How Do Our Students Learn?: A Cognitive Psychological Model for Information Literacy Instruction

21,836 views

Published on

Dani Brecher and Kevin Michael Klipfel's presentation from LOEX 2014 in Grand Rapids, MI. Presented on 5/9/14. Read more on www.rulenumberoneblog.com

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

How Do Our Students Learn?: A Cognitive Psychological Model for Information Literacy Instruction

  1. 1. Dani Brecher Instructional Design & Technology Librarian The Claremont Colleges Library Kevin Michael Klipfel Information Literacy Coordinator California State University, Chico HOW DO OUR STUDENTS LEARN? A Cognitive Psychological Model for Information Literacy Instruction
  2. 2. LIBRARIAN AS EDUCATOR
  3. 3. STUDENT-CENTERED TEACHING
  4. 4. Understanding our students from their perspective: how they learn, what motivates them, what interests them. Then we tailor our instruction accordingly. STUDENT-CENTERED TEACHING
  5. 5. WHAT ARE WE AIMING FOR?
  6. 6. WHAT IS LEARNING? [T]he primary goal of education is to promote…a change in the learners knowledge. “ “ -Mayer and Wittrock, 2006
  7. 7. How will your instructional decisions optimize the opportunity for students to learn…skills and content? STUDENT-CENTERED TEACHING “ “ -Doyle, 2011
  8. 8. MEASURES OF LEARNING
  9. 9. MEASURES OF LEARNING RETENTION
  10. 10. How can I teach material to students so that it best facilitates the retention of information I’m presenting?
  11. 11. MEASURES OF LEARNING RETENTION TRANSFER
  12. 12. How can I teach material to students so that it best facilitates their ability to transfer information across domains?
  13. 13. COGNITIVE SCIENCE STUDY OF
  14. 14. COGNITIVE SCIENCE
  15. 15. COGNITIVE SCIENCE
  16. 16. COGNITIVE SCIENCE [Students] are more alike than different in terms of how they think and learn. “ “ -Willingham, 2009
  17. 17. COGNITIVE SCIENCE
  18. 18. COGNITIVE SCIENCE STUDENT-CENTERED LEARNING +
  19. 19. COGNITIVE SCIENCE STUDENT-CENTERED LEARNING INFORMATION LITERACY + +
  20. 20. 5PRINCIPLES for information literacy INSTRUCTION
  21. 21. Principle 1:: CREATE A PROBLEM CONTEXT
  22. 22. Students are more likely to pay attention if they see the relevance of instruction.
  23. 23. Providing conditional knowledge helps to promote transfer.
  24. 24. ASSIGNMENT
  25. 25. + ASSIGNMENT STAGE IN RESEARCH PROCESS
  26. 26. =PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED
  27. 27. Principle 2:: LIMIT LEARNING OUTCOMES
  28. 28. INFORMATION …A state of affairs where an individual’s efficiency in using information in their work is hampered by the amount of relevant, and potentially useful, information available to them. “ “ -Bawden and Robinson, 2009
  29. 29. Minimizing content maximizes retention.
  30. 30. Principle 3:: BUILD A NARRATIVE
  31. 31. The human mind seems exquisitely tuned to understand and remember stories – so much so that psychologists refer to stories as “psychologically privileged,” meaning that they are treated differently in memory than other types of material. “ “ -Willingham, 2009
  32. 32. Teaching thorough narrative maximizes retention.
  33. 33. We tell ourselves stories in order to live. “ “ -Joan Didion
  34. 34. Principle 4 FOCUS ON “DEEP STRUCTURE”
  35. 35. Deep structure is the inherent meaning of something.
  36. 36. Teaching to deep structure facilitates transfer.
  37. 37. Principle 5:: ACTIVE LEARNING IS PRACTICE OF DEEP STRUCTURE
  38. 38. As far as anyone knows, the only way to develop mental facility is to repeat the target process again and again and again. “ “ -Willingham, 2009
  39. 39. Practice facilitates retention. Deep structure facilitates transfer.
  40. 40. ASSIGNMENT PROMPT
  41. 41. ASSIGNMENT PROMPT
  42. 42. NARRATIVE STRUCTURE OR
  43. 43. In-N-Out Burger PB&J Sandwich CONTINUUM OF TASTINESS Truly Lousy Truly Delicious
  44. 44. Peer-Reviewed Articles “Popular” Articles Based in Research CONTINUUM OF RELIABILITY Least Reliable Most Reliable
  45. 45. CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES
  46. 46. CONTACT US www.rulenumberoneblog.com DANI BRECHER KEVIN MICHAEL KLIPFEL dani_brecher@cuc.claremont.edu kklipfel@csuchico.edu
  47. 47. QUESTIONS?
  48. 48. IMAGE CREDITS Slides 1, 20, 21, 27, 30, 33, 37, 456http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/the-brain-of-charles-babbage-1909/ Slide 2: http://ccdl.libraries.claremont.edu/cdm/ref/collection/ccp/id/6817 Slide 3: http://ccdl.libraries.claremont.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/ccp/id/7427/rec/16 Slide 5: http://ccdl.libraries.claremont.edu/cdm/ref/collection/ccp/id/5638 Slides 8-9, 11: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Plastic_tape_measure.jpg Slides 10, 12: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Teacher_and_students_in_day_school_classroom_-_NARA_- _295151.jpg Slides 13-15: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PSM_V46_D167_Outer_surface_of_the_human_brain.jpg Slide 16: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MRI_brain.jpg Slides 22-23: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Classroom_with_students_and_teachers_-_NARA_-_285702.jpg Slide 29: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Juddconcrete_1.jpg Slide 31: https://www.flickr.com/photos/christchurchcitylibraries/3187580978/ Slide 32: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:A_Story- teller_reciting_from_the_%22Arabian_Nights.%22_%281911%29_-_TIMEA.jpg Slide 33: http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1496393/thumbs/o-JOAN-DIDION-facebook.jpg Slide 35: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8c/David_-_The_Death_of_Socrates.jpg Slide 36: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bleecker_Street_- _Broadway_%E2%80%93_Lafayette_Street_transfer_2012-09-25.jpg Slide 38: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Youth_Leaders_at_Impington_College- _Education_and_Training_in_Cambridgeshire,_England,_UK,_April_1944_D19464.jpg Slide 39: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Basketball_Practice_1925.jpg Slide 45: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%22WE%27RE_READY_FOR_THE_CHALLENGE_TOMORROW._LETS_DO_THE _JOB_TOGETHER%22_-_NARA_-_516115.jpg
  49. 49. BIBLIOGRAPHY Bawden, D., & Robinson, L. (2009). The dark side of information: Overload, anxiety and other paradoxes and pathologies. Journal of Information Science, 35(2), 180-191. Doyle, T. (2011). Learner-Centered Teaching: Putting the Research on Learning into Practice. Sterling, VA: Stylus Pub. Mayer, R.E., & Wittrock, M.C. (2006). Problem Solving. The Handbook of Educational Psychology (pp. 289-303). New York: Routledge. Willingham, D. T. (2009). Why Don’t Students Like School?: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What it Means for the Classroom San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

×