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Why Train with Power? Why Train with Power? Bob McEnaney www.totalcyclingperformance.com Woodbury, MN
Topics <ul><li>What is Power? </li></ul><ul><li>How is it Measured? </li></ul><ul><li>Cycling Physiology </li></ul><ul><li...
Contributors Allen Lim, PhD Director of Education-Saris Cycling Group, Coach-Garmin-Slipstream Angie Sturtevant Director o...
What is Power? <ul><ul><li>Power  is simply the amount of mechanical  work  you can do in a given  time  frame. </li></ul>...
Cycling Power is Dynamic Torque x Cadence or Angular Velocity Push Harder Pedal   Faster or Power  at the  Hub  All the Fo...
Points of Reference <ul><li>1 horse power = 746 watts </li></ul><ul><li>A 68 kilogram (150 lb) rider with an 8.6 kg (19 lb...
Points of Reference For his World Hour Record in 1996, Chris Boardman averaged an estimated 442 W In setting a new women’s...
How is Power Measured?  <ul><li>Measures amount of force at rear hub, using strain gauges and speed of hub </li></ul><ul><...
Power is Energy 1 Kcal = 4.186 Kjoules Most humans are about 22-25% efficient on a bike, meaning only 22-25% of the kcals ...
Benefits of Training with Power <ul><li>Establish baselines </li></ul><ul><li>Gauge efforts and improvements </li></ul><ul...
Power Chart BASE Aerobic Conditioning THRESHOLD ANAEROBIC CONDITIONING MAX NEUROMUSCULAR 120:00 60:00 30:00 10:00 5:00 1:0...
Power vs. Heart Rate Holding Power Avg 175w Avg 150 HR Holding HR Avg 170w Avg 155 HR
“ The principles of training have not changed .” -Allen Lim
Principles of Training <ul><li>Specificity </li></ul><ul><li>Periodization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Overload </li></ul></ul><...
Stimulus vs. Response Stimulus / Cause Response/Effect Training Load  Performance Power
Positive Adaptation <ul><li>Training is a process of breaking down and rebuilding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gradually tax syst...
Progression <ul><li>Progression is the successive increase in overload </li></ul><ul><li>Cycles of increased work are foll...
Recovery <ul><li>Overload phase ends with an acute drop in performance, whereas the recovery phase ends with a restoration...
Individuality <ul><li>Everyone is different </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Training should reflect individual’s physiological syste...
Take the Power Test <ul><li>Determines threshold power </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Starting point for getting fitter </li></ul><...
Training Application <ul><li>Climbing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Warm Up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Zone 4 (225-275 watts) , 2x...
Questions?
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Power Training Presentation

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Cycle Power Training Presentation

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Power Training Presentation

  1. 1. Why Train with Power? Why Train with Power? Bob McEnaney www.totalcyclingperformance.com Woodbury, MN
  2. 2. Topics <ul><li>What is Power? </li></ul><ul><li>How is it Measured? </li></ul><ul><li>Cycling Physiology </li></ul><ul><li>Power vs. Heart Rate </li></ul><ul><li>Principles of Training with Power </li></ul><ul><li>Workout Examples </li></ul>
  3. 3. Contributors Allen Lim, PhD Director of Education-Saris Cycling Group, Coach-Garmin-Slipstream Angie Sturtevant Director of Fitness-Saris Cycling Group, Owner-Specialists in Sports Performance
  4. 4. What is Power? <ul><ul><li>Power is simply the amount of mechanical work you can do in a given time frame. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Cycling Power is Dynamic Torque x Cadence or Angular Velocity Push Harder Pedal Faster or Power at the Hub All the Forces Resisting Movement x Velocity For Bike & Rider
  6. 6. Points of Reference <ul><li>1 horse power = 746 watts </li></ul><ul><li>A 68 kilogram (150 lb) rider with an 8.6 kg (19 lb) bike at 20 mph on flat ground with no wind requires about 177 watts </li></ul><ul><li>56.5 W are required to press a 20 lb dumbbell 25 inches overhead in one second </li></ul><ul><li>Tour de France winners can generate 465 watts for over 30 minutes </li></ul>
  7. 7. Points of Reference For his World Hour Record in 1996, Chris Boardman averaged an estimated 442 W In setting a new women’s record of 54 minutes 2 seconds at the 2002 Mt. Washington (NH) Hillclimb, Geneviève Jeanson averaged an estimated 278 W (5.56 W/kg) Lance Armstong’s time of 38 minutes 1 second in climbing L’Alpe d’Huez during the 2001 Tour de France produced an estimate of 6.5 W/kg The best male match sprinters have hit 23 W/kg, females ~20 W/kg
  8. 8. How is Power Measured? <ul><li>Measures amount of force at rear hub, using strain gauges and speed of hub </li></ul><ul><li>Measures amount of torque exerted on pedals or rear hub multiplied by speed or angular velocity </li></ul>
  9. 9. Power is Energy 1 Kcal = 4.186 Kjoules Most humans are about 22-25% efficient on a bike, meaning only 22-25% of the kcals you burn actually goes into the bike, therefore: 4.186 Kjoules x .22 = 1 Kjoules Video
  10. 10. Benefits of Training with Power <ul><li>Establish baselines </li></ul><ul><li>Gauge efforts and improvements </li></ul><ul><li>Make comparisons </li></ul><ul><li>Quantify work </li></ul><ul><li>Determine ‘individuality’ </li></ul><ul><li>Keep training history </li></ul><ul><li>Work with coach </li></ul><ul><li>Implement stimulus/response </li></ul><ul><li>Determine work required for event or replenishment (KJ) </li></ul>
  11. 11. Power Chart BASE Aerobic Conditioning THRESHOLD ANAEROBIC CONDITIONING MAX NEUROMUSCULAR 120:00 60:00 30:00 10:00 5:00 1:00 :30 :05
  12. 12. Power vs. Heart Rate Holding Power Avg 175w Avg 150 HR Holding HR Avg 170w Avg 155 HR
  13. 13. “ The principles of training have not changed .” -Allen Lim
  14. 14. Principles of Training <ul><li>Specificity </li></ul><ul><li>Periodization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Overload </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recovery </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Individuality </li></ul>
  15. 15. Stimulus vs. Response Stimulus / Cause Response/Effect Training Load Performance Power
  16. 16. Positive Adaptation <ul><li>Training is a process of breaking down and rebuilding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gradually tax systems by working against load greater than used to </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Proper rest & nutrition </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Body programs systems to become stronger & develop stamina </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Negative Adaptation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Too much load/not enough rest & nutrition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not enough load/too much rest & nutrition </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Maximize Rate of Energy Production/Release Over Time without over-training </li></ul><ul><li>The absolute way to know  Measure & Monitor! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Everyone is an individual! </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Progression <ul><li>Progression is the successive increase in overload </li></ul><ul><li>Cycles of increased work are followed by reduced work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work can be increased by changing volume, intensity, or frequency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Increases in work should be small: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>10% rule </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Real life: performance goal vs. current performance vs. time frame </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Recovery <ul><li>Overload phase ends with an acute drop in performance, whereas the recovery phase ends with a restoration or increase in performance </li></ul><ul><li>Adaptive processes occur during the recovery phase (e.g., protein synthesis, restoration of homeostasis) </li></ul><ul><li>There is no such thing as overtraining, just under-resting </li></ul>
  19. 19. Individuality <ul><li>Everyone is different </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Training should reflect individual’s physiological systems & muscle fiber recruitment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Different responses take place at different intensities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Categorize and train these intensities (zones) relative to measurable markers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>By working zones, body responds to the specific demands </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adjust Training Zones based on changes in markers </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Take the Power Test <ul><li>Determines threshold power </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Starting point for getting fitter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Frame of reference for getting faster </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Measuring tool for going further </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sub-maximal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Honest perception of ‘hard’ </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Training Application <ul><li>Climbing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Warm Up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Zone 4 (225-275 watts) , 2x15 min on, 10 min off </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cool Down </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Faster </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Warm Up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Zone 5 (276-300 watts), 4x4 min on, 4 min off </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cool Down </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Endurance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Zone 2 (150-180 watts), 2 hours, 1,000 KJ </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Questions?

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