Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Functionalist theory<br />Conflict theory <br />Symbolic/interactionist<br />Three Theories aboutYouth Crime<br />
Conflict Theory<br />Understands social groups by examining the underlying conflict<br />Sociologists want to understand t...
Consequences of conflict<br />Because these norms/values are not shared, one group seeks to dominate the others and seeks ...
Functionalist theory<br />Society is a system of many different parts (groups) that function together to achieve equilibri...
Consequences of strain<br />When the parts (systems) of the society are under strain (sometimes because of change), the go...
Evolution<br />Social systems evolve VERY SLOWLY and so change takes time<br />Functionalist theory focuses more on order ...
Agreement?<br />Both agree that shared values between groups are essential for a society’s health<br />CONFLICT: These val...
Explaining Crime<br />Conflict theory <br />Youth crime: an example of resistance to values they perceive as ‘forced’ upon...
Causes of CrimeConflictFunctionalist<br />Delinquency is a reaction of the  life condition of a person’s social class<br /...
ConflictFunctionalist<br />Youth crime is concentrated in lower classes because the ruling class sees their behaviour as d...
ConflictFunctionalist<br />Delinquency varies from society to society depending upon the political and economic structures...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Three Theories About

4,174 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Three Theories About

  1. 1. Functionalist theory<br />Conflict theory <br />Symbolic/interactionist<br />Three Theories aboutYouth Crime<br />
  2. 2. Conflict Theory<br />Understands social groups by examining the underlying conflict<br />Sociologists want to understand the power struggles between the groups<br />What causes it?<br />Assumption #1: society is composed of a variety of groups in conflict with each other and each group seeks to impose its own standards/rights/power/norms etc<br />Assumption #2: these norms/values are not shared<br />
  3. 3. Consequences of conflict<br />Because these norms/values are not shared, one group seeks to dominate the others and seeks to improve its standing at the expense of the other.<br />What examples can you think of?<br />If one group dominates, there will be peace and stability but this is imposed by force (or threat) to maintain this state.<br />
  4. 4. Functionalist theory<br />Society is a system of many different parts (groups) that function together to achieve equilibrium/harmony/stability/<br />Sometimes called the status quo<br />Think of your body where all organs must work together for a maximal state of health<br />When these systems (groups, institutions) work well, there is equilibrium <br />When they don’t there is strain and disharmony<br />
  5. 5. Consequences of strain<br />When the parts (systems) of the society are under strain (sometimes because of change), the goals of that society (think values) are not internalized by the individual.<br />Example: Canada, Quebec, Education Act, drop out rate, unemployment problems…<br />Example: Low voter participation rates<br />What are the values/goals that the ‘system’/society has that the individual is not internalizing?<br />
  6. 6. Evolution<br />Social systems evolve VERY SLOWLY and so change takes time<br />Functionalist theory focuses more on order and status quo than on change<br />Functionalist theory focuses on institutions that promote stability (education, churches, temples, government)<br />
  7. 7. Agreement?<br />Both agree that shared values between groups are essential for a society’s health<br />CONFLICT: These values are forced <br />FUNCTIONALIST: These values must be learned <br />Example: families, parents, children = mini societies<br />Youth crime: an example of resistance to values they perceive as ‘forced’ upon them<br />Rejection of mainstream values by the powerless and the minorities<br />
  8. 8. Explaining Crime<br />Conflict theory <br />Youth crime: an example of resistance to values they perceive as ‘forced’ upon them<br />Rejection of mainstream values by the powerless and the minorities<br />Functionalist theory<br />Values are poorly learned, youth + dysfunctional homes, poverty, mental illness, inadequate schools all contribute to creating this problem<br />
  9. 9. Causes of CrimeConflictFunctionalist<br />Delinquency is a reaction of the life condition of a person’s social class<br />People act in ways that suit their social position and power/powerlessness<br />We are a product of our class<br />What are the elements that make up someone’s class?<br />Delinquency is a result of individuals/groups not internalizing the shared values/norms/rules of their society.<br />Some absorb delinquent values.<br />
  10. 10. ConflictFunctionalist<br />Youth crime is concentrated in lower classes because the ruling class sees their behaviour as delinquent<br />More likely to be arrested because the ruling class has the power to do this and controls the police<br />Youth crime is concentrated in the poor because the institutions that are supposed to help are not effective and are dysfunctional<br />(families, schools, peers, neighbourhoods)<br />More likely to be arrested because they commit more crimes<br />
  11. 11. ConflictFunctionalist<br />Delinquency varies from society to society depending upon the political and economic structures of that society <br />Socialist societies have less crime because they have less social/class conflict<br />Delinquency is a constant feature in all societies<br />Capitalist and socialist both have the same rates of delinquency <br />

×