Battle area showing the positions of the British Grand Fleet and German High Seas Fleet at 14.00 hours on 31st May 1916. J...
16 battleships 5 battle cruisers 6 pre-dreadnoughts 11 light cruisers 61 torpedo-boats   28 battleships 9 battlecruisers 8...
Pre-dreadnought battleship 1908
HMS Dreadnought (1911)
SMS  Rheinland ,   German Dreadnought
Tirpitz believed Germany’s future dominant role in the world depended on a navy powerful enough to challenge Britain  Admi...
<ul><li>Beatty sights Hipper's leading battlecruisers.  </li></ul><ul><li>Hipper turns towards the South East, hoping to l...
HMS Queen Mary- sunk All but twenty-one of her 1,266 crew were lost
Crew of 1,019 officers and men, leaving only two survivors
Crossing the T  <ul><li>By 18:30 the main battle fleet action was joined for the first time, with Jellicoe effectively &qu...
507 510 2,551 6,097 5 8 4 0 0 3 1 3 1 0 0 0 British Grand  Fleet                                                          ...
“ Admiral Jellicoe is the only commander on either side capable of losing the war in a single afternoon.&quot;  Winston Ch...
&quot;Nevertheless, there can be no doubt that even the most successful outcome of a further battle will not force England...
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Jutland3

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The Battle of Jutland was the culmination of a naval arms race between Germany and Great Britain. In the end it failed to challenge Britain's supremacy of the seas and kept in place the blockade further crippling the German war effort.

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  • The British Grand Fleet steamed eastwards across the North Sea in two groups - the battlecruiser fleet commanded by Admiral Sir David Beatty from its base in Rosyth, and the main battle fleet under Admiral Sir John Jellicoe, from its base at Scapa Flow. The German High Seas Fleet moved northwards from Wilhelmshaven in a similar formation, with Admiral Franz Hipper’s faster battlecruisers steaming ahead of the main battle fleet under Admiral Reinhard Scheer. By early morning of 31st May 1916, the British and German fleets were on a collision course but incredibly, neither knew that the other was at sea. Scheer was unaware that his signals were being intercepted, whilst Jellicoe and Beatty were mistakenly informed by the Admiralty at midday that Scheer was still in harbour at Wilhelmshaven. Consequently, when visual contact was made by the advance battlecruisers of Beatty and Hipper at 14.40, this came as a surprise to both sides.
  • It included seventeen modern dreadnoughts , five battle cruisers , twenty-five cruisers and twenty pre-dreadnought battleships as well as over forty submarines
  • Beatty sights Hipper&apos;s leading battlecruisers. Hipper turns towards the South East, hoping to lure Beatty in the direction of Scheer&apos;s main battle fleet which is 50 miles to the South and rapidly closing. At this point, Scheer and Hipper must have thought that their plan of detaching Beatty from the British Grand Fleet was working.
  • Destruction of the German High Seas Fleet would not harm Germany’s war effort in the slightest, whilst defeat – unlikely, but possible - would cause Britain to lose the war.
  • Jutland3

    1. 1. Battle area showing the positions of the British Grand Fleet and German High Seas Fleet at 14.00 hours on 31st May 1916. Jutland Peninsula An attempt to remove the blockade strangling Germany
    2. 2. 16 battleships 5 battle cruisers 6 pre-dreadnoughts 11 light cruisers 61 torpedo-boats 28 battleships 9 battlecruisers 8 armored cruisers 26 light cruisers 78 destroyers 1 minelayer 1 sea plane carrier Battle of Jutland- The victory of the war hung in the balance VS
    3. 3. Pre-dreadnought battleship 1908
    4. 4. HMS Dreadnought (1911)
    5. 5. SMS  Rheinland , German Dreadnought
    6. 6. Tirpitz believed Germany’s future dominant role in the world depended on a navy powerful enough to challenge Britain Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz
    7. 7. <ul><li>Beatty sights Hipper's leading battlecruisers. </li></ul><ul><li>Hipper turns towards the South East, hoping to lure Beatty in the direction of Scheer's main battle fleet </li></ul><ul><li>. At this point, Scheer and Hipper must have thought that their plan of detaching Beatty from the British Grand Fleet was working. </li></ul>
    8. 8. HMS Queen Mary- sunk All but twenty-one of her 1,266 crew were lost
    9. 9. Crew of 1,019 officers and men, leaving only two survivors
    10. 10. Crossing the T <ul><li>By 18:30 the main battle fleet action was joined for the first time, with Jellicoe effectively &quot;crossing Scheer's T&quot;. </li></ul><ul><li>The officers on the lead German battleships, and Scheer himself, were taken completely by surprise when they emerged from drifting clouds of smoke & mist to suddenly find themselves facing the massed firepower of the entire Grand Fleet main battle line, which they did not know was even at sea. </li></ul>
    11. 11. 507 510 2,551 6,097 5 8 4 0 0 3 1 3 1 0 0 0 British Grand Fleet                                                                                                                     Losses German High Seas Fleet Dreadnoughts Pre-Dreadnoughts Battlecruisers Armoured Cruisers Light Cruisers Destroyers Personnel - killed Personnel - wounded
    12. 12. “ Admiral Jellicoe is the only commander on either side capable of losing the war in a single afternoon.&quot; Winston Churchill First Sea Lord Destruction of the German High Seas Fleet would not harm Germany’s war effort in the slightest, whilst defeat – unlikely, but possible - would cause Britain to lose the war.
    13. 13. &quot;Nevertheless, there can be no doubt that even the most successful outcome of a further battle will not force England to make peace.&quot; Admiral Reinhard Scheer Confidential report on the Battle of Jutland to the Kaiser, 4th July 1916. The German High Seas Fleet remained in port for the rest of the war &quot;The German Fleet has assaulted its jailor, but it is still in jail.“ American newspaper

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