Dacota_blue: What is science?

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Introduction to science.

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  • What is Science?Objectives:At the end of the Lesson The Students should be able to: define science as a field of study.Describe the terms of its scope.Cite some examples of scientific development in Science. Values Integration:1. Appreciate the beauty and wonders brought by Science.
  • Motivation:Story telling: The story of Ecarus (a Story of Discovery and failure)Among all those mortals who grew so wise that they learned the secrets of the gods, none was more cunning than Daedalus.He once built, for King Minos of Crete, a wonderful Labyrinth of winding ways so cunningly tangled up and twisted around that, once inside, you could never find your way out again without a magic clue. But the King's favor veered with the wind, and one day he had his master architect imprisoned in a tower. Daedalus managed to escape from his cell; but it seemed impossible to leave the island, since every ship that came or went was well guarded by order of the King.At length, watching the sea gulls in the air the only creatures that were sure of liberty-he thought of a plan for himself and his young son Icarus, who was captive with him.Little by little, he gathered a store of feathers great and small. He fastened these together with thread, molded them in with wax, and so fashioned two great wings like those of a bird. When they were done, Daedalus fitted them to his own shoulders, and after one or two efforts, he found that by waving his arms he could winnow the air and cleave it, as a swimmer does the sea. He held himself aloft, wavered this way and that with the wind, and at last, like a great fledgling, he learned to fly.Without delay, he fell to work on a pair of wings for the boy Icarus and taught him carefully how to use them, bidding him beware of rash adventures among the stars. "Remember," said the father, "never to fly very low or very high, for the fogs about the earth would weigh you down, but the blaze of the sun will surely melt your feathers apart if you go too near."For Icarus, these cautions went in at one ear and out by the other. Who could remember to be careful when he was to fly for the first time? Are birds careful? Not they! And not an idea remained in the boy's head but the one joy of escape.The day came, and the fair wind that was to set them free. The father-bird put on his wings, and, while the light urged them to be gone, he waited to see that all was well with Icarus, for the two could not fly hand in hand. Up they rose, the boy after his father. The hateful ground of Crete sank beneath them; and the country folk, who caught a glimpse of them when they were high above the treetops, took it for a vision of the gods-Apollo, perhaps, with Cupid after him.At first there was a terror in the joy. The wide vacancy of the air dazed them-a glance downward made their brains reel. But when a great wind filled their wings, and Icarus felt himself sustained, like a halcyon bird in the hollow of a wave, like a child uplifted by his mother, he forgot everything in the world but joy. He forgot Crete and the other islands that he had passed over: he saw but vaguely that winged thing in the distance before him that was his father Daedalus. He longed for one draft of flight to quench the thirst of his captivity: he stretched out his arms to the sky and made toward the highest heavens.Alas for him! Warmer and warmer grew the air. Those arms, that had seemed to uphold him, relaxed. His wings wavered, dropped. He fluttered his young hands vainly-he was falling-and in that terror he remembered. The heat of the sun had melted the wax from his wings; the feathers were falling, one by one, like snowflakes; and there was none to help.He fell like a leaf tossed down by the wind, down, down, with one cry that overtook Daedalus far away. When he returned and sought high and low for the poor boy, he saw nothing but the birdlike feathers afloat on the water, and he knew that Icarus was drowned.The nearest island he named Icaria, in memory of the child; but he, in heavy grief, went to the temple of Apollo in Sicily and there hung up his wings as an offering. Never again did he attempt to fly.
  • Motivation:Story telling: The story of Ecarus Among all those mortals who was born wise and learned the secrets of the gods, none was more cunning than Daedalus.He once builta wonderful Labyrinth of winding ways for King Minos of Crete. It was so cunningly tangled up and twisted around that, once inside, you could never find your way out again without a magic clue. But the King's favor veered with the wind, and one day he had his master architect imprisoned in a tower. Daedalus managed to escape from his cell; but it seemed impossible to leave the island, since every ship that came or went was well guarded by order of the King. At length, watching the sea gulls in the air the only creatures that were sure of liberty-he thought of a plan for himself and his young son Icarus, who was captive with him.Little by little, he gathered a store of feathers great and small. He paste these together with thread, molded them in with wax, and so fashioned two great wings like those of a bird. When they were done, Daedalus fitted them to his own shoulders, and after one or two efforts, he found that by waving his arms he could winnow the air and cleave it, as a swimmer does the sea. He held himself aloft, wavered this way and that with the wind, and at last, like a great fledgling, he learned to fly.Without delay, he fell to work on a pair of wings for the boy Icarus and taught him carefully how to use them, bidding him beware of rash adventures among the stars. "Remember," said the father, "never to fly very low or very high, for the fogs about the earth would weigh you down, but the blaze of the sun will surely melt your feathers apart if you go too near."For Icarus, these cautions went in at one ear and out by the other. Who could remember to be careful when he was to fly for the first time? Are birds careful? Not they! And not an idea remained in the boy's head but the one joy of escape. The day came, and the fair wind that was to set them free. The father-bird put on his wings, and, while the light urged them to be gone, he waited to see that all was well with Icarus, for the two could not fly hand in hand. Up they rose, the boy after his father. The hateful ground of Crete sank beneath them; and the country folk, who caught a glimpse of them when they were high above the treetops, took it for a vision of the gods-Apollo, perhaps, with Cupid after him.At first there was a terror in the joy. The wide vacancy of the air dazed them-a glance downward made their brains reel. But when a great wind filled their wings, and Icarus felt himself sustained, like a halcyon bird in the hollow of a wave, like a child uplifted by his mother, he forgot everything in the world but joy. He forgot Crete and the other islands that he had passed over: he saw but vaguely that winged thing in the distance before him that was his father Daedalus. He longed for one draft of flight to quench the thirst of his captivity: he stretched out his arms to the sky and made toward the highest heavens. Alas for him! Warmer and warmer grew the air. Those arms, that had seemed to uphold him, relaxed. His wings wavered, dropped. He fluttered his young hands vainly-he was falling-and in that terror he remembered. The heat of the sun had melted the wax from his wings; the feathers were falling, one by one, like snowflakes; and there was none to help.He fell like a leaf tossed down by the wind, down, down, with one cry that overtook Daedalus far away. When he returned and sought high and low for the poor boy, he saw nothing but the birdlike feathers afloat on the water, and he knew that Icarus was drowned.The nearest island he named Icaria, in memory of the child; but he, in heavy grief, went to the temple of Apollo in Sicily and there hung up his wings as an offering. Never again did he attempt to fly.
  • Define Science:1. A systematized body of information derived from scientific method.2. A catalogue of observations or list of information to understand the world around us.3. A systematic ways of explaining a wide range of phenomenon in the simplest possible manner.4. A vast of knowledge contributed by people from different part of the word, regardless of gender, color, race, religion, or political ideology.5. A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.6. A system that uses experimentation to help explain observations and questions. System: It is composed of different components with different a functions, but work together for a single purpose.Scientific Method: A step-by-step procedure that involves observation, formulation of hypothesis, experimentation, formation of generalization, principles, and law.
  • Define Science:1. A systematized body of information derived from scientific method.2. A catalogue of observations or list of information to understand the world around us.3. A systematic ways of explaining a wide range of phenomenon in the simplest possible manner.4. A vast of knowledge contributed by people from different part of the word, regardless of gender, color, race, religion, or political ideology.5. A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.6. A system that uses experimentation to help explain observations and questions.
  • Define Science:1. A systematized body of information derived from scientific method.2. A catalogue of observations or list of information to understand the world around us.3. A systematic ways of explaining a wide range of phenomenon in the simplest possible manner.4. A vast of knowledge contributed by people from different part of the word, regardless of gender, color, race, religion, or political ideology.5. A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.6. A system that uses experimentation to help explain observations and questions.
  • Define Science:1. A systematized body of information derived from scientific method.2. A catalogue of observations or list of information to understand the world around us.3. A systematic ways of explaining a wide range of phenomenon in the simplest possible manner.4. A vast of knowledge contributed by people from different part of the word, regardless of gender, color, race, religion, or political ideology.5. A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.6. A system that uses experimentation to help explain observations and questions.
  • Define Science:1. A systematized body of information derived from scientific method.2. A catalogue of observations or list of information to understand the world around us.3. A systematic ways of explaining a wide range of phenomenon in the simplest possible manner.4. A vast of knowledge contributed by people from different part of the word, regardless of gender, color, race, religion, or political ideology.5. A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.6. A system that uses experimentation to help explain observations and questions.
  • Define Science:1. A systematized body of information derived from scientific method.2. A catalogue of observations or list of information to understand the world around us.3. A systematic ways of explaining a wide range of phenomenon in the simplest possible manner.4. A vast of knowledge contributed by people from different part of the word, regardless of gender, color, race, religion, or political ideology.5. A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.6. A system that uses experimentation to help explain observations and questions.
  • Define Science:1. A systematized body of information derived from scientific method.2. A catalogue of observations or list of information to understand the world around us.3. A systematic ways of explaining a wide range of phenomenon in the simplest possible manner.4. A vast of knowledge contributed by people from different part of the word, regardless of gender, color, race, religion, or political ideology.5. A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.6. A system that uses experimentation to help explain observations and questions.
  • The word science is derived from the Latin word “Scientia” means knowledge or to know
  • The word science is derived from the Latin word “Scientia” means knowledge or to know
  • Daedalus2.
  • Daedalus2.
  • Dacota_blue: What is science?

    1. 1. How much do you know about Science?
    2. 2. The Story of IcarusClick the Picture
    3. 3. Definition of Science• A systematized body of information derived from scientific method.• System: It is composed of different components with different a functions, but work together for a single purpose.
    4. 4. Definition of Science• A catalogue of observations or list of information to understand the world around us.
    5. 5. Definition of Science• A systematic ways of explaining a wide range of phenomenon in the simplest possible manner.
    6. 6. Definition of Science• A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.
    7. 7. Definition of Science• A vast of knowledge contributed by people from different part of the word, regardless of gender, color, race, religion, or political ideology.
    8. 8. Definition of Science• A knowledge gained through a careful observations of objects and events.
    9. 9. Definition of Science• A system that uses experimentation to help explain observations and questions.
    10. 10. Origin of the word Science “Scientia” Means to know or knowledge
    11. 11. Origin of the word Science “Scire” Means to know
    12. 12. THE STUDY OF SCIENCEFor hundreds of years,progress in search for amuch better life has beenslow.The world we live in nowwas then dominated by avast number of customs,beliefs, and traditions thatheld back scientificprogress for centuries.
    13. 13. THE STUDY OF SCIENCETake the early Greek forexample. They weremore into supernaturalpowers, mythology, andreliable on changes andmovements of heavenlybodies.
    14. 14. THE STUDY OF SCIENCEAccording to Aristotle, agreat philosopher, humanbeing begins by naturedesires to know.They seek the truth.They explore theenvironment to gainknowledge of the undyingstructure and compositionof the material world.
    15. 15. THE STUDY OF SCIENCEThe Greeks were probablythe first to “create” sciencewhen they used deductivethinking in investigation ofphenomena.In fact Thales (640-546 B.C.),a Greek philosopher,astronomer, and engineer,originated the science ofdeductive geometry whichwas later developed andsystematized by Euclid.
    16. 16. THE STUDY OF SCIENCEAs time has past, manyother science hadstudied and appliedwhat they’ve learnedand discovered inscience. They use it andcreated gadgets to makelife easier.
    17. 17. THE STUDY OF SCIENCENot to long ago, atRoslin Institute inScotland, Dolly, a clonedlamb, was introduced byIan Wilmut and hiscolleagues.Before this event,cloning was thought tobe only for plants ortinier organisms.
    18. 18. Tell what is being described. Heading to a Quiz Prepare ¼ sheet of Paper Close all your notesAvoid talking with your seatmates
    19. 19. Tell what is being described.1. He is the son of Daedalus.2. The first cloned sheep.3. A systematized body of knowledge.4. It is composed of different components with a functions.5. He stated that man desires to know.6. It means to know.7. It means knowledge.8. People who study science9. He originated the science of deductive geometry.10. The science of life.
    20. 20. Answers1. Icarus2. Dolly3. Science4. System5. Aristotle6. Scire7. Scientia8. Scientist9. Thales10. Biology
    21. 21. 1. What is Biology?2. Give 10 applications in which biology is used?

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