Conversational Messages<br />Chapter 8<br />
Conversation is defined as “relatively informal social interaction in which the roles of speaker and hearer are exchanged ...
5<br />		S<br />			T		<br />				E<br />					P<br />						S<br />Conversation Process	<br />
The opening is equivalent to the greeting.  It sets the tone of the conversation.  Can be verbal (Hello.  How are you?) or...
Gives the other person a general idea of the conversation’s focus.  For example, “I’ve got to tell you about Jack…”<br />S...
The goal or subject of the conversation, fulfills on or several of the general purposes of interpersonal communication – t...
The purpose of feedback is to reflect back on the conversation to signal that business is complete.  It can be both critic...
This is the goodbye which often reveals how satisfied the persons were with the conversation.  <br />5) Closing<br />
Initiation – often accomplished by means of:<br />A)	Self Reference<br />B)	Other-references<br />C)	Relational References...
Definition – revealing information about yourself to others, usually information that is normally hidden.<br />Influenced ...
Formal communication in an organization directions include:<br />Upward – messages sent from lower to higher levels<br />D...
Prevention – use a disclaimer including hedging, credentialing, sin licenses, cognitive disclaimers, and appeals for the s...
DeVito, Joseph A. The Interpersonal 	Communication Book. Boston: Pearson 	Education, Inc., 2009. Print. <br />References:	...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Darcie Conner

327 views

Published on

DARCIE CONNER - YOU TEACH ASSIGNMENT

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Darcie Conner

  1. 1. Conversational Messages<br />Chapter 8<br />
  2. 2. Conversation is defined as “relatively informal social interaction in which the roles of speaker and hearer are exchanged in a nonautomatic fashion under the collaborative management of all parties” (McLaughlin, 1984).<br />Conversation – defined:<br />
  3. 3. 5<br /> S<br /> T <br /> E<br /> P<br /> S<br />Conversation Process <br />
  4. 4. The opening is equivalent to the greeting. It sets the tone of the conversation. Can be verbal (Hello. How are you?) or non-verbal (a smile, kiss, handshake).<br />1) Opening<br />
  5. 5. Gives the other person a general idea of the conversation’s focus. For example, “I’ve got to tell you about Jack…”<br />Serves 4 purposes: <br />Opens the channels of communication<br />Previews the message<br />Disclaims-won’t reflect negatively on you<br />Altercast-puts receiver in a specific role<br />2) Feedforward<br />
  6. 6. The goal or subject of the conversation, fulfills on or several of the general purposes of interpersonal communication – to learn, relate, influence, play or help. It is the main point of the conversation.<br />3) Business<br />
  7. 7. The purpose of feedback is to reflect back on the conversation to signal that business is complete. It can be both critical and/or supportive.<br />4) Feedback<br />
  8. 8. This is the goodbye which often reveals how satisfied the persons were with the conversation. <br />5) Closing<br />
  9. 9. Initiation – often accomplished by means of:<br />A) Self Reference<br />B) Other-references<br />C) Relational References<br />D) Context References<br />Conversational Management<br />
  10. 10. Definition – revealing information about yourself to others, usually information that is normally hidden.<br />Influenced by who you are, your culture, gender, listeners and topic and channel.<br />Rewards include: self-knowledge, coping ability, communication effectiveness, meaningfulness of relationships, and physiological health.<br />Dangers include: personal risks, relational risks, professional risks and irreversible communication.<br />In self-disclosure consider: motivation, appropriateness to person and context, reciprocal disclosure.<br />Responding to disclosure: listen, support, reinforce<br />Resist self-disclosure by being assertive and direct, or being indirect.<br />Conversational Disclosure:Revealing Yourself<br />
  11. 11. Formal communication in an organization directions include:<br />Upward – messages sent from lower to higher levels<br />Downward – messages sent from higher to lower levels<br />Lateral – messages between equals<br />Informal messages are oriented to individual members (grapevine messages)<br />Organizational Conversation<br />
  12. 12. Prevention – use a disclaimer including hedging, credentialing, sin licenses, cognitive disclaimers, and appeals for the suspension of judgement.<br />Repair – use an excuse or an explanation designed to lessen the negative impact of a speaker’s messages.<br />Conversational Problems:Prevention and Repair<br />
  13. 13. DeVito, Joseph A. The Interpersonal Communication Book. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc., 2009. Print. <br />References: <br />

×