DI for SEED Math Teachers:
Parallel Tasks
Parallel Tasks
• Are sets of two or more related tasks designed
to meet the needs of pupils at different
developmental lev...
Meeting Pupils’ Needs
To meet each pupil’s needs, we need to
1) Provide tasks within each pupil’s zone of
proximal develop...
Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD)
ZPD is a term used to describe the “distance
between the actual development level as
de...
Instructions with Pupil’s ZPD
Through guidance from the teacher or working
with other students, ZPD allows pupils to acces...
To effectively differentiate instruction
1) Big Ideas
– Focus of instruction is on the big ideas being
taught to ensure th...
Big Ideas
Big ideas are mathematical statements of over-
aching concepts that are central to a
mathematical topic and link...
Principles to design Parallel Tasks
• Tasks created have variations that allow low
progress learners to be successful and ...
Reference
Small, M. (2009). Good questions: Great ways to differentiate
mathematics instruction. New York: Teachers Colleg...
Looking forward to meet you
in the face-to-face workshop
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DI for seed math teachers parallel tasks

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  • Teachers are not using the instructional time optimally if they are teaching either beyond a student’s ZPD or are providing instruction on material that the student already can handle independently. Student’s operating outside his or her ZPD is not benefitting from the instruction.
  • Thank you for your participation. You have provided insightful comments which we would bring back with us for further discussion.
  • DI for seed math teachers parallel tasks

    1. 1. DI for SEED Math Teachers: Parallel Tasks
    2. 2. Parallel Tasks • Are sets of two or more related tasks designed to meet the needs of pupils at different developmental levels • Address the same big idea and are close enough in context for the concepts to be discussed simultaneously in class. • Work within each pupil's zone of proximal development to supports pupils' engagement with the mathematical concepts Small, M. (2009). Good questions: Great ways to differentiate mathematics instruction. New York: Teachers College
    3. 3. Meeting Pupils’ Needs To meet each pupil’s needs, we need to 1) Provide tasks within each pupil’s zone of proximal development 2) Ensure that each pupil in the class has the opportunity to make a meaningful contribution during whole class discussion
    4. 4. Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) ZPD is a term used to describe the “distance between the actual development level as determined by independent problem solving and the level of potential development as determined through problem solving under adult guidance or in collaboration with more capable peers” (Vygotsky, 1978, p. 86)
    5. 5. Instructions with Pupil’s ZPD Through guidance from the teacher or working with other students, ZPD allows pupils to access new mathematical concepts that are close enough to what they already know to make the learning feasible.
    6. 6. To effectively differentiate instruction 1) Big Ideas – Focus of instruction is on the big ideas being taught to ensure that they all are addressed, no matter at what level 2. Choice – Some aspects of choice for the student in terms of content, process or product 3. Preassessment – Prior assessment is essential to determine what needs different students have (Gregory & Chapman, 2006; Murray & Jorgensen, 2007)
    7. 7. Big Ideas Big ideas are mathematical statements of over- aching concepts that are central to a mathematical topic and link numerous smaller mathematical ideas into a coherent whole.
    8. 8. Principles to design Parallel Tasks • Tasks created have variations that allow low progress learners to be successful and high progress learners to be challenged • Questions and tasks should be constructed in such a way that will allow all pupils to participate in the follow-up whole class discussions
    9. 9. Reference Small, M. (2009). Good questions: Great ways to differentiate mathematics instruction. New York: Teachers College Available in Read@Academy
    10. 10. Looking forward to meet you in the face-to-face workshop

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