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The Next Generation of Gender Partnership

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How to engage men (especially millennials) in gender partnership at work. Presentation at WITI conference.

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The Next Generation of Gender Partnership

  1. 1. MALE MILLENNIALS ALLIES OR OBSTACLES IN GENDER EQUALITY? with Dale Thomas Vaughn
  2. 2. “MEN OF QUALITY ARE NOT AFRAID 
 OF WOMEN WITH EQUALITY… 
 YOU ARE ONE OF THE 
 LEADERS OF MEN OF QUALITY.” Gloria Allred
  3. 3. 12 SEPT. 2017
  4. 4. IT WAS TRULY AN UNPRECEDENTED, POSITIVE, AND POWERFUL EXPERIENCE IN MY LIFE TO BE SURROUNDED BY MALE ALLIES. I HAVE NEVER FELT MORE SUPPORTED, LISTENED TO, AND INCLUDED BY A GROUP OF MALES. Amy Logan
 President, US National Committee for UN Women - SF Bay Chapter
  5. 5. As Seen On: Previous Speaking, Clients and Programming:
  6. 6. TODAY’S AGENDA TODAY WE’LL COVER 1. WHAT IS THE IMPACT MILLENNIALS COULD HAVE ON GENDER PARTNERSHIP? 2. WHY ENGAGING MEN (ESPECIALLY MILLENNIAL MEN) IS IMPORTANT 3. HOW TO BUILD SYSTEMS INTO YOUR BUSINESS TO ENGAGE MEN
  7. 7. GENDER PARTNERSHIP WHAT IS GENDER PARTNERSHIP? ▸ EQUALITY: The state of being equal in rights, treatment, quan4ty, access or value to all others in a specific group. ▸ EQUITY: Ac4ons, treatment of others, or a general condi4on characterized by jus4ce, fairness, and impar4ality. ▸ PARTNERSHIP: Full, synergy-crea4ng collabora4on between people or groups working together toward a common goal.
  8. 8. CONTEXT WHAT IS NEEDED FOR GENDER PARTNERSHIP? ▸ (Test the systems) 
 IDENTIFY BARRIERS AND BLIND SPOTS ▸ (Preparing the Astronauts) 
 LEVERAGE WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP ▸ (Start the Countdown)
 ENGAGE MEN
  9. 9. WHAT’S THE SECRET TO ENGAGING MEN?
  10. 10. ENGAGING MEN Roll-Out of the Gender Partnership Process 3 Years to Sustainable Culture Development Gender Leadership Group • Engaging Men as Allies: Why and How – a 3-hour workshop with the Women’s ERG • Quarterly conference calls: To celebrate wins and coach on breakdowns. • Gender Partnership: What’s In It for Men? - Women's ERG-sponsored workshops for men to learn about Gender Partnership and the case for men as advocates for it. • Cross-Gender Communication: A “gender fishbowl” communication event to launch the next era of gender relations (the men in the event in number 3 above would be the prime audience for this event, and would be encouraged to bring other men as well) Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 •Enrollment of senior executives as advocates • Full engagement from the top leadership is the single most important factor in culture change. • Initial Engaging Men Workshop for senior executives followed by individual coaching and quarterly one-day refreshers to engage with what is working well, needs improvement.. • Enrollment of middle management through a process similar to that for senior executives. • Middle managers are where the rubber meets the road in terms of executing on the new culture of gender partnership. They will need to be fully engaged and given tools to create gender partnership in their teams, their relationships with each other, and to be role models for the organization. • Roll-out of the initiative to all levels of the organization through short workshops, webinars, brown- bag lunches, and internal communications efforts • Anchoring of inclusive leadership as a core value with creation of forums, structures, and processes to ensure sustainability of the new culture. A Foundation in Allies Leadership Buy-In Cultural Value SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP COMMITMENT COMMUNICATION IMPACT THE MANDATORY MIND SHIFTS 1. IMPACT
 WHY DOES THIS MATTER TO ME? 2. COMMUNICATION
 HOW DO WE OPEN THE DIALOGUE? 3. COMMITMENT
 HOW DO WE MEASURE COMMITMENT? 4. LEADERSHIP
 WHO ARE VISIBLE ALLIES AND MODELS? 5. SUSTAINABILITY
 AWARENESS VS. CULTURE CHANGE
  11. 11. Top 8 Ways to Engage Men
 In Full Gender Partnership in Your Workplace If you are an organization or Team If you are a Woman If you are a Man who “Gets” it 1. Bring Men Together Use the men in your organization who “get” it to engage men who are still on the sidelines to get into the game. Ask each member of your women’s initiative to invite a male colleague to their next event. Tell men what’s in it for them, personally and professionally. 2. Have honest conversations about the impact of gender Start a men’s conversation. Share with employees, suppliers and investors the potential impact on the bottom line and stock value. Companies with fewer women in senior leadership positions are 48% less profitable and have a 37% lower return on equity. Include men in the conversation about the positive outcomes of full gender partnership. Ask men what it will take for them to be full gender partners. Explore the ways that women, with their innate tendency toward communication, collaboration and consensus-building, bring balance to work place traditions and attitudes. Read current thought leaders on the future of leadership. 3. Help men “get” that gender bias still exists Give your workforce the facts. For easy access to a multitude of statistics on the current state of gender bias at work, see Harvard Business Review’s: “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know About Women in the Workplace.” Share a story with your male mentor or sponsor from your personal experience, without blaming or shaming the people who made you feel “less than.” Encourage other men to ask the women in their lives - mother, wife, daughter, girlfriend, sisters, friends - if and how they have been affected by gender bias. 4. Engage men’s sense of fair play Set learning objectives for your training content that help men recognize the personal costs they suffer due to gender bias. Provide opportunities for self-reflection. Let men know the facts in your industry and in your company. Find the point of connection for your male colleagues and friends. Even if a man is unable or unwilling to see how unfair it is for him to have unreasonable advantages over his female colleagues, he may still be convinced to take action so his wife or daughters are not similarly shortchanged. 5. Encourage men in behaviors that are linked to awareness of gender bias Have influential managers, men who “get” it, play an integral role in inviting employees to participate in company efforts to increase gender awareness. Identify strategic male partners and engage them in a constructive dialogue about their own gender perspective. Lead by example by ensuring gender balance in the appointments and teams you manage, control, or influence. 6. Encourage men to champion and be architects of win-win outcomes. Use the men in your organization who “get” it to engage men who are still on the sidelines to get into the game. Ask each member of your women’s initiative to invite a male colleague to their next event. Tell men what’s in it for them, personally and professionally. 7. Engage men’s innate desire to take action Explore with groups of men and women where conformity to masculine norms is being rewarded at your company. Initiate exploratory win-win partnership conversations with men. Use inquiry based dialogue to find out what the win is for your male peer(s). Invest your time in mentoring women. 8. Attach accountability to actions to support productive business outcomes Establish compelling metrics, like time to promotion, retention, balance of gender in the leadership pipeline, and increase in female talent attraction. Evaluate the men you manage on their performance in building more balanced teams. Share with female colleagues your intention to be a partnership champion and ask how you can support them. Don’t Worry! I will share these
 Templates and Exercises
 with you
  12. 12. WHAT IS THE IMPACT MILLENNIALS CAN HAVE ON GENDER PARTNERSHIP?
  13. 13. “Their behaviour is coloured by their experience of the global economic crisis.” Price Waterhouse Cooper THE FIRST THING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT MILLENNIALS
  14. 14. MY FIRST BUSINESS TRIP IN THE “REAL WORLD”
  15. 15. Millennials are the first native gender-neutral generation. THE SECOND THING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT MILLENNIALS
  16. 16. “97% of Millennials think their generation will finally achieve equality of opportunity for emerging female leaders.” ManpowerGroup THE FIRST NATIVE GENDER-NEUTRAL GENERATION
  17. 17. The attitude of the millennial generation that will have most impact on the daily lives of Americans is the distinctive and historically unprecedented belief that there are no inherently male or female roles in society. 
 “Race? No, Millennials Care Most About Gender Equality.”
 The Atlantic THE FIRST NATIVE GENDER-NEUTRAL GENERATION
  18. 18. More than two-thirds of people ages 14 to 34 say gender no longer defines destiny or behavior as it once did. The Intelligence Group THE FIRST NATIVE GENDER-NEUTRAL GENERATION
  19. 19. Pew MILLENNIAL ATTITUDES TOWARD GENDER EQUALITY AT WORK EASIER FOR MEN TO GET AHEAD 66% THINK THAT 
 NEEDS TO CHANGE 66%
  20. 20. “Millennials prefer organizations that have open, transparent and inclusive leadership styles” Deloitte THE FIRST NATIVE GENDER-NEUTRAL GENERATION
  21. 21. “Neither gender seems very focused on that promotion.” Pew MILLENNIAL ATTITUDES TOWARD GENDER EQUALITY AT WORK WANT TO BE THE BOSS 34% WANT TO BE THE BOSS 24% WOMEN MEN
  22. 22. WHY ENGAGING MEN (ESPECIALLY MALE MILLENNIALS) IS SO IMPORTANT
  23. 23. ONLY 1 IN 9 MEN BELIEVES THAT WOMEN HAVE FEWER OPPORTUNITIES THAN MEN, AND 13 PERCENT OF MEN BELIEVE IT IS HARDER FOR MEN TO ADVANCE BECAUSE OF GENDER-DIVERSITY PROGRAMS. McKinsey & Lean In
  24. 24. “THREE-FIFTHS (59%) OF LEADERS INTERVIEWED SAID THEY BELIEVE THE SINGLE MOST POWERFUL THING AN ORGANIZATION CAN DO TO PROMOTE MORE WOMEN LEADERS IS TO CREATE A GENDER- NEUTRAL CULTURE, LED BY THE CEO.” ManpowerGroup WHY WE HAVE TO START ENGAGING MEN
  25. 25. “THE MOST SIGNIFICANT OBSTACLE IDENTIFIED IS AN ENTRENCHED MALE CULTURE, A BARRIER THAT EVEN MEN ACKNOWLEDGED MUST CHANGE.” ManpowerGroup WHY WE HAVE TO START ENGAGING MEN
  26. 26. “FIFTY PERCENT OF MILLENNIAL MEN AND 68 PERCENT OF WOMEN BELIEVE A GLASS CEILING EXISTS.” Spring 2016 Harvard Public Opinion Project poll WHY WE HAVE TO START ENGAGING MEN
  27. 27. “MORE THAN HALF OF MILLENNIAL MEN THINK THAT THEY ENJOY MORE ADVANTAGES THAN WOMEN IN AMERICAN SOCIETY, LESS THAN 20 PERCENT OF THEM IDENTIFY AS FEMINISTS.” Spring 2016 Harvard Public Opinion Project poll WHY WE HAVE TO START ENGAGING MEN
  28. 28. CONTEXT WHAT IS NEEDED FOR GENDER PARTNERSHIP? ▸ (Test the systems) 
 IDENTIFY BARRIERS AND BLIND SPOTS ▸ (Preparing the Astronauts) 
 LEVERAGE WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP ▸ (Start the Countdown)
 ENGAGE MEN
  29. 29. HOW TO BUILD SYSTEMS INTO YOUR BUSINESS TO ENGAGE MEN? Go on a bias scavenger hunt Bias or Blind Spot Whose blind spot? Mine or someone else’s? How the bias is holding us back Male-bonding activity: Watch for male-centered team activities like golf or cigars. Ask women what they would like to do as a team builder. Mansplaining: Watch for a man explaining something to a woman who is likely to know as much or more than him about the topic. Manterrupting: Watch for a man talking over or interrupting a woman as she voices a concern or an idea; or a man repeating what a woman says, only louder, and then getting undue credit for her idea. Irrelevant gender assumptions: Watch for pre-judgments about what a person might want because of their gender. For instance, reading CVs and assuming a woman won’t want to move or travel because she may be a mother. Gender Leadership Group Contact Us to Learn More About Quotes, Availability or Delivery info@GenderLeadershipGroup.com “Empowered Leadership Through Gender Partnership” Be Time aware: Watch for snap judgments that reward men. Research shows that unconscious bias tends to favor men in time crunches, and tends to be more balanced when there is time to fully examine all of the options.
  30. 30. IMPACT WHY DOES THIS MATTER TO ME? 1
  31. 31. FIRMS WITH THE GREATEST GENDER DIVERSITY AMONG EXECUTIVES AND BOARD MEMBERS [EARNED] 300% MORE REVENUE 
 AND 50% HIGHER PROFIT 
 THAN THE AVERAGE COMPANY UC Davis 400 public companies reviewed THE BUSINESS CASE
  32. 32. GENDER DIVERSITY IN THE BOARD ROOM AND C-SUITE INCREASES FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE BY 33% TO 50% ON MEASURES LIKE ROE AND RETURN ON SALES Multiple studies by Credit Suisse, Catalyst, McKinsey, and Deloitte THE BUSINESS CASE
  33. 33. WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES TODAY SPEND MORE MONEY THAN THE ECONOMIES OF INDIA AND CHINA COMBINED. Michael J. Silverstein and Kate Sayre
 Harvard Business Review THE BUSINESS CASE
  34. 34. WE TRACK EVERYTHING POSSIBLE IN ORGANIZATIONS EXCEPT THE ADVANCEMENT OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES. Jeffery Tobias Halter Why Women? THE BUSINESS CASE
  35. 35. I GET IT GENDER PARTNERSHIP IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS
 WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME?
  36. 36. PERSONAL CASE FOR MEN WHAT MEN GAIN PERSONALLY ▸ Less worry ▸ Less time at work ▸ More quantity AND quality time with loved ones ▸ Better relationship satisfaction ▸ Better sex
  37. 37. OF THE 1% OF U.S. CORPORATIONS THAT OFFERED UNPAID PARENTAL LEAVE, ONLY 1% OF MALE EMPLOYEES TOOK IT. Michael Kimmel, PhD
 Harvard Business Review PERSONAL CASE FOR MEN
  38. 38. IF YOU ARE NOT ADVOCATING FOR WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE, YOU ARE HURTING YOUR DAUGHTERS’ FUTURE. Jeffery Tobias Halter
 Why Women? PERSONAL CASE FOR MEN
  39. 39. I GET IT GENDER PARTNERSHIP IS GOOD FOR MY LIFE
 BUT IS IT TOP PRIORITY?
  40. 40. The economic case for gender parity of additional annual GDP in 2025 in the full-potential scenario of bridging the gender gap... … equivalent to the combined US and China economies today. $28 trillion Equal to 2x the likely contribution of women to global GDP growth in the business-as-usual scenario McKinsey Global Institute’s Gender Parity Score points to where 95 countries stand on gender parity. 0.71 Western Europe 0.67 Eastern Europe, Central Asia These countries, grouped into 10 regions, are home to 93% of the world’s female population. Gender inequality (1.00 = gender parity) Extremely highHigh 0.64 Latin America 0.48 Middle East, N. Africa could be added in 2025 if all countries matched their best-in-region country in progress toward gender parity. 0.57 Sub-Saharan Africa 0.74 North America, Oceania¹ 0.48 India 0.61 China 0.62 East & South East Asia (excl. China) 0.44 South Asia (excl. India) $12 trillion
  41. 41. PREDICTORS OF RAPE-PRONE/FREE SOCIETIES 1. WOMEN’S AUTONOMY 2. FATHER’S INVOLVEMENT IN CHILD-REARING Peggy Reeves Sanday, PhD
 MORAL CASE
  42. 42. WHAT’S THE CATCH HOW GENDER EQUAL SOCIETIES BENEFIT MEN: ▸ The likelihood of being victim of violent death decreases significantly. ▸ In the most gender equal countries this likelihood is almost half that of the least gender equal countries. ▸ Gender equal countries score much higher on well- being… ▸ …and lower on depression among both men and women. ▸ Gender equality has equally strong effects on health and welfare as wage equity. ▸ The countries that have been most negatively affected by the financial crisis are also the ones in which men participate least in unpaid care work (at home)
  43. 43. COMMUNICATION HOW ARE WE GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM? 2
  44. 44. Go on a bias scavenger hunt Bias or Blind Spot Whose blind spot? Mine or someone else’s? How the bias is holding us back Male-bonding activity: Watch for male-centered team activities like golf or cigars. Ask women what they would like to do as a team builder. Mansplaining: Watch for a man explaining something to a woman who is likely to know as much or more than him about the topic. Manterrupting: Watch for a man talking over or interrupting a woman as she voices a concern or an idea; or a man repeating what a woman says, only louder, and then getting undue credit for her idea. Irrelevant gender assumptions: Watch for pre-judgments about what a person might want because of their gender. For instance, reading CVs and assuming a woman won’t want to move or travel because she may be a mother. Gender Leadership Group Be Time aware: Watch for snap judgments that reward men. Research shows that unconscious bias tends to favor men in time crunches, and tends to be more balanced when there is time to fully examine all of the options. Bias Scavenger Hunt Gender Leadership Group
  45. 45. WHAT IS INVISIBLE TO YOU RELATED TO YOUR GENDER?
  46. 46. Blind Spot Discovery Questions Gender Leadership Group 3 questions to ask yourself to raise awareness about your blind spots 1. What advantages and/or benefits might you experience in work and life simply because you are male? 2. If you had siblings of the opposite gender what do you recall about how they were treated and have these experiences affected your present day interactions with the other gender? 3. What did you witness in your home regarding partnership between parental figures? 3 questions to ask a woman that elicit honest answers about their experience 1. Do you believe you have the same opportunity for advancement in your place of employment as men? 2. What are one or two things you want me to understand about what its like being a woman in the workplace? 3. What kind of support can I offer you in partnership? Notes
  47. 47. FISHBOWL QUESTIONS FOR MEN ▸ Do you ever feel like you are walking on eggshells at work… when or how? ▸ Where do you feel like you are getting mixed messages as to gender equality? ▸ What is it that you want women to do to help your company improve?
  48. 48. FISHBOWL QUESTIONS FOR WOMEN ▸ Have you ever experienced not feeling heard or being dismissed and what was the impact of that? ▸ What are some of the ways you have or still conform to fit into male culture? ▸ What is it that you want men to do to help your company improve?
  49. 49. COMMITMENT BY WHEN DO WE EXPECT TO ACTUALLY CORRECT SYSTEMIC ISSUES? 3
  50. 50. ENGAGING MEN WHERE ARE YOU ON THE ISSUE? 1.Unaware – I don’t see the issue as mission critical. 2.Afraid - I might lose something. What will others (other men) think of me. 3.Apathetic – I don’t really care. 4.Frustrated - I see it, but I don’t know how to affect it. 5.Committed – I’ll do whatever is needed for full Gender Partnership.
  51. 51. Diversity training. Do people who undergo training usually shed their biases? Researchers have been examining that question since before World War II, in nearly a thousand studies. It turns out that while people are easily taught to respond correctly to a questionnaire about bias, they soon forget the right answers. The positive effects of diversity training rarely last beyond a day or two, and a number of studies suggest that it can activate bias or spark a backlash. Nonetheless, nearly half of midsize companies use it, as do nearly all the Fortune 500.
  52. 52. COMMITMENT WHAT’S AT RISK? ▸If we do nothing? ▸If we try, but fail? ▸If we succeed?
  53. 53. LEADERSHIP WHO ARE VISIBLE ALLIES AND ROLE MODELS? 4
  54. 54. LEADERSHIP WHAT YOU CAN DO ▸ Get interested and learn about your unconscious bias and how it influences your leadership. ▸ Contemplate the unintended impact of your unexamined biases. Ask women in your life (colleagues, wives, sisters and daughters) to share with you how they have been impacted by gender bias. ▸ Lead by example in ensuring gender balance in the teams you lead, manage, control or influence. ▸ Mentor and Sponsor women in your organization. ▸ Further develop your empathy skills. ▸ Identify strategic male partners in a constructive dialogue about their own gender perspective.
  55. 55. SUSTAINABILITY ANCHOR GENDER PARTNERSHIP TO BUSINESS IMPERATIVES 5
  56. 56. • Engaging Men as Allies: Why and How – a 3-hour workshop with the Women’s ERG • Quarterly conference calls: To celebrate wins and coach on breakdowns. • Gender Partnership: What’s In It for Men? - Women's ERG-sponsored workshops for men to learn about Gender Partnership and the case for men as advocates for it. • Cross-Gender Communication: A “gender fishbowl” communication event to launch the next era of gender relations (the men in the event in number 3 above would be the prime audience for this event, and would be encouraged to bring other men as well) Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 •Enrollment of senior executives as advocates • Full engagement from the top leadership is the single most important factor in culture change. • Initial Engaging Men Workshop for senior executives followed by individual coaching and quarterly one-day refreshers to engage with what is working well, needs improvement.. • Enrollment of middle management through a process similar to that for senior executives. • Middle managers are where the rubber meets the road in terms of executing on the new culture of gender partnership. They will need to be fully engaged and given tools to create gender partnership in their teams, their relationships with each other, and to be role models for the organization. • Roll-out of the initiative to all levels of the organization through short workshops, webinars, brown- bag lunches, and internal communications efforts • Anchoring of inclusive leadership as a core value with creation of forums, structures, and processes to ensure sustainability of the new culture. A Foundation in Allies Leadership Buy-In Cultural Value SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP COMMITMENT COMMUNICATION IMPACT
  57. 57. THIS IS GREAT! HOW DO I INSTALL THIS PROGRAM?
  58. 58. I’M COMMITTED TO BEING YOUR ALLY
  59. 59. Top 8 Ways to Engage Men
 In Full Gender Partnership in Your Workplace If you are an organization or Team If you are a Woman If you are a Man who “Gets” it 1. Bring Men Together Use the men in your organization who “get” it to engage men who are still on the sidelines to get into the game. Ask each member of your women’s initiative to invite a male colleague to their next event. Tell men what’s in it for them, personally and professionally. 2. Have honest conversations about the impact of gender Start a men’s conversation. Share with employees, suppliers and investors the potential impact on the bottom line and stock value. Companies with fewer women in senior leadership positions are 48% less profitable and have a 37% lower return on equity. Include men in the conversation about the positive outcomes of full gender partnership. Ask men what it will take for them to be full gender partners. Explore the ways that women, with their innate tendency toward communication, collaboration and consensus-building, bring balance to work place traditions and attitudes. Read current thought leaders on the future of leadership. 3. Help men “get” that gender bias still exists Give your workforce the facts. For easy access to a multitude of statistics on the current state of gender bias at work, see Harvard Business Review’s: “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know About Women in the Workplace.” Share a story with your male mentor or sponsor from your personal experience, without blaming or shaming the people who made you feel “less than.” Encourage other men to ask the women in their lives - mother, wife, daughter, girlfriend, sisters, friends - if and how they have been affected by gender bias. 4. Engage men’s sense of fair play Set learning objectives for your training content that help men recognize the personal costs they suffer due to gender bias. Provide opportunities for self-reflection. Let men know the facts in your industry and in your company. Find the point of connection for your male colleagues and friends. Even if a man is unable or unwilling to see how unfair it is for him to have unreasonable advantages over his female colleagues, he may still be convinced to take action so his wife or daughters are not similarly shortchanged. 5. Encourage men in behaviors that are linked to awareness of gender bias Have influential managers, men who “get” it, play an integral role in inviting employees to participate in company efforts to increase gender awareness. Identify strategic male partners and engage them in a constructive dialogue about their own gender perspective. Lead by example by ensuring gender balance in the appointments and teams you manage, control, or influence. 6. Encourage men to champion and be architects of win-win outcomes. Use the men in your organization who “get” it to engage men who are still on the sidelines to get into the game. Ask each member of your women’s initiative to invite a male colleague to their next event. Tell men what’s in it for them, personally and professionally. 7. Engage men’s innate desire to take action Explore with groups of men and women where conformity to masculine norms is being rewarded at your company. Initiate exploratory win-win partnership conversations with men. Use inquiry based dialogue to find out what the win is for your male peer(s). Invest your time in mentoring women. 8. Attach accountability to actions to support productive business outcomes Establish compelling metrics, like time to promotion, retention, balance of gender in the leadership pipeline, and increase in female talent attraction. Evaluate the men you manage on their performance in building more balanced teams. Share with female colleagues your intention to be a partnership champion and ask how you can support them. This is how you can get
 Templates and Exercises Email me at: Dale@DaleThomasVaughn.com

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