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Astronomy (1)

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Astronomy (1)

  1. 1. ASTRONOMY BY DAMMIKA SANDARUWAN Space Applications Division ARTHUR.C.CLARK INSTITUTE FOR TECHNOLOGIES
  2. 2. 2)SCIENTIFIC TYPE 3)SCIENTIST 4) SUCCESS OF SCIENCE 1) NATURE OF THE SCIENCE
  3. 3. 5)LIMIT OF THE SCIENCE 6)ASTRONOMY & ASTROLOGY 7) Objectives of Astronomy 8) NUMBERS
  4. 4. 1) What’s the Astronomy ? 2) Why Are You Study From Astronomy?
  5. 5. ASTRONOMY ENVIRONMENT Economical environment familiarly national 1) 2) Technological environment 3) Political environment
  6. 6. Economics 1) What is a economic ? 2) Human needs & wants 4) Self interest 5) Why sturdy econ 3) Classified of Goods & service 6) Limited resources 7) Opportunity cost 8) Utility
  7. 7. Classification of Astronomy Astronomy Astro Biology Astro Chemistry Astro Physics Observation, Theory & research
  8. 8. Solar System Main Star ; SUN <ul><li>Mercury </li></ul><ul><li>Venus </li></ul><ul><li>Earth </li></ul><ul><li>Mars </li></ul><ul><li>Jupiter </li></ul><ul><li>Saturn </li></ul><ul><li>Uranus </li></ul><ul><li>Neptune </li></ul>PLANETS Statistics 0 0 1 2 65 35 28 15
  9. 9. SUN SATURN Sixth planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: 9.54 AU = 1,427,000,000 KM Diameter: 120,000 KM Mass: 95.15 Earths Density: 0.7 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: -274 F Orbital period: 29 years, 168 days Saturn is perhaps the best known astronomical object by picture. Its beauty in even small telescopes is breathtaking, and larger scopes reveal details in the delicate ring structure and colored bands in the outer layers of the atmosphere. The rings consist of billions of particles (probably water and methane ice) ranging from a few centimeters to a few meters in diameter. There are three major ring systems, separated by the Cassini division (outer) and the Encke division (inner).
  10. 10. sun
  11. 11. Mercury MERCURY First planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: .39 AU = 58,000,000 KM Diameter: 4880 KM Mass: 0.06 Earths Density: 5.4 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: 800 F to -360 F Orbital period: 88 days Mercury is hard to see from Earth because it is so small and so close to the sun. At certain times of the year, it can be seen just after sunset or before sunrise. The rest of the time it is lost in the sun's glare.
  12. 12. Mercury
  13. 13. venus VENUS Second planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: .72 AU = 108,000,000 KM Diameter: 12100 KM Mass: 0.95 Earths Density: 5.2 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: 900 F Orbital period: 226 days Venus, the brightest object in the sky except for the Sun and the Moon, is often visible for several hours just after sunset or before sunrise (hence it's name as the &quot;Evening&quot; or &quot;Morning&quot; star.) Visited by spacecraft from both the U.S.A and U.S.S.R, much of the surface has been mapped by radar. When viewed with a small telescope, Venus exhibits phases like the Moon and larger instruments may reveal details in the thick clouds covering the entire planet.
  14. 14. Venus
  15. 15. EARTH EARTH Third planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: 1 AU = 150,000,000 KM Diameter: 12,760 KM Mass: 6.0 x 10 to the 27th grams Density: 5.5 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temp: -60 to 120 F
  16. 16. EARTH
  17. 17. MARS MARS Fourth planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: 1.52 AU = 228,000,000 KM Diameter: 6800 KM Mass: 0.53 Earths Density: 3.9 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: 72 F to -271 F Orbital period: 686 days Mars appears reddish in our sky, even to the naked eye. This is caused by the rich content of rust (iron oxide) in the top soil. In the Martian springtime the surface of the planet changes color due to seasonal winds covering and uncovering darker surfaces of reddish dust. Mars has two small moons - Phobos is the larger and zips around Mars in only 7 1/2 hours. Deimos, the smaller moon, takes 30 hours to orbit.
  18. 18. MARS
  19. 19. JUPITER JUPITER Fifth planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: 5.20 AU = 778,000,000 KM Diameter: 143,800 KM Mass: 317.89 Earths Density: 1.3 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: -200 F Orbital period: 11 years, 321 days Jupiter is the Solar System's largest planet - its composition is more like a star than a planet. Bright belts, changing cloud structures, four main moons (each larger than Earth's satellite) and the Great Red Spot are all easily visible in small telescopes.
  20. 20. JUPITER
  21. 21. SATURN SATURN Sixth planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: 9.54 AU = 1,427,000,000 KM Diameter: 120,000 KM Mass: 95.15 Earths Density: 0.7 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: -274 F Orbital period: 29 years, 168 days Saturn is perhaps the best known astronomical object by picture. Its beauty in even small telescopes is breathtaking, and larger scopes reveal details in the delicate ring structure and colored bands in the outer layers of the atmosphere. The rings consist of billions of particles (probably water and methane ice) ranging from a few centimeters to a few meters in diameter. There are three major ring systems, separated by the Cassini division (outer) and the Encke division (inner).
  22. 22. SATURN
  23. 23. URANUS URANUS Seventh planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: 19.2 AU = 2,870,000,000 KM Diameter: 52,300 KM Mass: 14.54 Earths Density: 1.2 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: < -250 F Orbital period: 84.01 years Without the information gathered by Voyager 2, little would be known about this distant planet. Although visible in small to medium telescopes, not nuch is revealed by Earth-based observation other than Uranus' pale blue color. The planet is now know to have a system of at least nine rings.
  24. 24. URANUS
  25. 25. NEPTUNE NEPTUNE Eighth planet from the Sun Mean distance from Sun: 30.06 AU = 4,497,000,000 KM Diameter: 49,500 KM Mass: 17.23 Earths Density: 1.7 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: < -250 F Orbital period: 164.79 years Similar in size and composition to Uranus, the eighth planet is so far from Earth that ground-based observations reveal little detail. Voyager 2 data confirm the presence of a tenuous ring system. Neptune's largest moon, Triton, may be glimpsed in telescopes of apertures of 30 cm.
  26. 26. NEPTUNE
  27. 27. MOONS MOON Earth's Satellite Mean distance from Earth: 384,400 KM Diameter: 3476 KM Mass: 0.0123 Earths Density: 3.34 grams / cubic centimeter Surface temperature: 248 F to -274 F Orbital period (Synodic): 29.53 days The Earth and Moon form a double-planet system. The Moon is the closest astronomical body to the Earth and we know more about it than any other object in the heavens. Many surface features are visible to the unaided eye, and a pair of binoculars reveals a great amount of detail. A small telescope shows vast seas of lava, large mountain ranges and hundreds of craters of all sizes. Studies of the 382 kg of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo missions have revealed much about the early history of both the Moon and the Earth.
  28. 28. MOONS
  29. 29. Stars Planets Asteroids Comets galaxies Pulsars Black holes
  30. 32. THANK YOU

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