Intropagepowerpt

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Intropagepowerpt

  1. 1. ENGLISH COMPOSITION 101 / Ris / Summer 2011<br />CRITICALREADING CRITICAL WRITING<br />
  2. 2. GOALS<br />The process of reading closely and thoughtfully can help you practice the following:<br /><ul><li>Recognizing relevant information
  3. 3. Prioritizing that information
  4. 4. Matching author strategies to purpose and audience</li></li></ul><li>Avoiding Distraction to Read More Closely<br /><ul><li>Choose your environment as one where reading can occur with the least amount of distractions
  5. 5. Less audio and visual input has been shown to facilitate retention of information</li></li></ul><li>Any Distractions Are Still Distractions<br />*<br />Food<br />Friends and Family<br />Pets<br />Worries<br />* In Germany, beer is part of a food group<br />
  6. 6. Annotating to Read Closely<br /><ul><li>Underline Important Words Or Responses To Questions
  7. 7. Circle Or Highlight Words Or Claims You Don’t Understand
  8. 8. Ask Questions Or Make Comments in the Margin
  9. 9. Add Notes That Make Connections With The Course, With Other Texts, And With Ideas About The Significance Of This Text</li></li></ul><li>WRITING RESPONSES<br />
  10. 10. Writing as Mountain Climbing<br /><ul><li>You may be uncertain about how to begin
  11. 11. The beginning may be easy, but the journey gets more difficult the further you go
  12. 12. You may feel that once you start, there’s no turning back
  13. 13. You can easily lose sight of your goal
  14. 14. It may feel like a very lonely venture
  15. 15. If you get lost, you may not know how to find your way back to known territory</li></li></ul><li>Getting Started<br /><ul><li>Start enough ahead of schedule that you can complete your work and have time for revision
  16. 16. Read the assignment carefully and know what you need to do
  17. 17. Take a few notes or outline your response to be sure you include the material requested</li></li></ul><li>Moving Ahead<br /><ul><li>Don’t be afraid to write “shitty first drafts” (see Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird)
  18. 18. Complete your draft and put it aside for an hour or more
  19. 19. Re-read your work. Is it:</li></ul> Complete?<br /> Well-stated?<br /> Responsive to the questions asked?<br />
  20. 20. Continuing the Journey<br />Make a wrong turn? <br /><ul><li>Remind yourself of your goal by re-reading the assignment
  21. 21. Recheck and/or modify your notes or outline to take into account new or changing goals
  22. 22. Remember that writing = thinking and new thoughts can be valuable</li></li></ul><li>Almost There!<br />
  23. 23. Completing the Journey<br /><ul><li>Print your work to read and revise a hard copy
  24. 24. Read it aloud: pay attention to sentences and movement from idea to idea
  25. 25. Have someone read it and tell you what you’re saying OR explain your goals and ask if you have achieved them
  26. 26. Revise or edit again, checking for focus, organization, support, and mechanics.</li></li></ul><li>Remember: It’s the Process<br /><ul><li>Be willing to continue to revise & re-vision (See the portfolio process, SG 25-26)
  27. 27. Help each other improve—saying everything is good doesn’t help us understand what needs work (see peer review, A&B 498-505)
  28. 28. Ask, and if you still don’t understand, ask again</li></li></ul><li>

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