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Chapter 5: Pose, Probe, & Teach    Q:“The text says that „Joseph Galloway of     Pennsylvania…warned that the colonies  fa...
Chapter 5: Pose, Probe, & Teach       A: At this point in time, the main issue that divided  lawmakers in the United State...
THE FOUNDING                       FATHERS ON                        SLAVERY    John Jay                             Georg...
Slavery in the Articles     of Confederation• No mention of slavery     at all in document      • Most important   legisla...
The Northwest Ordinance of 1787               <BACK             What was it?                       •The “Northwest Ordinan...
What the Northwest        Ordinance did:<BACK        •14 preliminary "sections" and six        "articles of compact“      ...
So if prohibition was how the Articles of Confederation wanted to deal with slavery,    how did the Constitution respond?<...
SLAVERY IN THE                CONSTITUTION        • Article I, Section 2, Clause 3:          The “Three-Fifths          Co...
The 3/5 Clause                        <BACK1787Who: The Northern and Southern representatives at the 1787 Constitutional C...
In ConClusIon … • Much of the same tension existed between the   North and South during the drafting of the   Constitution...
Works CitedMintz, S. (2007). Digital History. Retrieved October 23, 2011 fromhttp://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu"The Slavery ...
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Palmer, Pollard, Verzuh - Slavery & Constitution

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Palmer, Pollard, Verzuh - Slavery & Constitution

  1. 1. Chapter 5: Pose, Probe, & Teach Q:“The text says that „Joseph Galloway of Pennsylvania…warned that the colonies faced grave dangers, including the possibility of war between southerners and northerners, without British governance.‟ What tensions were there between the North and South already during this time?”By Jordan Palmer, Miranda Pollard, and Dan Verzuh NEXT>
  2. 2. Chapter 5: Pose, Probe, & Teach A: At this point in time, the main issue that divided lawmakers in the United States was slavery, as it would be for the next eighty years. On the one hand, slaver labor had allowed the Southern states to produce great quantities of cotton, sugar, and tobacco as exports to fuel the fledgling American economy.Southerners also wanted to use slaves as population leverage to gain more power. On the other, many Northerners were opposed to slavery for both political and moral reasons; they didn‟t want the South to become, in their view, unfairly powerful under the new government, and the humanitarian abolitionist<BACK movement was starting to gain ground. NEXT>
  3. 3. THE FOUNDING FATHERS ON SLAVERY John Jay George Washington Benjamin Franklin Thomas Jefferson<BACK NEXT>
  4. 4. Slavery in the Articles of Confederation• No mention of slavery at all in document • Most important legislation, however, directly addressed slavery NORTHWEST ORDINANCE<BACK NEXT>
  5. 5. The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 <BACK What was it? •The “Northwest Ordinance” Click was an act passed in 1787 by for the Continental Congress that sound as one of the final provisions of the Articles of Confederation. •Refers to the “Old Northwest”, which is the area lying west of Pennsylvania, north of the Ohio River, and east of the Mississippi River to the border with Canada. •designated democratic principles, self-governance, and separation into sixteen new states in the “Old Northwest”. NEXT>
  6. 6. What the Northwest Ordinance did:<BACK •14 preliminary "sections" and six "articles of compact“ •2nd Section talks about property, like making wills and settling estates. This section also outlined the process of transitioning from territorial status to statehood. •6th Article bans slavery in the regions, along with involuntary servitude. (Does allow for recovery of fugitive slaves, though.) •The 6th Article is most famous for being the first piece of nationa legislature to try to prohibit slavery. •Unfortunately though, the Ordinance was not very effective in enforcing this clause. Nevertheless, it was a notable product of the Articles of Confederation-era government.
  7. 7. So if prohibition was how the Articles of Confederation wanted to deal with slavery, how did the Constitution respond?<BACK NEXT>
  8. 8. SLAVERY IN THE CONSTITUTION • Article I, Section 2, Clause 3: The “Three-Fifths Compromise” of the Enumeration Clause • Article I, Section 9, Clause 1: Putting off the slave importation decision for 20 years until 1808 • Article IV, Section 2, Clause 3: The Fugitive Slave Clause<BACK NEXT>
  9. 9. The 3/5 Clause <BACK1787Who: The Northern and Southern representatives at the 1787 Constitutional ConventionWhat: A compromise between the North and South, counting each slave as 3/5 of aperson for tax distribution and representation purposesWhen/Where: The Constitutional Convention that took place in Philadelphia in 1787Why: After the Northwest Ordinance was passed, the South felt that they needed morepro-slavery representation; they wanted their slaves to be counted as citizens so that theirnumber of representatives in the House, proportional to state population, would increase.The North disagreed. Here’s why: “Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons” – Article 1, Section 2, Paragraph 3, The United States Constitution
  10. 10. In ConClusIon … • Much of the same tension existed between the North and South during the drafting of the Constitution as right up to the Civil War: slavery and all the social, political, & economic differences that come with it. • The difference between the periods was that the leadership in the 1780‟s was willing to put aside differences for awhile for the good of unifying the nation, but eventually they had to be taken up again; these led to the Civil War.<BACK NEXT>
  11. 11. Works CitedMintz, S. (2007). Digital History. Retrieved October 23, 2011 fromhttp://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu"The Slavery Compromises." UL-Lafayette Computing Support Services. UCS. Web. 23 Oct. 2011.<http://www.ucs.louisiana.edu/~ras2777/amgov/slavery2.html>.Oracle ThinkQuest. "Compromises." ThinkQuest. Oracle, 2011. Web. 23 Oct. 2011.<http://library.thinkquest.org/CR0215469/compromises.htm>.16, July. "Art & History Home Historical Minutes 1787-1800 A Great Compromise." U.S. Senate. Web. 23 Oct. 2011.<http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/minute/A_Great_Compromise.htm>"Constitutional Topic: Slavery." The U.S. Constitution Online. Web. 26 Oct. 2011.<http://www.usconstitution.net/consttop_slav.html>. <BACK http://thundercloud.net/sept11/america/

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