Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Age Of The Political Revolutions

656 views

Published on

Published in: Education, News & Politics
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The Age Of The Political Revolutions

  1. 1. (1776-1848) THE AGE OF THE LIBERAL REVOLUTIONS
  2. 2. Index <ul><li>Introduction: The Liberal Revolutions </li></ul><ul><li>The Independence of the United States of America (1775-1787) </li></ul><ul><li>The French Revolution (1789-1799) </li></ul><ul><li>Bonaparte (1795-1815) </li></ul><ul><li>European Restoration (1815-1848) </li></ul><ul><li>The Revolutions of 1820, 1830 and 1848 </li></ul>
  3. 3. 1. Introduction: The Liberal Revolutions
  4. 4. <ul><li>What? </li></ul>1. Introduction: The Liberal Revolutions When? Who? Why? Political revolution based on the principles of the Liberalism The bourgeoisie In order to change the society, economic and the political situation. 1775-1848 Where? United States, Europe & South America
  5. 5. 2. The Independence of the United States of America (1775-1787) <ul><li>The Road to Independence </li></ul><ul><li>The War of Independence (1775-1783) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Declaration of Independence (1776) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Conflict </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Constitution of the United States (1787) </li></ul>
  6. 6. 2.1 The Road to Independence Britain needed money to pay for war expenses Taxed colonists, restricted settlements and limited self-goverment British taxed colonists on many of the goods coming into the colonies from other places. Sugar & Stamp Acts
  7. 7. 2.1 The Road to Independence
  8. 8. The Thirteen Colonies
  9. 9. 2.2 The War of Independence (1775-1783) <ul><li>September 1774 </li></ul><ul><li>Brought colonists together as Americans </li></ul><ul><li>All delegates agreed that Parliament was exerting too much control. </li></ul><ul><li>It issued a Declaration of Rights protesting Great Britain’s actions. </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed not to import or use British goods </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed to stop exports to Britain </li></ul><ul><li>Formed a force of minutemen, colonial soldiers who would be ready to resist a British attack with short notice </li></ul>The First Continental Congress
  10. 10. The Second Continental Congress 2.2 The War of Independence (1775-1783)
  11. 11. 2.2 The War of Independence (1775-1783): Thomas Paine’s Common Sense <ul><li>A matter of Common Sense </li></ul><ul><li>Early in 1776 Thomas Paine published a pamphlet called Common Sense . </li></ul><ul><li>Condemned monarchy and particularly the rule of George III </li></ul><ul><li>Called for an American declaration of independence, not just a protest against taxes </li></ul><ul><li>The pamphlet sold more than 100,000 copies. It was one of the first American bestsellers. </li></ul>
  12. 12. 2.2 Thomas Paine’s Common Sense
  13. 13. 2.2.1 The Declaration of Independence <ul><li>The Continental Congress organized a committee to write a draft of a declaration of independence. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>John Adams, Robert Livingston, Roger Sherman, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin. Jefferson was chosen to write the draft. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>On July 2, 1776, Congress approved final document and voted to declare independence. </li></ul><ul><li>On July 4, they approved the entire document. </li></ul>
  14. 15. 2.2.1 The Declaration of Independence
  15. 16. 2.2.2 The conflict
  16. 18. 2.3 The Constitution of the United States (1787)
  17. 19. 2.3 The Constitution of the United States (1787)

×