Accessible Java Application User Interface Design Guidelines Lawrence J. Najjar, Ph.D. BMC Software* *Now at TandemSeven [...
Accessibility Challenges <ul><li>Java applications can be very complex </li></ul><ul><li>Java applications need to be acce...
Sample Java Application
Sample Java Application
The Need <ul><li>User interface design guidelines  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on accessibility requirements </li></ul></u...
Accessibility Requirements <ul><li>Section 508 of US Rehabilitation Act (General Services Administration, 2005) </li></ul>...
Paragraph 1194.21 Software Applications and Operating Systems <ul><li>Describes how to improve accessibility of  </li></ul...
Requirement A <ul><li>“ When software is designed to run on a system that has a keyboard, product functions shall be execu...
Keyboard <ul><li>Allow keyboard only users to perform (nearly) all functions </li></ul><ul><li>Define initial focus in eve...
Keyboard-Only
Initial Focus
Tabbing Order
Keyboard <ul><li>Design F10 to move keyboard focus to window menu bar (ex. File, Edit, View) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tab and...
Keyboard
Mnemonics <ul><li>Create mnemonics to allow users to press keys (ex. Alt-f) to move focus to a user interface control and ...
Mnemonics
Mnemonics
Shortcut Keys <ul><li>Provide shortcut keys (ex. Ctrl-c, Shift-F1, F1) to allow users to perform very frequent menu bar ac...
Shortcut Keys in Edit Menu
Combo Boxes <ul><li>Allow users to keep control </li></ul><ul><li>Allow users to move up and down choices without submitti...
Help <ul><li>Keyboard-only users need Help for required key combinations </li></ul><ul><li>In Help, describe ways to perfo...
Conclusions <ul><li>By following these guidelines, we can design and build accessible Java applications </li></ul><ul><li>...
 
References <ul><li>Epilepsy.com (2004a). Frequently asked questions. Retrieved February 10, 2005, from  http://www.epileps...
References <ul><li>Willuhn, D., Schulz, C., Knoth-Weber, L., Feger, S., & Saillet, Y. (2003). Developing accessible softwa...
Tool Tips <ul><li>Provide simple, alternative ways for users to access text in tool tips </li></ul><ul><li>For graphic (ex...
Tool Tip
Tool Tip
Tool Tip
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Accessible Java Application User Interface Design Guidelines

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  • Accessible Java Application User Interface Design Guidelines

    1. 1. Accessible Java Application User Interface Design Guidelines Lawrence J. Najjar, Ph.D. BMC Software* *Now at TandemSeven [email_address]
    2. 2. Accessibility Challenges <ul><li>Java applications can be very complex </li></ul><ul><li>Java applications need to be accessible </li></ul><ul><li>Most accessibility guidelines, tools, and other resources are for Web applications </li></ul>
    3. 3. Sample Java Application
    4. 4. Sample Java Application
    5. 5. The Need <ul><li>User interface design guidelines </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on accessibility requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tailored for Java applications </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Accessibility Requirements <ul><li>Section 508 of US Rehabilitation Act (General Services Administration, 2005) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Paragraph 1194.21 Software applications and operating systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Paragraph 1194.31 Functional performance criteria </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Paragraph 1194.41 Information, documentation, and support </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Paragraph 1194.21 Software Applications and Operating Systems <ul><li>Describes how to improve accessibility of </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interactive software applications (such as Java applications) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Operating systems </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Requirement A <ul><li>“ When software is designed to run on a system that has a keyboard, product functions shall be executable from a keyboard where the function itself or the result of performing a function can be discerned textually.” (General Services Administration, 2005) </li></ul>
    9. 9. Keyboard <ul><li>Allow keyboard only users to perform (nearly) all functions </li></ul><ul><li>Define initial focus in every window </li></ul><ul><li>Create tabbing order based on user needs </li></ul><ul><li>Provide tab stop for instructions </li></ul><ul><li>Define spacebar to select a choice, Enter key to perform window’s default action </li></ul>
    10. 10. Keyboard-Only
    11. 11. Initial Focus
    12. 12. Tabbing Order
    13. 13. Keyboard <ul><li>Design F10 to move keyboard focus to window menu bar (ex. File, Edit, View) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tab and left-right arrows move between menus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Down-up arrows open menus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Down-up arrows move within choices in menu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Right-left arrows move between open menus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Esc key closes menus </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provide keyboard alternatives for drag-and-drop </li></ul><ul><li>In multiple document interface, design Ctrl-F6 to move to next child window </li></ul>
    14. 14. Keyboard
    15. 15. Mnemonics <ul><li>Create mnemonics to allow users to press keys (ex. Alt-f) to move focus to a user interface control and activate it </li></ul><ul><li>Provide mnemonics for each menu bar item, choice in menu bar menus, and most frequently used controls in primary windows </li></ul><ul><li>For long list of check boxes or radio buttons, provide mnemonic for first item, arrow between items </li></ul><ul><li>Do not provide mnemonics for “OK” or “Cancel” </li></ul>
    16. 16. Mnemonics
    17. 17. Mnemonics
    18. 18. Shortcut Keys <ul><li>Provide shortcut keys (ex. Ctrl-c, Shift-F1, F1) to allow users to perform very frequent menu bar actions </li></ul><ul><li>Do not use “Alt” as shortcut key because is used for mnemonics </li></ul>
    19. 19. Shortcut Keys in Edit Menu
    20. 20. Combo Boxes <ul><li>Allow users to keep control </li></ul><ul><li>Allow users to move up and down choices without submitting a choice </li></ul><ul><li>Process choice only after user presses “Enter” key and selects submit button (ex. “Go”) </li></ul>
    21. 21. Help <ul><li>Keyboard-only users need Help for required key combinations </li></ul><ul><li>In Help, describe ways to perform functions for keyboard-only users </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bad: “To open the contextual menu, right-click on the item” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Good: “To open the contextual menu, right-click on the item or move focus to the item and press Shift-F10” </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Conclusions <ul><li>By following these guidelines, we can design and build accessible Java applications </li></ul><ul><li>Accessible Java applications are attractive to governments, companies, and schools </li></ul><ul><li>Accessibility is good business </li></ul>
    23. 24. References <ul><li>Epilepsy.com (2004a). Frequently asked questions. Retrieved February 10, 2005, from http://www.epilepsy.com/info/family_faq.html </li></ul><ul><li>Epilepsy.com (2004b, February). Reflex epilepsies. Retrieved February 10, 2005, from http://www.epilepsy.com/epilepsy/epilepsy_reflex.html </li></ul><ul><li>General Services Administration (2005). Section 508. Retrieved February 8, 2005, from http://www.section508.gov/index.cfm?FuseAction=Content&ID=12 </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft (2004). Official guidelines for user interface developers and designers. Retrieved February 10, 2004, from http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnwue/html/welcome.asp </li></ul><ul><li>Sun (2001). Java look and feel design guidelines (2 nd ed.). Boston: Addison-Wesley. Retrieved February 10, 2005, from http://java.sun.com/products/jlf/ed2/book/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>Watchfire (2005). Welcome to Bobby. Retrieved February 8, 2005, from http://bobby.watchfire.com/bobby/html/en/index.jsp </li></ul>
    24. 25. References <ul><li>Willuhn, D., Schulz, C., Knoth-Weber, L., Feger, S., & Saillet, Y. (2003). Developing accessible software for data visualization. IBM Systems Journal, 42(4), 652-668. Retrieved February 10, 2005, from http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/sj/424/willuhn.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>World Wide Web Consortium (2005). Web accessibility initiative (WAI). Retrieved February 8, 2005, from http://www.w3c.org/WAI/ </li></ul>
    25. 26. Tool Tips <ul><li>Provide simple, alternative ways for users to access text in tool tips </li></ul><ul><li>For graphic (ex. toolbar button), provide alternative text label </li></ul><ul><li>For line of date in table, provide hyperlink labeled “Show Details” </li></ul><ul><li>Create contextual menu for object that includes “Show Details” choice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contextual menu = Action menu bar menu via Shift-F10 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When user selects “Show Details” contextual menu choice, provide secondary window with tool tip text </li></ul></ul>
    26. 27. Tool Tip
    27. 28. Tool Tip
    28. 29. Tool Tip

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