK ALONG UPRRMAIN ST. STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENT COMMUNITY CTR. PLAY FIELDS MEDICAL CLINIC SHELTER/TEMP. HOUSING CONTINUING EDUCATION / TRAINING SCH. SENIOR CTR. POLICE SUBSTATION POST OFFICE CORNER RETAIL / RESTAURANTS URBAN FORMAT GROCERY STORE & PHARMACY TRANSIT STATION NEIGHBORHOOD PARK A MIXED USE HUB is a type of development that can meet that challenge. Typically configured in a compact area of 4 to 10 city blocks, mixed land uses, open spaces, and transit access are all offered in close proximity. Key features of a mixed use hub include: • Mix of Housing Options: required balance of affordable, market rate, and luxury options • Employment Opportunities: nearby service, professional, and skilled jobs • Community Amenities: shopping, dining, continuing education, daycare, convenience retail services, community services • Multi-ModalTransportation Options: pedestrian oriented streets that accommodate cars with public transit stops at the center of the hub • Multi-Functional Open Spaces: Casual or “passive” uses amidst designated or “active” uses that support athletics, special events, relaxation, and natural ecology • Cultural Events and Institutions: Entertainment and cultural opportunities such as galleries, small theaters, and public plazas • Food & Beverage Offerings: Access to healthy food and groceries that meet everyday needs in addition to higher end dining and beverage options THE BENEFITS OF MIXED USE HUBS ARE NUMEROUS Relative to the opportunities presented by the market, Downtown Las Vegas has a significant amount of open land. The primary challenge is to find a way to cluster development that improves the quality of life, helps local businesses grow, while stewarding resources most responsibly. MIXED USE HUB CONCEPT A TRANSIT HUB WITH COMMUNITY AMENITIES OPEN SPACE FOR OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES + RELAXATION A STREET AS A PUBLIC PLACE BEFORE AFTER Trees, wide sidewalks, and other pedestrian amenities create an “address” for people to spend time. Clustering amenities around transit makes urban living more convenient and community oriented. Urban parks provide a respite from the City, and add character and identity to urban neighborhoods. *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. AFTER AFTER BEFORE BEFORE
  10. 10. 10 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 STREETSTHAT WILL BENEFIT FROMTHIS APPROACH: STREETS FOR PEOPLE AUTO EMPHASIS STREET: CHARLESTON TOWARD S 13TH STREET TRANSIT EMPHASIS STREET: S MARYLAND PKWY TOWARD E BONNEVILLE PEDESTRIAN EMPHASIS STREET: FREMONT STREET TOWARD S 11TH STREETBICYCLE EMPHASIS STREET: S MAIN STREET TOWARD W CALIFORNIA AVE. Downtown Las Vegas, with its small blocks and pedestrian scale, has the opportunity to optimize the way people move around. Expanding transit network, improved highway access, and complete streets in sum create a new experience. LAYERED STREET CONCEPT TRANSIT SYSTEM CONCEPT 80 12’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 2’ 11’ 11’ 12’ 92’ 6’ 6’ 6’ 11’ 11’ 12’ 11’ 11’ 6’ 6’ 6’ 92’ 80 8’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 8’ 60’ 6’ 6’ 6’ 6’ 11’ 11’ 8’ 6’ 60’ BIKE EMPHASIZED STREET: S MAIN STREET TOWARD W CALIFORNIA AVE. 81 5 MOBILITY & INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS 2035 FINAL REPORT | 10’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 3’ 11’ 11’ 10’ 89’ 10’ 11’ 11’ 12’6” 12’6” 11’ 11’ 10’ 89’ 83 5 MOBILITY & INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS 2035 FINAL REPORT | 3 6’ 6’ 11’ 11” 11” 6’ 6’ 57’ 12’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 12’ 57’ Charleston will emphasize throughput of cars and service vehicles with coordinated signals while improving pedestrian and bicycle safety with on-street parking and widened sidewalks with trees. S. Main Street will emphasize bike, transit, pedestrian as well as local automobile traffic, with the intent of creating a more appealing and comfortable experience for a wide variety of activities. Improvements of Fremont Street focus mostly on sidewalks, tree canopy, and other pedestrian amenities that encourage walking. S. Maryland Parkway will convert some automobile travel lanes to dedicated LRT transit lanes as well as widen sidewalks to promote pedestrian activity. SECTION CUT SECTION CUT SECTION CUT SECTION CUT *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 77 5 3 6 4 5 EXPAND SIDEWALK W/ STREET FURNITURE EXPAND SIDEWALK W/ STREET FURNITURE EXPAND SIDEWALK W/ STREET FURNITURE PARKING LANE W/ SMART METER CONSISTENT PLANTING OF CANOPY TREES CONSISTENT PLANTING OF CANOPY TREES BIKE SHARROW CONSISTENT PLANTING OF CANOPY TREES BIKE SHARROW TWO-WAY BIKE LANE PAINTED BUFFER TRAVEL LANE TRAVEL LANE PAINTED BUFFER TRAVEL LANE LIGHT RAIL STATION & ALIGNMENT PAINTED BUFFER ONE-WAY TRAVEL LANE MEDIUM IMPROVEMENT TURNING ISLAND SIGNAL IMPROVEMENT CONSISTENT PLANTING OF CANOPY TREES ACTIVE GROUND FLOOR USES W/ OUTDOOR SEATING PARKLET & BIKE CORRAL XERISCAPE PLANTS 1 2 53 4 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 1 2 3 4 6 5 7 Streets need to be prioritized to emphasize one mode over another. This will allow more efficient movement patterns while improving safety and expanding mobility choice. Proposed street patterns are described below. Expanded transit systems provide a variety of options not currently available such as expanded BRT and new LRT services. These new systems will widen mobility choice, and improve safety. BEFORE BEFORE BEFORE BEFORE AFTER AFTER AFTER AFTER
  11. 11. 11 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 A GREENER DOWNTOWN Downtown Las Vegas has nearly the lowest percentage of open space of any major metro in North America! Parks and play areas promote activity, and green streets reduce ambient temperature. OPEN SPACE & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES CONCEPT BENEFITS: TYPES OF OPEN SPACE CENTRAL PARK A central park can provide a key missing gathering place that will act as a regional destination for major events, weekly market days, places to rest and read a book or kick a soccer ball. 24 AC, 200% INCREASE OF NEW PARKS & PLAZAS 30 LINEAL MILES, 300% INCREASE OF NEW URBAN TRAILS OVERALL INCREASE OF OPEN SPACE WITHIN DOWNTOWN TO 6% OF LAND AREA COMMUNITY / REGIONAL PARK These are large-scale public parks serve residents in a broader region. New proposed parks include a Community Sports Park and a Sculpture Park located on the vacant parcels or underutilized properties along UPRR track. NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS & LINEAR PARK 8-9 neighborhood parks associated with transit hubs serve nearby residents and workers. New 3rd St. Linear Park with a consistent tree canopy and designated bike lanes is converted from on-street parking & a travel lane within the current street right-of-way. POCKET PARKS / MINI PLAZAS Several proposed urban plazas/mini parks are converted from vacant and underutilized properties within the densely populated Downtown core. GREEN STREETS OFF-STREET TRAIL (ALONG UPRR TRACK) Green streets are the arteries of the city, and need to accommodate a wider variety of ways to move around. Tree canopy provides shade, encourages walking, outdoor dining, reduces glare and lowers the ambient temperature. A walking and bike path along the railroad right of way will provide a much needed connection between Downtown and the Strip, as well as provide a much needed green recreational buffer along Symphony Park frontage and the Central Business District. *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only.
  12. 12. 12 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 CIVIC & BUSINESS DISTRICT A DOWNTOWN CORE AND MORE. SITE ANALYSIS LOOKING FROM THE SYMPHONY BRIDGE The Downtown core remains one of the primary employment centers of the region. The courthouses, legal and other professional services that cluster in the core create a significant critical mass of daytime activities that can be made more vital and interesting by providing much needed support amenities, additional commercial and residential development, and better connectivity. Vacant parcels and blighted properties especially around City Hall and the RTC provide great potential sites for mixed use buildings, predominantly work force housing, and office with retail. A new vocational school offering programs in digital imaging, high tech manufacturing, service training, and other support educational programs would be a vital addition. Retail elements should include a major downtown grocery, restaurants, and other services. More connections will be important to the future transformation of the district. Expansion of the transit system will include multimodal hubs providing much needed options for travel throughout Downtown. Linkages along and over the Railroad ROW will better connect Symphony Park and the new bridge will provide an iconic landmark that will attract development. The Railroad ROW could be transformed into a community sports park and sculpture garden with a linear hike / bike trail. The Third Street linear park is imagined as a green walkable corridor linking Downtown and the arts district. The 2 acre DLV Event Center could be transformed into a “Central Park” that retains its functionality as a major entertainment venue, but can be made more flexible and programmable as a community gathering space. For example, a portion of the space could be made into a grassy lawn with temporary seating and canopy shade that would be more useful as a passive open space for residents and workers in the area during weekdays and non- event times. DEVELOPMENT NEEDS Development Standards and Guidelines, Key Partnerships (DLV, Railroad, and RTC) CATALYTIC PROJECTS Multimodal Transit (Central Park and RTC Station), Bridge over Railroad ROW, Sports/Community/Sculpture Park and Trail along Railroad ROW, 3rd Street Greenway, “Central Park” Conversion/Renovation, Wayfinding and Streetscape, Bike Share TOTAL GLA • Residential: 1,022,500 GSF / 968 DU’s (Live/Work, Mid-rise/High-rise Workforce Housing) • Hotel: 207,000 GSF (200-room Business Hotel) • Retail: 200,000 GSF (Bars, F+B, Grocery, Movie Theater) • Office: 1,196,000 GSF (Class-A, Professional, Creative Office) • Institutional: 76,000 GSF (Vocational School) • Open Space: 653,000 GSF (Community Garden, Sports Park, 3rd Street Linear Park, Pocket Parks) PROPOSAL LOOKING FROM THE SYMPHONY BRIDGE CITY HALLJUHLJTC BTC NEW PORT ICE HOUSE COUNTY GOV. CTR. CASINO CTR BLVD MAIN ST U PRR R.O .W LARGE SURFACE PARKING LOT - POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE VACANT PARCEL POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE DISTRICTING CONCEPT + PROPOSED PROGRAMS MIXED USETRANSIT HUB CIVIC CORE PROGRAMS: • BTC + Bike Station • High-rise Residential Condos • Live-work Lofts • Service Apartments • Anchored Theater • Urban Format Grocery + Pharmacy • Linear Park • Convenience Retail • Food & Beverage PROGRAMS: • City Hall + Gov. Facility • Class-A Office • Vocational School • Business Hotel • Event Plaza • Cafe & Convenience Retail OFFICE & RETAIL CORRIDOR OFFICE & RETAIL CORRIDOR PROGRAMS: • Professional Offices • Class A Offices • Retail & Restaurants • Public / Semi-Public Facilities • Streetscape improvement INNOVATIVE CORRIDOR COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER AMENITY BELT AMENITY BELT PROGRAMS: • Tech Headquarters • Research Incubators • Collaborative Spaces • Community Sports Park • Sculpture Park • Bike Trail PROGRAMS: • County Gov. Ctr. • Amphitheater • Bike & Pedestrian Bridge PROGRAMS: • Cafe, F&B • Creative Studios • Fitness Club • Art Galleries • Community Garden • Urban Plaza & Pocket Park 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LAND USE GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) RESIDENTIAL 1,022,500 (Dwelling Units) 968 COMMERCIAL 407,000 RETAIL 200,000 HOSPITALITY 207,000 EMPLOYMENT 1,535,000 CLASS A OFFICE 1,196,000 R&D INCUBATOR 339,000 CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL 76,000 INSTITUTIONAL 76,000 TOTAL BLDG AREA (GSF) 3,040,500 OPEN SPACE NEW PARKS 16 (AC) ND PARK, COMM PARK, COMM 15 LINEAR PARK 1 GREEN STREETS 7.9 (MI) CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT LAND USE MIX RESID 34% COMM 13% EMPL 50% INSTI 3% *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. Provide ample community amenities on the ground floors of mixed-use projects to create a urban life style Expand the bicycle network and promote a bike share program Create an enriched environment through crosswalk/streetscape enhancements, public art, and signage Infill and redevelopment of vacant parcels and blighted properties around the City Hall & the BTC to add density to the core and provide housing/office spaces Build a vocational school on the current surface parking lot with a pedestrian linkage to the Symphony Bridge Transform the large vacant parcel along the track into a community sports park and sculpture park to enhance the adjacent property values Build 3rd St. Linear Park as an activity corridor linking the Central Park and 18B Arts District providing a shaded outdoor space Infill urban plazas, pocket parks, and community gardens to provide a variety of outdoor gathering spaces CIVIC CORE MIXED USETRANSIT HUB COUNTY GOV. CTR. INNOVATIVE CORRIDOR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 CITY HALL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY + YIELDS STRATEGY SUMMARY CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT YIELDS
  13. 13. 13 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 18B ARTS DISTRICT POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE THE ARTS FACTORY THE PAINT BRUSH MAKERS & FINDERS LOCAL STORES, ART GALLERIES VELVETEEN RABBIT CASINO CTR BLVD MAINST CHARLESTON BLVD SITE ANALYSIS LOOKING FROM THE ARTS FACTORY MIXED USETRANSIT HUB ARTIST VILLAGE “MAKER”VILLAGE “MAKER”VILLAGE SENIOR VILLAGE MAIN ST. COMM. STRIP MAIN ST. COMM. STRIP SENIOR VILLAGE PROGRAMS: • Transit Station + Plaza • Contemporary Art Ctr. • YMCA • Outdoor Recreation • Student Housing • Preschool • Convenience Retail • Mid/High Rise Residential Condos PROGRAMS: • Live/Work Space • Artist Lofts • Cafe • Gallery Spaces • Outdoor Gathering Spaces UNIVERSITY VILLAGE UNIVERSITY VILLAGE PROGRAMS: • UNLV Student Ctr • School of Sustainability • Robotics + Aerospace Engineering • Design + Fine Art • Business + Gaming • Hospitality • Filming PROGRAMS: • Community Garden • Collaborative Spaces • Work Shops • Incubator Spaces PROGRAMS: • Veteran Housing • SRO/Temp Housing • Senior Housing • Community Center PROGRAMS: • Bars & Restaurants • Home Furniture • Antique • Local Stores MIXED USETRANSIT HUB ARTIST VILLAGE Increase the number of parks and create multi-use outdoor gathering spaces Create sub-districts to attract a more diverse creative working class and diversify the economy Infill mid/high-rise condos around the transit station to increase density Create a transit plaza to promote mixed-use surrounding the station Promote active uses on the ground floor surrounding the plaza Maintain and enhance existing F&B, galleries, and local stores along Main St. Enhance the streetscape & crosswalk on Charleston, Main & Casino Ctr Blvd Expand the bicycle network to Improve the overall biking experience 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 3 4 7 8 4 5 6 2 LAND USE GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) RESIDENTIAL 1,314,000 (Dwelling Units) 1,172 COMMERCIAL 80,000 RETAIL 80,000 EMPLOYMENT 321,500 CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL 676,000 INSTITUTIONAL 462,000 K-12 EDUCATION 214,000 TOTAL BLDG AREA (GSF) 2,391,500 OPEN SPACE NEW PARKS 4.9 (AC) GREEN STREETS 2.9 (LN MI) CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT LAND USE MIX RESID 55% COMM 3% EMPL 14% INSTI 28% A REGIONAL SHOWCASE FORTHE ARTS AND A COMMUNITY OF DIVERSITY. The Arts District is the creative heart of the city. The local stores, art galleries, and artists in residence are compelling and memorable elements of Downtown. However, their impact is limited in scale. Using the underutilized and raw land especially along Casino Center, 3rd Street and Las Vegas Blvd., smart investments could promote walkability, safety, and sustainability, a more critical mass of artists and art related services that amplify the artists “brand” in the district, while providing much needed affordable housing and services for the community. Development protections and improved services could strengthen existing corridors of creative uses, especially along Main and Charleston. New clusters of development can create places that encourage “makers” of all interests including artists, students, food producers, designers, and entrepreneurs. Mixtures of uses around transit, artist oriented housing and creative spaces that adjoin it, a university village that promotes study of the arts and humanities, a “maker” village that attracts entrepreneurs, and senior and veterans housing that cares for the community at large. PROPOSAL LOOKING FROM THE ARTS FACTORY *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. DEVELOPMENT NEEDS District Land Assembly, Coordinated Infrastructure Investment, Development Standards and Guidelines, Forming Key Partnerships (UNLV, Arts Community, and Transit Authority) CATALYTIC PROJECTS Multi-modal Transit (Arts District LRT station), Charleston Complete Streetscape, Museum of Contemporary Art, Artists Green and Demonstration Garden, Local Art Gallery and Makers Village, K-12 School of the Arts, Bike Share TOTAL GLA • Residential: 1,314,000 GSF / 1,172 Housing Units (Live Work Lofts, Mid-rise/ High-rise Condos, Veterans Housing, Student Housing, Temporary Housing) • Retail: 80,000 GSF (Food and Beverage, Services) • Office: 321,500 GSF (Creative Office, Incubator Space) • Civic and Institutional: 676,000 GSF (Art Museum, YMCA, Student Center, Classrooms, K-12 school) • Open Space: 212,000 GSF (Creative Green, Event space, Student Quad, Transit Plaza) STRATEGY SUMMARY CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT YIELDS DISTRICTING CONCEPT + PROPOSED PROGRAMS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY + YIELDS
  14. 14. 14 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 SYMPHONY PARK DISTRICT A CULTURAL AND LIVING DISTRICT BETTER CONNECTEDTO DOWNTOWN. SITE ANALYSIS LOOKING TOWARD THE SYMPHONY PARK Symphony Park has had success in creating a brand for itself in terms of culture through the Smith Center and Children’s Museum. Adjacent Development such as the Ruvo Center for Brain Health and the World Market Centers, as well as the Las Vegas Outlet Shops all have levels of success but very little connectivity or shared experiences between them for major portions of the year. A repertory theater and 500 seat performance hall for chamber music, small dance events, etc. as well as a performing arts school for music and dance could create a hub for performance that complements the Smith Center, while amplifying its impact on the community. Significant residential population can act as a buffer to the railroad tracks and support performers who want to live and work in the area. A community eatery could be located here, with indoor/outdoor seating under canopy shade. Apartments, and lofts oriented toward performers and artists, along with amenities such as service retail, and sculpture/ art walk. A mixed use neighborhood; along the north side of Symphony park, could bring high-end housing, in both high and mid-rise formats, with ground floor fine dining and service retail. Other key land use additions that would augment the district include a research and learning hub near the Ruvo center, a hotel and conference center that could fill a niche for business oriented activities and conferences that complement the World Market Center, Downtown Core, and other business activities throughout Downtown Las Vegas. Improved connections across the tracks and along them provide the opportunity for the perception of Symphony Park to become much more closely integrated to the point where it simply becomes an extension of downtown. Expanded transit service and bike friendly streets throughout as well as trails and new bridge connections along and across the rail ROW would cumulatively change the perception of the “disconnectedness” of Symphony Park by allowing much more easy flow to and from the rest of Downtown and improve mobility. PROPOSAL LOOKING TOWARD THE SYMPHONY PARK *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. DEVELOPMENT NEEDS Development Standards and Guidelines, Forming Key Partnerships (Mixed-use Developer, Arts Agencies) CATALYTIC PROJECTS Multimodal Transit (Symphony Park Station), Bridge over Railroad ROW, Business and Conference Center, 3 Performance Venues with Pedestrian Promenade, Restaurant Kiosks, Wayfinding and Streetscape, Bike Share TOTAL GLA • Residential: 1,438,500 GSF / 1,607 Housing Units (Luxury Apartments, Townhomes, Lofts, Student Housing) • Hotel: 308,000 GSF (Boutique Hotel & Convention Hotel) • Retail: 167,500 GSF (Bars, Restaurants, Service Retail) • Office: 158,000 GSF (Tech Office, Lab Spaces) • Civic & Institutional: 257,500 GSF (Music School and Conference Center) • Open Space: 10,000 GSF (Pocket Park) SYMPHONY PARK FUTURE SYMPHONY PARK BRIDGE THE SMITH CTR. WORLD MARKET CTR. LARGE SURFACE PARKING LOT - POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE SURFACE PARKING LOT - POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE VACANT PARCEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Close the south side pathway of the Symphony Park to create a permanent shaded outdoor activity space for accommodating programmed events Create a “Hub for Performance“ via building a performing arts school for music and dance, as well as a repertory theater, both serving as complements to the Smith Center Infill diverse housing products; bring in workforce, lofts, and high-end housing with ground floor fine dining and service retail Enhance the walking and biking environment in the district, focusing on tree canopy, street furniture, sidewalk, crosswalk, bike lanes and amenities, etc. Encourage active uses on the ground floors of the residential/office/hotel projects providing diverse community services as well as creating an appeal streetscape Promote flexibility in public/semi-public space design, creating small plazas / courtyards for outdoor social gathering Expand the bicycle network and promote a bike share program RESEARCH & LEARNING DISTRICT MIXED NEIGHBORHOOD CONFERENCE DISTRICT THEATER DISTRICT THE SMITH CENTER & CHILDREN MUSEUM SYMPHONY PARK RAILROAD WALK LOFTS RAILROAD WALK LOFTS RAILROAD WALK LOFTS PROGRAMS: • School of Music & Dance • Student Housing • Boutique Hotel • Medical R&D / Lab PROGRAMS: • Luxury Housing • Apartments • Townhomes • Ground Floor Dining and Services • Amenity Roof PROGRAMS: • Business Hotel • Convention Center • Programmed Conference and Events • Ground floor dining and retail PROGRAMS: • Repertory Theater • Shaded outdoor dinning area • Public Arts PROGRAMS: • The Smith Center • Children Museum • Outdoor gathering space PROGRAMS: • Public Arts • Programmed Events & festivals PROGRAMS: • Workforce housing • Live/work Lofts • Community amenities • Gathering courtyard 1 1 2 3 5 3 5 6 7 7 MIXED NEIGHBORHOOD THEATER DISTRICT CONFERENCE DISTRICT SYMPHONY PARK RESEARCH & LEARNING DISTRICT THE SMITH CENTER & CHILDREN MUSEUM STRATEGY SUMMARY CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT YIELDS LAND USE GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) RESIDENTIAL 1,438,500 (Dwelling Units) 1,607 COMMERCIAL 475,500 RETAIL 167,500 HOSPITALITY 308,000 EMPLOYMENT 158,000 CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL 257,500 CIVIC 217,500 INSTITUTIONAL 40,000 TOTAL BLDG AREA (GSF) 2,329,500 OPEN SPACE NEW PARKS 0.2 (AC) GREEN STREETS 1.7 (LN MI) CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT LAND USE MIX RESID 62% COMM 20% EMPL 7% CIVIC & INSIT 11% THE SMITH CENTER SYMPHONY PARK DISTRICTING CONCEPT + PROPOSED PROGRAMS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY + YIELDS
  15. 15. 15 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 CASHMAN DISTRICT A COMMUNITY OF ENTREPRENEURS ANCHORED BY SPORTS,AND CULTURE. PROPOSAL LOOKING FROM MARYLAND / WASHINGTON INTERSECTION SITE ANALYSIS LOOKING FROM MARYLAND / WASHINGTON INTERSECTION The Cashman District has traditionally been the home of historical and cultural assets of the city, the home of the Triple A baseball club, and a significant hub of government employment. However, it’s suffered from a lack of resident population and enough programming to consistently interest the community at large. There is tremendous potential to create a new mixed community that provides a sports and entertainment core of activity based upon building a soccer stadium and associated facilities that attract an MLS franchise. Connected to this facility would be a number of mixed use blocks that include workforce housing and creative and incubator office space that caters to the high tech uses such as Zappos employees, UAV researchers, and other creatives looking for cool, hip and affordable places to live and work. A transit plaza with a light rail stop or BRT service, bike share, a town green and other support amenities would provide a knuckle of activity that acts as a gateway into the district from Las Vegas Blvd. Clustered around the plaza would be a portion of creative office and incubator spaces for research and development. Ground floor bars and restaurants as well as service retail would complement game day activities as well as support a significant residential population. Event programming will be an important added dimension to the area. Events beyond MLS soccer could include farmers markets, swap meets, food and beverage events, concerts, fun runs, and local community based activities. Local museums and cultural destinations including the Natural History Museum, the Library, Neon Boneyard, Old Mormon Fort, and others could take advantage of fundraisers, and other activities with a tie-in with the village green and stadium related activities. STADIUM DISTRICT MIXED RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT MIXED RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT TRANSIT-ORIENTED CORRIDOR MIXED USE STATION DISTRICT MODERATE DENSITY RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT PROGRAMS: • Soccer Stadium • Parking Structure • Retail • Food & Beverage • Bars • Green Lawn PROGRAMS: • Condos • Apartments • Duplex • Townhomes • Convenience Retail • Food & Beverage PROGRAMS: • Apartment • Convenience Store • Sidewalk & Street Trees PROGRAMS: • Creative Office • Live/Work • Cafe & Retail • Bars & Restaurants • Bike Share PROGRAMS: • Townhomes • Parking *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. DEVELOPMENT NEEDS Development standards and Guidelines, Key Partnerships (DLV, Railroad, and RTC) CATALYTIC PROJECTS Multimodal Transit (Central Park and RTC Station), Bridge over Railroad ROW, Sports/Community/Sculpture Park and Trail along Railroad ROW, 3rd Street Greenway, “Central Park” Conversion/Renovation, Wayfinding and Streetscape, Bike Share TOTAL GLA • Residential: 1,004,000 GSF / 1,004 Housing Units (Combination of Townhomes, Apartments, Condos, Duplexes, SFR) • Retail: 102,000 GSF (Bars, Restaurants, Sports Bar, Service Retail) • Office: 294,000 GSF (Above-shops around Transit Hub) • Institutional: 150,000 GSF (Soccer Stadium) • Open Space: 80,000 GSF (Town Green) OLD MORMON FORT LV LIBRARY WASHINGTON AVE NEON MUSEUM POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE STADIUM DISTRICT TRANSIT-ORIENTED CORRIDOR MIXED USE STATION DISTRICT MODERATE DENSITY RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT 1 2 3 4 5 6 Bring in the light rail station with a bike share center directly to the front of the Stadium; create a transit plaza with a variety of activities Build a soccer stadium and associated facilities that attract an MLS franchise to revitalize the area Infill diverse housing products (single family homes, townhomes, duplexes, workforce housing units,etc.) to draw population and bring added density to the area Build a mixed-use station district providing creative & incubator offices and ground floor bars and restaurants that cater to the tech population and gameday visitors Incorporate a versatile town green for tailgating, diverse programmed events, festivals, and community based activities Create a greenway network; expand the bike network and promote a bike share program encouraging public health 1 2 3 4 5 6 CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT LAND USE MIX RESID 65% COMM 6% EMPL 19% INSTI 10% LAND USE GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) RESIDENTIAL 1,004,000 (Dwelling Units) 1004 COMMERCIAL 102,000 RETAIL 102,000 EMPLOYMENT 294,000 CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL 150,000 INSTITUTIONAL 150,000 TOTAL BLDG AREA (GSF) 1,550,000 OPEN SPACE NEW PARKS 1.8 (AC) GREEN STREETS 5.2 (LN MI) STRATEGY SUMMARY CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT YIELDS DISTRICTING CONCEPT + PROPOSED PROGRAMS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY + YIELDS
  16. 16. 16 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 FREMONT EAST DISTRICT SITE ANALYSIS LOOKING FROM MARYLAND / CARSON INTERSECTION PROPOSAL LOOKING FROM MARYLAND / CARSON INTERSECTION IMPROVED AFFORDABILITY, SAFETY AND AMENITY. STRATEGY SUMMARY Fremont East is an existing neighborhood that has gained popularity due to its proximity in Downtown, and its relatively strong housing stock. With additional residents and shops demanding more pedestrian connections, it will be important to create a “layered” street pattern, allowing for the accommodation of light rail (along Carson Avenue), bicycle routes along Maryland and 9th Streets, while retaining Stewart and Bridger as more auto oriented streets. A central community green space with services and amenities such as a community center and play areas for families could provide a much needed activity hub. Clustered mixed use including multifamily housing and services that could provide much needed affordability and pedestrian activity. Expanded services could include a small grocery store and community center, police substation, post office, and daycare facility, all clustered near the community green. Neighborhood conservation areas to the south of the mixed use core are important to preserve historic housing stock, tools such as design standards and incentives for rehabilitation and code enforcement will help. Northward, a 3-block redevelopment area could support new residential dedicated development, including townhouses, and transitional housing for families. To the east, generational housing could provide much needed senior units and additional services. RESIDENTIAL CONSERVATION AREA MIXED RESIDENTIAL - HIGH DENSITY LOW-MODERATE DENSITY RESIDENTIAL MIXED RESIDENTIAL - MODERATE DENSITYMIXED RESIDENTIAL - MODERATE DENSITY MIXED RESIDENTIAL - HIGH DENSITY LOW-MODERATE DENSITY RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS: • Stabilizing Neighborhoods • Pocket Parks • Sidewalk & Street Trees • Townhomes • Community Garden PROGRAMS: • Condos • Live-work Lofts • Townhomes • Roof Amenities • Convenience Retail PROGRAMS: • Townhomes • Temporary Housing • Healthcare Clinic • “One-stop-shop” Service PROGRAMS: • Condos • Apartments • Roof Amenities • Convenience Retail • Corner Restaurant • Daily Service NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CORE PROGRAMS: • Transit Station • Grocery Store • Convenience Retail • Community Center • Occupational School • Restaurants • Post Office • Police Substation • Parking Garage • Neighborhood Park NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CORE *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. DEVELOPMENT NEEDS Development Standards and Guidelines, Key Partnerships (Residential Housing Developers) CATALYTIC PROJECTS Multimodal Transit (Fremont East Station), Community Green, Design Standards and Code Enforcement, Community Center, Urban Format Grocery Store, Layered Street Network, Wayfinding and Streetscape, Bike Share TOTAL GLA • Residential: 1,297,000 GSF / 1,060 DU’s (Live/Work, Mid-rise/High-rise Workforce Housing) • Retail: 75,000 GSF (F+B, Service Retail, Small Urban Grocery) • Civic/Institutional: 60,000 GSF (Clinic, Senior Center, Community Center, Continuing Education) • Open Space: 12,000 GSF (Community Green) CONTAINER PARK OGDEN EL CORTEZ NEWTOWNHOUSE PROJECT POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE - POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE VACANT PARCEL - POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE MARYLAND PKW Y 11TH ST CARSON AVE FREMONT ST RESIDENTIAL CONSERVATION AREA 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Redevelop the large underutilized surface parking lot, as well as declined motels along Fremont St; infill diverse housing products to attract population Create a “Neighborhood Service Core” associated with the transit station, providing a neighborhood green along with diverse community amenities and resources Conserve the existing neighborhoods in the vicinity and maintain their current characteristics; infill with low-rise homes and pocket parks Redevelop a block by accommodating temporary housing needs associated with a new medical clinic and other much needed services for the street population Improve Carson Ave as a transit-emphasis street with a designated transit lane, enhanced crosswalk and widened sidewalks Improve the Fremont St. pedestrian environment, focusing on active ground floor uses, tree canopy, sidewalks, and street amenities that encourage walking Expand the bike network and promote a bike share program for promoting public health 1 2 6 7 4 3 3 5 CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT YIELDS LAND USE GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) RESIDENTIAL 1,297,000 (Dwelling Units) 1,060 COMMERCIAL 75,000 RETAIL 75,000 CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL 60,000 CIVIC 43,000 INSTITUTIONAL 17,000 TOTAL BLDG AREA (GSF) 1,432,000 OPEN SPACE NEW PARKS 0.6 (AC) GREEN STREETS 5.1 (LN MI) CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT LAND USE MIX CIVIC & INSIT, 4% COMM 5% RESID 91% DISTRICTING CONCEPT + PROPOSED PROGRAMS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY + YIELDS
  17. 17. 17 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 FOUNDERS DISTRICT SITE ANALYSIS LOOKING FROM CHARLESTON / MARYLAND INTERSECTION A HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD OF DOWNTOWN AUGMENTEDWITHTRANSIT. PROPOSAL LOOKING FROM CHARLESTON / MARYLAND INTERSECTION The Founders district is one of the most well preserved residential neighborhoods in the region. The Huntridge theater and circle park are remarkable examples of early Las Vegas architecture and urban design. Many of the houses, streets, and landscape features of this area are particularly notable examples of classic inner ring American urban design. What is lacking are strong development controls, including an audit of contributing historic buildings, design standards, and code enforcement, which can preserve the character of the area, while helping to anticipate and mitigate the impacts of planning initiatives already underway. The integration of multimodal transit in this area will be a game changer. A transit station at the northern portion of Huntridge Circle Park will create a hub of energy that will attract mixed use development. Many properties are underutilized, auto oriented and blighted along Maryland Parkway and Charleston Blvd, and present significant opportunities for corridor redevelopment that includes mixed use residential and creative office space over ground floor retail and community oriented amenity spaces. The transit station itself needs to be designed to accommodate services appropriate for the area. A quick serve café, convenience store, ticket booth, bike share, trail connections, wayfinding signage, and rest rooms are all appropriate amenities for the station area itself. A health club and a small local grocer will support the local community as well. The type and character of mixed use development, if done correctly in this area, could add a new dimension to the neighborhood while improving affordability, amenity, and overall quality of life for residents. Moderate density residential, both for sale and rental, with ground floor amenities especially at key intersections could create an attractive live/work/shop atmosphere. Restaurants and cafes and live/work units that engage the street will promote pedestrian activity. COMMERCIAL STRIP COMMERCIAL STRIP HUNTRIDGE PARK NEIGHBORHOOD HUNTRIDGE PARK NEIGHBORHOOD MIXED RESIDENTIAL MIXED RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS: • Professional Office • Convenience Retail PROGRAMS: • Neighborhoods Stabilization • Community Garden • Playground • Community-oriented Events Programming PROGRAMS: • Live/Work Lofts • Affordable housing • Green Roof • Community Amenities & Services • Shared-use Parking • Pocket Plaza MIXED USETRANSIT HUB PROGRAMS: • Condos • Class-A Office • Small Grocery • Convenience Retail • Community Theatre • Daily Service • Community Amenities • Enhanced Crosswalk DEVELOPMENT NEEDS Development Standards and Guidelines, Key Partnerships (Mixed Use Housing Developers) CATALYTIC PROJECTS Multimodal Transit (Founders Station), Community Grocery, Wayfinding and Streetscape, Bike Share TOTAL GLA • Residential: 813,500 GSF / 660 DU’s (Live/Work, Mid-rise/High-rise Workforce Housing) • Retail: 75,000 GSF (F+B, Service Retail, Small Urban Grocery) • Office: 147,500 GSF (Creative Office) • Civic/Institutional: 25,000 GSF (Clinic, Community Center) • Open Space: 14,500 GSF (Community Garden) HUNTRIDGE CIRCLE PARK HISTORIC HUNTRIDGE THEATER POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE POTENTIAL REDEVELOPMENT SITE MARYLAND PKW Y CHARLESTON BLVD LAND USE GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) RESIDENTIAL 813,500 (Dwelling Units) 660 COMMERCIAL 75,000 EMPLOYMENT 147,500 CIVIC & INSTITUTIONAL 25,000 TOTAL BLDG AREA (GSF) 1,061,000 OPEN SPACE NEW PARKS 0.3 (AC) GREEN STREETS 6.0 (LN MI) CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT LAND USE MIX RESID 77% COMM 7% EMPL 14% CIVIC & INSTI, 2% *Images and proposals are for illustrative purposes only. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Improve the Huntridge Park by providing play fields, community gardens, and programmed community-oriented events; improve the maintenance of the park Preserve the historic Huntridge Theater and renovate it into a community theater to serve the neighborhoods at large while maintaining the community’s historic identity Redevelop the blocks at the Charleston/ Maryland intersection; infill residential/ office mixed-use projects adjacent to the transit station to attract population Enhance the walking and biking environment along Charleston Ave. and Maryland Pkwy., focusing on the tree canopy, street furniture, sidewalks, crosswalks, bike lanes and amenities, etc. Encourage active uses on the ground floors of the residential/office projects to provide diverse community services as well as to create an appeal streetscape Promote flexibility in public/semi-public space design, creating small plazas / courtyards for outdoor social gathering Encourage sustainable design, using PV roofs as well as green roofs to reduce the heat island and create a thermally comfortable environment 1 3 4 4 4 2 6 7 7 7 MIXED USETRANSIT HUB STRATEGY SUMMARY CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT YIELDS DISTRICTING CONCEPT + PROPOSED PROGRAMS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY + YIELDS
  18. 18. 18 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 IMPLEMENTATIONTOOLS STREAMLINED GOVERNANCE ADOPT FORM- BASED CODING OFFER ZONING INCENTIVES (DENSITY BONUS, ETC.) EMPLOY FAST-TRACK PERMITTING / ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW PROCEDURES (60-DAY AVERAGE) DOWNTOWN PLANNING DEPARTMENT (3-4 NEW EMPLOYEES) NEW MUSEUM DOWNTOWN SCHOOL OFTHE ARTS / RESEARCH; PARK SOCCER STADIUM CONVENTION CENTER + BUSINESS HOTEL GROCERY STORE + AMENITY RETAIL FOCUS INCENTIVES ON TRANSIT HUBS OFFER SUITE OF LOCAL INCENTIVES (PROPERTYTAX INCENTIVES, MICRO-LOANS, OFF-SITE IMPROVEMENTS, ETC.) ESTABLISH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CAPITAL FUND GRANT APPLICATION (INNOVATION DISTRICT) LIGHT RAIL SYSTEM & DOWNTOWN CIRCULATOR BIKE SHARE NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS GREEN STREETS + MAJOR PARKS COMPREHENSIVE WAYFINDING SYSTEM UNIVERSITIES + VOTECH MAJOR LEAGUE SPORTS NON PROFITS MIXED USE DEVELOPERS EVENT PROGRAMMERS OVERSEE MANAGEMENT OF DOWNTOWN PARKING COORDINATE BRANDING & MARKETING, AND EVENTS PROGRAMMING BOTH ADVANCE DOWNTOWN- WIDE PRIORITIES WHILE SUPPORT EFFORTS OF INDIVIDUAL DISTRICTS UNDERTAKE MEASURESTO IMPROVE SAFETY & SECURITY HELP FUND DOWNTOWN CIRCULATOR CATALYTIC PROJECTS INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT CREATIVE FINANCIAL INCENTIVES PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT To optimize Downtown’s market, six key implementation strategies associated with detailed tools are identified: ALREADY UNDERWAY* * * * *
  19. 19. 19 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 NEXT STEPS PRESENTATION OF MASTER PLAN CONCEPT AT COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SESSIONS PUBLIC HEARING / PRESENTATION OF FINAL MASTER PLANTO CITY COUNCIL MARCH 9TH 2016 APRIL 12TH 2016 MARCH 23RD 2016 APRIL 1ST 2016 MID-MARCH 2016 NOVEMBER 2015 - MARCH 2016 MAY 18TH 2016 PREFERRED PLAN DEVELOPMENT 2-WEEK PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD ON MASTER PLAN CONCEPT ADMINISTRATIVE DRAFT DOWNTOWN MASTER PLAN DELIVERED FOR STAFF REVIEW PREPARATION OF IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY / REFINEMENT OF MASTER PLAN CONCEPT EXECUTIVE STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING LETS BUILD IT! PUBLIC HEARING / PRESENTATION OF DRAFT MASTER PLANTO PLANNING COMMISSION
  20. 20. 20 DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS MASTER PLAN PUBLIC OUTREACH #4 | PREFERRED PLAN | MARCH 9TH, 2016 WHAT DOYOUTHINK? Please provide us your thoughts about our plan (use sticky notes):

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