United States (American) People     Presented by: Al Lun, Savita Katarya        Values and Individualism          Religiou...
Values, individualism                        2
Cognitive Style• A sense of self-reliance and independence and  less attentive to global affairs 1• A sense of unique Amer...
Politics• Two-party system   – Democratic, Republican• Politics seldom get into conversations at work  but sometimes come ...
Service and Ruggedness• Volunteering and community service is common   – In both religious or non-religious volunteering  ...
Work-life balance• Super-mom  – I can do it all  – “Bring home the bacon, keep the house clean,    and take kids to soccer...
Time is Money                7
Value resiliency• Second chance  – In the United States, they believe in giving people a second    chance.  – Which explai...
Individualism                9
Individualism vs Collectivism• Americans are one of the most individualistic  peoples in the world  – Self-reliance, you a...
A Driven People• They have a general belief in limitless  opportunities  – Not satisfied with status quo  – Tend to show p...
Culture Dissonant• Al’s dad was often irritated that U. S. sales  clerk serve only one customer at a time and  made no att...
Ability to “sell” themselves• U. S. culture encourages citizens to declare  their worth and achievements without self-  co...
Sense of Humor• U. S. citizens favor people with a sense of  humor• Whether they are good at it or not, they will  attempt...
Value Systems• High emphasis on self-initiative and  achievement• In general, people from the United States do  not find i...
Minnesota Nice• Don’t complain• Small acts of courtesy are common and considered  good manners   – Keeping the door open f...
Minnesota Nice - continued Low context   • Compared to other cultures, not as much     socializing with colleagues after ...
Religious Expressions• First Amendment of the U. S. Constitution  guarantees free exercise of faiths.  – Separation of “ch...
Religious Expressions• Even though United States asserts separation of  Church and State, in many public functions it’s  c...
Judeo-Christian• Original U. S. Colonies were established by English  settlers who wished to practice their own religion  ...
Mega ChurchJoel Osteen               Lakewood Church, Houston, Texas               30,000 worshipers                      ...
Food and Table Manners                         22
Food choices• Many ethic choices which reflects the diverse nature  of the United States• American standards   – Family di...
Table Setting                24
Do’s and Don’ts• Say grace sometimes (depends on your host)• A toast maybe offered• Don’t start eating until everyone is s...
Dining Etiquette• "Dont talk with your mouth full”• Dont slurp (make loud sucking sound)                                  ...
Holidays• Halloween – October 31   – Trick-or-treating, dressed up in costumes• Thanksgiving – 4th Thursday in November   ...
Holidays (continued)•   New Year’s Day Jan. 1•   Martin Luther King Day Jan. 19•   Valentine’s day Feb 14•   Presidents’ d...
Lessons Learned                  29
Cocktail Party LI Ming came to the United States on a 6 month assignment. He was invited to a  Christmas Party at his col...
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3 values -relgious_expressions-_traditions_and_holiday021010

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Understanding United States Culture
3 values -relgious_expressions-_traditions_and_holiday

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  • Values and Individualism (Savita) Religious Expression (Al) Food and dining etiquette (Savita) Regional Differences with a focus on the Mid-West
  • Savita
  • AL: # Americans are normally ethnocentric and closed to most outside information # They have a high sense of the uniqueness of being American. And don't normally look to other countries as role models. But when clear deficiencies happen, they do accept outside information and techniques # Minimal long term orientation # They typically feel that they can do better. There is a sense of restless and expectations that next year should be better than this year. Only the recent economic downturn is causing some of them to re-examine the premise of speculating and risking. This explains why Americans don’t look to other countries for how they provide health care.
  • AL
  • SK: 1. Sports ... Americans are rugged     Many of them are excited about their children participate in school athletics programs.    At the right time, ask them about how their children are doing in sports.    That also explains the popular notions of hockey or soccer mom 2. Americans tend to be generous. They do a lot of volunteering work in churches, communities groups    - Might be interesting to compare stats with Asian countries ... my sense is that Americans tend to do more 3. A driven people:    - A belief in limitless opportunity makes Americans a driven people       -- Not satisfied with status quo, (eg. American Corp) always looking for more growth    - People who don't have a passion are somewhat suspect to Americans       -- Hyperactive and impatient ...           Need to show some examples from work ...    - At their best, they believe failure can be instructive and beneficial ....      Cicso Systems ... "If you hit five out of five, you won't do well here. People like that aren't take enough chances. "
  • SK
  • AL Business is done at lightning speed in comparion to many cultures. U.S. salespopel may bring final contracts to their first meeting with prospective clients.
  • AL: Politicians include Bill Clinton, Tom Delay, Richard Nison Celebrities include Martha Stewart,
  • Al
  • SK: Asians (Chinese and Indians) tend to value collectivism. Sense of harmony, don't rock the boat Americans on the other hand tend to value individualism. A sense of self-reliance, you are responsible for your own well being. In America, you can achieve anything if you set your mind to it. Please see Mark's references here:  http://rochesterhometeam.middlewaygroup.com/rctc-cultural-courses-folder/american-cultural-course-outline/individualism signed in as: demo  55901demo http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/intercultural/individualism.html At its best, Americans are: Optimistic, innovative--15% new jobs created and 15% jobs eliminated (google's Eric Schmidt) Google, Apple, Microsoft Also, explains bubbles Explains why America has the best higher education institutions in the world, researches, a lot of new inventions. very few countries can emulate   Also somewhat explains when foreign nationals (unable to prosper or start businesses in their own countries) start some of the most successful companies after they come to the US Silicon Valley Love credit, consumerism, low savings rate because they are risk takers Why Americans value individualism?   Meritocracy ... If you work hard, you will succeed.  Anyone can become rich, famous, or even the president of the United States Horatio Alger ... Many of Alger's works have been described as  rags to riches  stories, illustrating how down-and-out boys might be able to achieve the  American Dream  of wealth and success through hard work, courage, determination, and concern for others. This widely held view involves Alger's characters achieving extreme wealth and the subsequent remediation of their "old ghosts." Alger is noted as a significant figure in the history of American cultural and social ideals  
  • AL: A belief in limitless opportunity makes Americans a driven people       -- Not satisfied with status quo, (eg. American Corp) always looking for more growth    - People who don't have a passion are somewhat suspect to Americans       -- Hyperactive and impatient ...           Need to show some examples from work ...    - At their best, they believe failure can be instructive and beneficial ....      Cicso Systems ... "If you hit five out of five, you won't do well here. People like that aren't take enough chances. "
  • AL
  • SK: Chinese culture discourages self acknowledgement They tend to be self-conscious when they describe their own achievements
  • AL
  • SK
  • AL First settled by non-nonsense socialists from Germany, Sweden and Norway Planted corn Organized schools, libraries, churches, lodges, Don't complain much: * Mind your Manners, Be Useful, Pay Attention, Make Something of YOurself, Turn doew the Thermostat (If you're Gold, Go put on a sweater) * Don't think you are special Not uncomfortable with silences Minnesota nice
  • AL
  • SK
  • AL SK Even though US asserts: Separation of church and state, Americans tend toward being religious. Over 70% declare themselves as Christians. Protestants, Catholics and other denominations (Greek Orthodox, etc) There is religious freedom in America. People don't tend to talk about religion at work. International folks might feel odd that attending "public functions" Americans might start with a pledge of allegiance to the United States.   Pledge allegiance also has a reference to God. "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." A bit of contradiction given that there is separation of Church and State in the U.S. International professional would do well to accept this ritual and honor that part of the US Culture.  Stand and pay reverence and pay respect.
  • AL
  • AL
  • Savita
  • Food Choices Reflects the diverse nature of the United States. Ranging from American standards: There is an American expression: Meat and potato to indicate how common that is Need more .... A Informal meals (also called finger food) Hot Dog Hamburger   Also there are many ethnic varieties of all food Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese and many new combinations Indian Mexican Italian 
  • Bread or salad plates  are to the left of the main plate,  beverage glasses  are to the right. If small bread knives are present, lay them across the bread plate with the handle pointing to the right. A table cloth extending 10 to 15 inches past the edge of the table should be used for formal dinners, while placemats may be used for breakfast, luncheon, and informal suppers. [2] Modern etiquette provides the smallest numbers and types of utensils necessary for dining. Only utensils which are to be used for the planned meal should be set. Even if needed, hosts should not have more than three utensils on either side of the plate before a meal. If extra utensils are needed, they may be brought to the table along with later courses.  [3] If a salad course is served early in the meal, the salad fork should be further from the main course fork, both set on the left. If a soup is served, the spoon is set on the right, further from the plate than the knife. Dessert utensils, a small (such as salad) fork and teaspoon should be placed above the main plate horizontally (bowl of spoon facing left, the fork below with tines facing right), or more formally brought with the dessert. For convenience, restaurants and banquet halls may not adhere to these rules, instead setting a uniform complement of utensils at each seat. If a  wine glass and a water glass  are set, Wine glass is on the right directly above the knife.  Water glass is to the left of the wine glass at a 45 degree angle, closer to the diner. Glasses designed for certain types of wine may be set if available. If only one type of glass is available, it is considered correct regardless of the type of wine provided. Hosts should always provide  cloth napkins  to guests. When paper napkins are provided, they should be treated the same as cloth napkins, and therefore should not be balled up or torn. Napkin rings are only used for napkins which will be used repeatedly by members of the household, and therefore should never be used with a guest's napkin as they only receive freshly laundered ones. Napkins may be set on the plate, or to the left of the forks. Coffee or tea cups  are placed to the right of the table setting, or above the setting to the right if space is limited. The cup's handle should be pointing right. Candlesticks , even if not lit, should not be on the table while dining during daylight hours.  [4]  
  • SK Before Dining Mens' and unisex hats should never be worn at the table. Ladies' hats may be worn during the day if visiting others. [5] Before sitting down to a formal meal, gentlemen stand behind their chairs until the women are seated. A prayer or 'blessing' may be customary in some households, and the guests may join in or be respectfully silent. Most prayers are made by the host before the meal is eaten. Hosts should not practice an extended religious ritual in front of invited guests who have different beliefs. A toast may be offered instead of or in addition to a blessing. One does not start eating until (a) every person is served or (b) those who have not been served request that you begin without waiting. At more formal occasions all diners should be served at the same time and will wait until the hostess or host lifts a fork or spoon before beginning. Napkins are placed in the lap. At more formal occasions diners will wait to place their napkins on their laps until the host places his or her napkin on his or her lap. One waits until the host has picked up his or her fork or spoon before starting to eat. When eating very messy foods, such as barbecued ribs or crab, in an informal setting, where it must be eaten with the fingers and could cause flying food particles, a 'bib' or napkin tucked into the collar may be used by adults. Wet wipes or ample paper napkins should be provided to clean the hands. In formal settings, bibs or napkins used as such are improper, and food should be prepared by the chef so that it may be eaten properly with the provided utensils. Even if one has dietary restrictions, it is inappropriate for non-relatives to request food other than that which is being served by the host at a private function. 
  • AL
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  • SK
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  • 3 values -relgious_expressions-_traditions_and_holiday021010

    1. 1. United States (American) People Presented by: Al Lun, Savita Katarya Values and Individualism Religious Expression Food and dining etiquette Regional Differences with a focus on the Mid-West 1
    2. 2. Values, individualism 2
    3. 3. Cognitive Style• A sense of self-reliance and independence and less attentive to global affairs 1• A sense of unique American experience – Public Television program that shows achievements of Americans from various background and nationalities• Minimal long term orientation• A sense of motion and expectations – Next year should be better than this year1 Kiss, Bow, Or Shake Hands, Morrison and Conawy 3
    4. 4. Politics• Two-party system – Democratic, Republican• Politics seldom get into conversations at work but sometimes come up – Advice to international colleagues: You will do well just to listen and not take side 4
    5. 5. Service and Ruggedness• Volunteering and community service is common – In both religious or non-religious volunteering – Rotary, Kiwanis, Lion, Eagle – Many Churches sponsor charitable events and contributed by volunteers• Sense of participation and ruggedness – They are sports fans as well as sports participants – Parents are proud of their children playing sports • Parents coaching, “Hockey Mom”• Individualism 5
    6. 6. Work-life balance• Super-mom – I can do it all – “Bring home the bacon, keep the house clean, and take kids to soccer practices and music lessons 6
    7. 7. Time is Money 7
    8. 8. Value resiliency• Second chance – In the United States, they believe in giving people a second chance. – Which explains why many celebrities after going to jail or having been shamed come back out and appear in public Martha Stewart Michael Milken 8
    9. 9. Individualism 9
    10. 10. Individualism vs Collectivism• Americans are one of the most individualistic peoples in the world – Self-reliance, you are responsible for you own well being – Value entrepreneurship • Explains successful companies like Google, Apple• Meritocracy• Rags to riches stories 10
    11. 11. A Driven People• They have a general belief in limitless opportunities – Not satisfied with status quo – Tend to show passion – At their best, they view failures as lessons – They tend to give people a second chance• That culture when extended to American corporations explain why innovation and re- inventing oneself are valued 11
    12. 12. Culture Dissonant• Al’s dad was often irritated that U. S. sales clerk serve only one customer at a time and made no attempt to tell the waiting customers that they will be right with them• It might have come from Americans’ sense of fairness to individuals while Al’s dad (being Chinese) had the sense of collectivism and value the ability to pay attention to the needs of the collective 12
    13. 13. Ability to “sell” themselves• U. S. culture encourages citizens to declare their worth and achievements without self- consciousness – Friends often tell stories what they are good at, and what they have done. They tell their life stories quite comfortably, candidly and with authenticity – This does not mean they are arrogant. – They are just being honest 13
    14. 14. Sense of Humor• U. S. citizens favor people with a sense of humor• Whether they are good at it or not, they will attempt to tell jokes• When I first came to the United States, I felt out of place because I didn’t have any jokes to tell when some of my American of colleagues sometimes start the day or end the day telling the latest “knock-knock” jokes they heard 14
    15. 15. Value Systems• High emphasis on self-initiative and achievement• In general, people from the United States do not find it overly difficult to say “no.”• Strong work ethic (IBM Rochester is renown to be one of the hardest working labs)• They like to stay busy: gardening, wood- working, fixing their own cars, sewing• U. S. citizens are generally comfortable with risk 15
    16. 16. Minnesota Nice• Don’t complain• Small acts of courtesy are common and considered good manners – Keeping the door open for someone who is walking behind you. – Opening the door for someone – Let people come out of the elevators first before you rush in• Make quick eye contact, smiling to acknowledge some one, say good morning• Casual friendly, courteous, but not necessarily warm 16
    17. 17. Minnesota Nice - continued Low context • Compared to other cultures, not as much socializing with colleagues after work • They value privacy and individuality • Go their own way after work • Grown children do not typically live with their parents* However, IBM does have after-work sports leagues. Happy Hours for colleagues to get together are common. 17
    18. 18. Religious Expressions• First Amendment of the U. S. Constitution guarantees free exercise of faiths. – Separation of “church” and “state”• 76% of Americans identify themselves as Christians• 4% Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and others• 15% of adults not having any religion• There is an emerging trend toward interfaith 18
    19. 19. Religious Expressions• Even though United States asserts separation of Church and State, in many public functions it’s common to open with an invocation (a prayer) and close with a benediction – Inauguration of President of the United States – Sometimes even in what might be thought of as secular events such as Chamber of Commerce, it is common to start a meeting with an invocation – Pledge of allegiance is done in schools – This might surprise some international colleagues that come from a non-religious culture. 19
    20. 20. Judeo-Christian• Original U. S. Colonies were established by English settlers who wished to practice their own religion without discrimination• U. S. is a “Judeo-Christian” country – In God we trust … United States dollar bill – Pledge of allegiance – Work ethics – Faith-based charities – Good work• Very few elected politicians will say they belong to no religious faiths 20
    21. 21. Mega ChurchJoel Osteen Lakewood Church, Houston, Texas 30,000 worshipers 21
    22. 22. Food and Table Manners 22
    23. 23. Food choices• Many ethic choices which reflects the diverse nature of the United States• American standards – Family dinners – meat and potato• Finger food or fast food – Hot dot, hamburger, pizza, etc• Ethic food and a variation of their original recepe – Asian – South American, Mexican – European 23
    24. 24. Table Setting 24
    25. 25. Do’s and Don’ts• Say grace sometimes (depends on your host)• A toast maybe offered• Don’t start eating until everyone is served, or unless those have not been served request that you begin without waiting• Napkins are placed on the lap• Wait until the host has picked up his or her fork or spoon before starting to eat 25
    26. 26. Dining Etiquette• "Dont talk with your mouth full”• Dont slurp (make loud sucking sound) 26
    27. 27. Holidays• Halloween – October 31 – Trick-or-treating, dressed up in costumes• Thanksgiving – 4th Thursday in November – Turkey dinner, everyone comes home, biggest travelling day• Christmas – December 25 – Mixing religious, spiritual celebration with commercial activities – Respect other traditions and use the greeting of “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas”• Independence Day, July 4 27
    28. 28. Holidays (continued)• New Year’s Day Jan. 1• Martin Luther King Day Jan. 19• Valentine’s day Feb 14• Presidents’ day Feb16• Easter Sunday April 12• Mother’s Day second Sunday in May• Memorial Day May 25• Father’s Day 3rd Sunday in June• Independence Day July 4• Labor day September 7 28
    29. 29. Lessons Learned 29
    30. 30. Cocktail Party LI Ming came to the United States on a 6 month assignment. He was invited to a Christmas Party at his colleagues house. He was excited to go. Though worried that he didnt know too many people at the party, he remembered that in China the host will make sure that the guests are comfortable. When he did show up, ringing the door bell, someone who he didnt know open the door. He really couldnt see the host anywhere. In the house gathering were people standing or sitting having conversations. Everyone had a glass of wine or some other drinks. He felt a bit awful coming into the hall. Someone came up and introduced himself. LI Ming was still looking for the host, Steve. Steve finally showed up. He had been busy somewhere else in the house pouring drinks for other guests. Steve cheerfully greeted Li Ming and told him to make himself at home. Steve also introduced a couple of friends to Li Ming and then excused himself and disappeared. LI Ming felt really awkward about being there. 30

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