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Mapping Edmonton Lecture to University of Alberta Human Geography and Planning Class (HGP240)

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A case study approach in the role that maps can play in understanding and communicating urban issues.

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Mapping Edmonton Lecture to University of Alberta Human Geography and Planning Class (HGP240)

  1. 1. Mapping Edmonton: From Air Quality to Place Names Matthew Dance M.A. @mattdance 1
  2. 2. Outline • Introduction – My background and how I came to mapping as part of my career. • Mapping Cities – Key concepts – Maps: Volunteered Geographic Information. – Maps: Open Data & Power. • What roles do maps play?
  3. 3. Introduction: Resume and Research
  4. 4. Resume • BA Physical Geography (Queen’s ‘95) • 7 years field experience - periglacial geomorphology, hydrology, pedology • 7 years in environmental policy (various roles – 1° facilitation / mediation) • 3 years to complete an MA in Human Geography (UofA ’12) • 12 years consulting on policy
  5. 5. Undergrad Research Map Asthma and Air Quality 5
  6. 6. M.A. Research Social science – case study research. 1. How do you understand place? 2. How do you communicate that understanding using emerging ‘novel’ tech? 3. Why? 4. What’s the gap between 1 & 2?
  7. 7. My lens • Place based thinking - people are experts of their geography. • How do people understand place? • How does place impact citizens (& vice versa) - happiness, health, community, family? • What is the power dynamic between citizens and local government around place? 7
  8. 8. Mental Maps
  9. 9. Narrative There was a path in the woods there, and we call that Moonies run because our teacher, Mr. Moonie, lived right there. My friend played guitar and I played guitar, and we used to take our amps, carry our amps across back and forth across the river. At this point here right in the middle of the bridge was we deemed that as perfectly half way, so we would say, ‘Okay, I’ll meet you on the bridge’. But yeah, I spent a lot of time down there, in Gold Bar. Chris
  10. 10. Mental Maps • Provide insight into what is important • Demonstrate a range of perception. – Why more detail in some areas, by some people? – Order of drawing - i.e. route first vs. river first? – What is mapping and what is not mapped? – What is said in relation to what is drawn? 10
  11. 11. 12 Mapping Cities
  12. 12. Who cares? Why map cities? 13
  13. 13. Key Concepts • Crowdsourcing & Volunteered Geographic Information • Open Data (and FOIP as a tool!) • Data visualization 14
  14. 14. Crowdsourcing .... the process of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people, and especially from an online community, rather than from traditional employees or suppliers. 15
  15. 15. Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) 16 VGI refers to a range of activities where volunteers provide some geographically referenced object to the Internet, such as: • Observational data (a Tweet that a tree is down in the River Valley) • A geotagging photograph (on Flickr or Instagram for instance) • GPS trace (a running route mapped with Strava)
  16. 16. Open Data ....can be freely used, re-used and redistributed by anyone - subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and share alike. Government held data such as the City of Edmonton, Provence of Alberta and Government of Canada. 17
  17. 17. 18 Power - Citizen/Government
  18. 18. Volunteered Geographic Information 19
  19. 19. OpenStreetMap: VGI Map Making 20
  20. 20. Open Edmonton, Open Art Context: Where are the public art installations in Edmonton? Questions: How can we gather and map these art installations? Would crowdsourcing work? By David Rauch (@davidwrauch) 21
  21. 21. Open Edmonton 22
  22. 22. VGI Air Quality Sensor Context: Emerging air quality monitoring technology that is location (place) based. Questions: • Does it work? • Data quality? • Ease of use? • Power dynamic? 23
  23. 23. Crowdsourcing AQ 24
  24. 24. Data quality? 25
  25. 25. Open Data and Power 26
  26. 26. Edmonton Bike/Pedestrian Collisions Context: 1. Bike Land Discussion 2. Open City / Open Data / Public Engagement Q: Where are people were getting hit by cars? Official A: We don’t know & we can’t tell you. Rebuttal: Bullshit. 27
  27. 27. FOIP 28
  28. 28. Edmonton Bike Collisions Data FOIPed from City of Edmonton 29 Map by Darcy Reynard (@geodarcy)
  29. 29. Whyte Ave Data 30
  30. 30. Downtown Land Use 31 Context: 1. Bike Land Discussion Q: How much space does car infrastructure occupy in the downtown core?
  31. 31. 32
  32. 32. Calculated Land Use • Surface Parking ~ 15% • Roadways ~ 12% • Total ~ 27% • Buildings ~ 25% • Parks ~ 6% • Trees ~ 2800 individual trees and over 25 species. 33
  33. 33. Daylight Mill Creek Context: Asked by Dr. Andrew Leach to build a map within on-line discussions around daylighting waterways. With the construction of the adjacent LRT there is the potential to reroute the Mill Creek channel into its original channel. 34
  34. 34. 35 1967 map of Mill Creek’s original channel.
  35. 35. Mill Creek looking south from the North Saskatchewan River 36
  36. 36. 37 Ground truthing elevations with a hand held GPS (my iPhone with a GPS app)
  37. 37. 38
  38. 38. Naming Edmonton: The Unmade Map • Context: TRC, statements of reconciliation made by Mayor Iveson. • Questions: – How many of Edmonton’s named places have FNM names? – Are those names geographically and culturally relevant? – What is the process of naming Edmonton, and are FNM involved? – Who cares? 39
  39. 39. Edmonton FNM Place Names 40
  40. 40. 41 First Nations & Metis Names in Edmonton
  41. 41. 42 Inuit Place Names - Baffin Island
  42. 42. Names in Edmonton • Edmonton has been occupied for the past 8000 years. • Currently over 10 000 named places in Edmonton. • 128 are related to First Nations or Metis • Much fewer are culturally relevant. • Is this appropriate? 43
  43. 43. Role of maps? 44
  44. 44. What role can a map play? • Policy • Another way to view data. • Communications tool. • Engage citizens and give people a voice • What else? 45
  45. 45. QUESTIONS? matt dance | matt@matthewdance.ca | @mattdance 46

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