Lithuania
HEOGRAPIYANG PISIKAL
Kinaroroonan
Lithuania ( i
/ˌlɪθuˌˌeɪniə/ or /ˌlɪθjuˌˌeɪniə/;
Lithuanian: Lietuva), officia...
Mga anyong tubig
Rivers: Total of 738 more than 10 kilometers in length
NAME TOTAL
LENGTH
Nemunas 937 km
Neris 510 km
Vent...
MGA INDUSTRIYA
Lithuania Industry is an extensive term
that includes a variety of fields. Industry is
Lithuania does not h...
Transportasyon at Komunikasyon
Railways extend 1,998 km (1,241 mi) across
Lithuania, providing rail access to the Baltic S...
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Lithuania

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Lithuania

  1. 1. Lithuania HEOGRAPIYANG PISIKAL Kinaroroonan Lithuania ( i /ˌlɪθuˌˌeɪniə/ or /ˌlɪθjuˌˌeɪniə/; Lithuanian: Lietuva), officially the Republic of Lithuania (Lithuanian: Lietuvos Respublika) is a country in Northern Europe, the largest of the three Baltic states. It is situated along the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea, to the east of Sweden and Denmark. It borders Latvia to the north, Belarus to the east and south, Poland to the south, and a Russian exclave (Kaliningrad Oblast) to the southwest. Sukat at Hugis Lithuania has an area of 65,200 square kilometers (25,174 square miles) and a total coastline of 99 kilometers (62 miles). Lithuania is a mid-size country by European standards and is about the size of West Virginia. Mga anyong lupa Lithuania's main landforms are the Lithuanian plains and Juozapines Hill (293 m above sea level). There are no high mountains in Lithuania. Smoothed by glacier retreat during the last Ice Age, Lithuania is mostly flat lowlands in the west, with some low hills. In the east and southeast, bogs, numerous small lakes, and the rolling hills of the Baltic Highlands dominate the landscape, where much of the land is covered by dense forest. Its highest point is near the Belarus border where the Juozapine stands at 964 ft. (294m).
  2. 2. Mga anyong tubig Rivers: Total of 738 more than 10 kilometers in length NAME TOTAL LENGTH Nemunas 937 km Neris 510 km Venta 350 km Sesupe 289 km Sventoji 246 km Minija 213 km Nevezis 209 km Lakes: Over 3,000 lakes cover about 1.5% of the total territory. The majority of the lakes are in the eastern portion of the country known as the Eastern Highlands. The largest are: NAME AREA Druksiai 44.8 sq. km Dysnai 24.0 sq. km Dusia 23.3 sq. km Vistytis 17.9 sq. km Luodis 13.2 sq. km Sartai 13.2 sq. km Other Bodies of Water: o Curonian lagoon, a 900 sq. km bay of water separated from the sea by a narrow spir of land known as Curonian spit. 25 rivers outflow into this lagoon, which in turn empties into the Baltic sea through a single narrow (2 km wide) opening at the port of Klaipeda. o Kauno marios, a 63.5 sq. km reservoir formed by a dam across river Nemunas at Pazaisliai.
  3. 3. MGA INDUSTRIYA Lithuania Industry is an extensive term that includes a variety of fields. Industry is Lithuania does not hold a major position in the country's economy as agriculture. Lithuania has an agricultural economy and the Soviet's efforts to change the type of economy into an industrial one were fruitless. Compared to other segments of the economy, Lithuania industry witnessed a steady fall, especially during the 1990s. Employment in the industrial sector of Lithuania decreased in 1990. The major impediments that restricted the growth and development of industries in Lithuania were obsolete equipments, old technologies and dependence on unstable markets. The industries of Lithuania include chemicals, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, oils, textiles, wood and paper processing, electronics etc. Antas ng pagunlad GDP growth: 2,3% Unemployment: 14,2% Inflation: 2,1% GDP (official exchange rate): $43.2 billion (2011 est.) [see also: GDP (official exchange rate) country ranks ] GDP - real growth rate: 6% (2011 est.) country comparison to the world: 50 1.3% (2010 est.) -14.7% (2009 est.) [see also: GDP - real growth rate country ranks ] GDP - per capita: $18,700 (2011 est.) country comparison to the world: 66 $17,600 (2010 est.) $17,100 (2009 est.) note: data are in 2011 US dollars [see also: GDP - per capita country ranks ] GDP - composition by sector: agriculture: 3.2% [see also: GDP - composition by sector - agriculture country ranks ] industry: 28% [see also: GDP - composition by sector - industry country ranks ] services: 68.8% (2011 est.) [see also: GDP - composition by sector - services country ranks ]
  4. 4. Transportasyon at Komunikasyon Railways extend 1,998 km (1,241 mi) across Lithuania, providing rail access to the Baltic Sea for Vilnius, Kaunas, and other major urban areas in 2002. About 44,000 km (27,341 mi) of the 35,500 km (22,059 mi) of highways are hard- surfaced. In 2002 there were 600 km (373 mi) of perennial navigable waterways. Sea routes link Klaipeda on the Baltic Sea with 200 foreign ports; K aunas is the principal inland port. Also in 2002, the merchant fleet consisted of 47 ships (of 1,000 GRT or over) totaling 279,743 GRT, including 25 cargo vessels, 8 combination bulks, 2 oil tankers, 1 railcar carrier, 6 refrigerated cargo, 2 roll-on/roll-off cargo, and 3 short-sea passenger. A railway sea ferry from Klaipeda to Mukran (Germany) began in 1986. There are 72 airports, 9 with paved runways in 2001. Principal airports include Palanga, Vilnius, and Kaunas International at Kaunas, and one commercial airport in Siauliai. Two international airlines serve Lithuania: Lithuanian Airlines and Lietuva. In 2001, 304,100 passengers were carried on scheduled domestic and international airline flights. Lithuania has begun to modernize its telecommunications industry. A law deregulating certain aspects of telecommunications went into effect in January 1992. Private investors now have the right to offer long-distance service to the public, but restrictions on the participation of foreign capital have slowed this type of activity. Both telecommunications and transportation will require large investments to modernize the infrastructure and to reform the enterprises. This sector is plagued with inefficiencies. Neverth eless, Lithuania's telephone service is among the most advanced in the former Soviet republics. There were 240 telephone lines serving 1,000 persons in the early 1990s. International connections exist via satellite from Vilnius through Oslo or from Kaunas through Copenhagen. Lithuania has two television companies and five radio companies. In 1993 some 1.4 million television sets and more than 1.4 million radios were in use, or one per 2.7 persons. Two national radio programs are broadcast by the state-owned Leituvos Radijas ir Televizija. Radio Vilnius broadcasts in Lithuanian and English. There are national, regional, and minority language television programs.

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