SlideShare a Scribd company logo

PHAC Knowledge Exchange Forum Nov 2010

This presentation offers a framework for social media to help enhance mass collaboration efforts or small group collaboration, especially when combined with practices of face-to-face communication. It was presented to a two-workshop sponsored by Canada\'s Public Health Agency.

1 of 12
Download to read offline
Knowledge Exchange Forum 2010
Finding the Middle Ground in a
Spectrum of Collaboration
Chateau Laurier /
Government Conference Centre
November 23 & 24, 2010
Christopher Wilson, Research Fellow,
Centre on Governance, University of Ottawa
A Practitioner’s View of
Collaboration
“Collaboration is an unnatural act between non-
consenting adults.”
– Former US Surgeon General, Jocelyn Elders
“We all say we want to collaborate, but what we
really mean is that we want to continue doing
things as we have always done them while
others change to fit what we are doing.”
Lessons from the Dancing Guy
Technology Spectrum of Social Collaboration
Mass Collaboration
100,000+
Small Group Collaboration
< 25
Culture of Sharing
Dissemination and exchange
Knowledge collaboration
High social learning
Shared ownership
Rigorous feedback & accountability
Innovation
Shared Commitment
New resources
Efficient implementations
Where to Find the Middle Ground?
Uses Social
Technologies
Slow start up
Relationships before action
High trust requirement
High partner monitoring
Tacit knowledge exchange
High customization
Team decision making
Smaller scale & exposure
Member dependent growth
Uses Physical
Technologies
Quick start up
Relationships after action
Low trust requirement
Low partner monitoring
Exchange of codifiable knowledge
High standardization
Un-centralized decision making
Greater scale & exposure
Viral growth
Partner Awareness Model
CommonGround
Context
Partner
Awareness
Complexity
Take Away
• Create a collaboration toolbox
– Use examples from the upcoming case learning
• Possible roles for government & social media to facilitate
collaboration
• Ask yourself:
– Where am I in this continuum between mass collaboration and
small group collaboration? Where do I think the balance should
be?
– Am I employing sufficient face-to-face communication?
– Are there social media tools that could bring others into our
conversation?
– Am I employing enough of the right practices?
• Then go home, experiment & become a connoisseur.
Ad

Recommended

How Network Orgs and Free Agents Are Reinvigorate Social Change
How Network Orgs and Free Agents Are Reinvigorate Social ChangeHow Network Orgs and Free Agents Are Reinvigorate Social Change
How Network Orgs and Free Agents Are Reinvigorate Social ChangeJason Mogus
 
Network effectiveness Surfrider
Network effectiveness SurfriderNetwork effectiveness Surfrider
Network effectiveness SurfriderChad Nelsen
 
iMedia December Agency Summit: Skills for 2011 Media Teams
iMedia December Agency Summit: Skills for 2011 Media TeamsiMedia December Agency Summit: Skills for 2011 Media Teams
iMedia December Agency Summit: Skills for 2011 Media TeamsiMedia Connection
 
How to succeed in the next decade
How to succeed in the next decadeHow to succeed in the next decade
How to succeed in the next decadeBatesHook
 
Panel 3. Delivering collaboration to ensure the deployment of CCS - Peta Ashw...
Panel 3. Delivering collaboration to ensure the deployment of CCS - Peta Ashw...Panel 3. Delivering collaboration to ensure the deployment of CCS - Peta Ashw...
Panel 3. Delivering collaboration to ensure the deployment of CCS - Peta Ashw...Global CCS Institute
 

More Related Content

What's hot

Networking your institution dc june 2013
Networking your institution dc june 2013Networking your institution dc june 2013
Networking your institution dc june 2013Jason Mogus
 
Adaptive strategic planning shifting from and ‘either-or’ to a ‘both-and’ app...
Adaptive strategic planning shifting from and ‘either-or’ to a ‘both-and’ app...Adaptive strategic planning shifting from and ‘either-or’ to a ‘both-and’ app...
Adaptive strategic planning shifting from and ‘either-or’ to a ‘both-and’ app...Chris Jansen
 
Transformative networking
Transformative networkingTransformative networking
Transformative networkingRoss Wirth
 
Social Media Week Sydney - Master Class Kai Riemer
Social Media Week Sydney - Master Class Kai RiemerSocial Media Week Sydney - Master Class Kai Riemer
Social Media Week Sydney - Master Class Kai RiemerKai Riemer
 
Covid-19 Webinar for Corporates: Rethinking Corporate Volunteering to support...
Covid-19 Webinar for Corporates: Rethinking Corporate Volunteering to support...Covid-19 Webinar for Corporates: Rethinking Corporate Volunteering to support...
Covid-19 Webinar for Corporates: Rethinking Corporate Volunteering to support...Empact
 
Knowledge sharing behavior
Knowledge sharing behaviorKnowledge sharing behavior
Knowledge sharing behaviorMaroua Zoghlemi
 
Social Networks for Social Change (WSP 166)
Social Networks for Social Change (WSP 166)Social Networks for Social Change (WSP 166)
Social Networks for Social Change (WSP 166)Working Wikily
 
DevOps Culture Level2 - IPExpo Manchester 2015
DevOps Culture Level2 - IPExpo Manchester 2015DevOps Culture Level2 - IPExpo Manchester 2015
DevOps Culture Level2 - IPExpo Manchester 2015Mandi Walls
 
Twyfords collaborative governance pathway; when business as usual is never li...
Twyfords collaborative governance pathway; when business as usual is never li...Twyfords collaborative governance pathway; when business as usual is never li...
Twyfords collaborative governance pathway; when business as usual is never li...Max Hardy
 
KMs Role in the Consumerization of IT
KMs Role in the Consumerization of ITKMs Role in the Consumerization of IT
KMs Role in the Consumerization of ITCurtis Conley
 
Achieving Collaboration in Matrixed Organizations
Achieving Collaboration in Matrixed OrganizationsAchieving Collaboration in Matrixed Organizations
Achieving Collaboration in Matrixed OrganizationsBhaskar Thyagarajan
 
Complexity, Change and Wellbeing
Complexity, Change and WellbeingComplexity, Change and Wellbeing
Complexity, Change and WellbeingMike Bell
 
Leading edge of democracy - IAP2 Australasia Leadership Forum
Leading edge of democracy - IAP2 Australasia Leadership ForumLeading edge of democracy - IAP2 Australasia Leadership Forum
Leading edge of democracy - IAP2 Australasia Leadership ForumMatt Leighninger
 
Spotlight on Innovation
Spotlight on InnovationSpotlight on Innovation
Spotlight on InnovationAdam Walz
 
Warwick Business School - Managing the digital workplace
Warwick Business School - Managing the digital workplaceWarwick Business School - Managing the digital workplace
Warwick Business School - Managing the digital workplaceLeon Benjamin
 

What's hot (19)

Networking your institution dc june 2013
Networking your institution dc june 2013Networking your institution dc june 2013
Networking your institution dc june 2013
 
Yai presentation final
Yai presentation finalYai presentation final
Yai presentation final
 
Adaptive strategic planning shifting from and ‘either-or’ to a ‘both-and’ app...
Adaptive strategic planning shifting from and ‘either-or’ to a ‘both-and’ app...Adaptive strategic planning shifting from and ‘either-or’ to a ‘both-and’ app...
Adaptive strategic planning shifting from and ‘either-or’ to a ‘both-and’ app...
 
Transformative networking
Transformative networkingTransformative networking
Transformative networking
 
Social Media Week Sydney - Master Class Kai Riemer
Social Media Week Sydney - Master Class Kai RiemerSocial Media Week Sydney - Master Class Kai Riemer
Social Media Week Sydney - Master Class Kai Riemer
 
Covid-19 Webinar for Corporates: Rethinking Corporate Volunteering to support...
Covid-19 Webinar for Corporates: Rethinking Corporate Volunteering to support...Covid-19 Webinar for Corporates: Rethinking Corporate Volunteering to support...
Covid-19 Webinar for Corporates: Rethinking Corporate Volunteering to support...
 
Catalysts for Social Innovation
Catalysts for Social InnovationCatalysts for Social Innovation
Catalysts for Social Innovation
 
Knowledge sharing behavior
Knowledge sharing behaviorKnowledge sharing behavior
Knowledge sharing behavior
 
Social Networks for Social Change (WSP 166)
Social Networks for Social Change (WSP 166)Social Networks for Social Change (WSP 166)
Social Networks for Social Change (WSP 166)
 
RWJF Basic Network Training
RWJF Basic Network TrainingRWJF Basic Network Training
RWJF Basic Network Training
 
DevOps Culture Level2 - IPExpo Manchester 2015
DevOps Culture Level2 - IPExpo Manchester 2015DevOps Culture Level2 - IPExpo Manchester 2015
DevOps Culture Level2 - IPExpo Manchester 2015
 
Twyfords collaborative governance pathway; when business as usual is never li...
Twyfords collaborative governance pathway; when business as usual is never li...Twyfords collaborative governance pathway; when business as usual is never li...
Twyfords collaborative governance pathway; when business as usual is never li...
 
KMs Role in the Consumerization of IT
KMs Role in the Consumerization of ITKMs Role in the Consumerization of IT
KMs Role in the Consumerization of IT
 
Achieving Collaboration in Matrixed Organizations
Achieving Collaboration in Matrixed OrganizationsAchieving Collaboration in Matrixed Organizations
Achieving Collaboration in Matrixed Organizations
 
Complexity, Change and Wellbeing
Complexity, Change and WellbeingComplexity, Change and Wellbeing
Complexity, Change and Wellbeing
 
Edges2
Edges2Edges2
Edges2
 
Leading edge of democracy - IAP2 Australasia Leadership Forum
Leading edge of democracy - IAP2 Australasia Leadership ForumLeading edge of democracy - IAP2 Australasia Leadership Forum
Leading edge of democracy - IAP2 Australasia Leadership Forum
 
Spotlight on Innovation
Spotlight on InnovationSpotlight on Innovation
Spotlight on Innovation
 
Warwick Business School - Managing the digital workplace
Warwick Business School - Managing the digital workplaceWarwick Business School - Managing the digital workplace
Warwick Business School - Managing the digital workplace
 

Similar to PHAC Knowledge Exchange Forum Nov 2010

Setting Up for Collaboration: Top Four Things to Keep in Mind
Setting Up for Collaboration: Top Four Things to Keep in MindSetting Up for Collaboration: Top Four Things to Keep in Mind
Setting Up for Collaboration: Top Four Things to Keep in MindChristopher Wilson
 
Babele - How to achieve collective intelligence
Babele - How to achieve collective intelligenceBabele - How to achieve collective intelligence
Babele - How to achieve collective intelligenceEmanuele Musa
 
Networkorgsreinvigoratesocialchangemay2012 120503062247-phpapp02
Networkorgsreinvigoratesocialchangemay2012 120503062247-phpapp02Networkorgsreinvigoratesocialchangemay2012 120503062247-phpapp02
Networkorgsreinvigoratesocialchangemay2012 120503062247-phpapp02Charles Lenchner
 
Adaptation education
Adaptation educationAdaptation education
Adaptation educationJude Horrill
 
Leading Change Intro
Leading Change IntroLeading Change Intro
Leading Change IntroAlex Moll
 
The Role of Entrepreneurs in Sustaining OSS Communities
The Role of Entrepreneurs in Sustaining OSS CommunitiesThe Role of Entrepreneurs in Sustaining OSS Communities
The Role of Entrepreneurs in Sustaining OSS CommunitiesRobin Teigland
 
Strategic futures workshop_20151005_final
Strategic futures workshop_20151005_finalStrategic futures workshop_20151005_final
Strategic futures workshop_20151005_finalWilliam Roberts
 
Social Innovation for a Network Society
Social Innovation for a Network SocietySocial Innovation for a Network Society
Social Innovation for a Network SocietyLondon Knowledge Lab
 
Sociocracy and Holacracy. A very different same
Sociocracy and Holacracy. A very different sameSociocracy and Holacracy. A very different same
Sociocracy and Holacracy. A very different sameEmanuele Quintarelli
 
Citizen Innovation Co Creating Social Resources, Smart Government Conf 2011
Citizen Innovation Co Creating Social Resources, Smart Government Conf 2011Citizen Innovation Co Creating Social Resources, Smart Government Conf 2011
Citizen Innovation Co Creating Social Resources, Smart Government Conf 2011Laura Sommer
 
BAS 115: Community Development 101
BAS 115: Community Development 101BAS 115: Community Development 101
BAS 115: Community Development 101Simon Poulton
 
Crowdsourcing strategy for NGOs and large complex organisations
Crowdsourcing strategy for NGOs and large complex organisationsCrowdsourcing strategy for NGOs and large complex organisations
Crowdsourcing strategy for NGOs and large complex organisationsCatherine Shovlin
 
dokumen.tips_theory-strategy-for-community-building.ppt
dokumen.tips_theory-strategy-for-community-building.pptdokumen.tips_theory-strategy-for-community-building.ppt
dokumen.tips_theory-strategy-for-community-building.pptYuchui1
 
Age NI Merger
Age NI MergerAge NI Merger
Age NI MergerNICVA
 
Communicating Vision and Value
Communicating Vision and ValueCommunicating Vision and Value
Communicating Vision and Value4Good.org
 
Honours lecture about leadership, crowdsourcing and social media
Honours lecture about leadership, crowdsourcing and social mediaHonours lecture about leadership, crowdsourcing and social media
Honours lecture about leadership, crowdsourcing and social mediaFrank Willems
 
Tues oct 23 am sector sustainability rob howarth english
Tues oct 23 am sector sustainability  rob howarth englishTues oct 23 am sector sustainability  rob howarth english
Tues oct 23 am sector sustainability rob howarth englishocasiconference
 
Adapting to complexity - critical practices for human networks
Adapting to complexity - critical practices for human networksAdapting to complexity - critical practices for human networks
Adapting to complexity - critical practices for human networksCatherine Shinners
 

Similar to PHAC Knowledge Exchange Forum Nov 2010 (20)

Setting Up for Collaboration: Top Four Things to Keep in Mind
Setting Up for Collaboration: Top Four Things to Keep in MindSetting Up for Collaboration: Top Four Things to Keep in Mind
Setting Up for Collaboration: Top Four Things to Keep in Mind
 
Innovation culture
Innovation cultureInnovation culture
Innovation culture
 
Babele - How to achieve collective intelligence
Babele - How to achieve collective intelligenceBabele - How to achieve collective intelligence
Babele - How to achieve collective intelligence
 
Social Media in Government
Social Media in GovernmentSocial Media in Government
Social Media in Government
 
Networkorgsreinvigoratesocialchangemay2012 120503062247-phpapp02
Networkorgsreinvigoratesocialchangemay2012 120503062247-phpapp02Networkorgsreinvigoratesocialchangemay2012 120503062247-phpapp02
Networkorgsreinvigoratesocialchangemay2012 120503062247-phpapp02
 
Adaptation education
Adaptation educationAdaptation education
Adaptation education
 
Leading Change Intro
Leading Change IntroLeading Change Intro
Leading Change Intro
 
The Role of Entrepreneurs in Sustaining OSS Communities
The Role of Entrepreneurs in Sustaining OSS CommunitiesThe Role of Entrepreneurs in Sustaining OSS Communities
The Role of Entrepreneurs in Sustaining OSS Communities
 
Strategic futures workshop_20151005_final
Strategic futures workshop_20151005_finalStrategic futures workshop_20151005_final
Strategic futures workshop_20151005_final
 
Social Innovation for a Network Society
Social Innovation for a Network SocietySocial Innovation for a Network Society
Social Innovation for a Network Society
 
Sociocracy and Holacracy. A very different same
Sociocracy and Holacracy. A very different sameSociocracy and Holacracy. A very different same
Sociocracy and Holacracy. A very different same
 
Citizen Innovation Co Creating Social Resources, Smart Government Conf 2011
Citizen Innovation Co Creating Social Resources, Smart Government Conf 2011Citizen Innovation Co Creating Social Resources, Smart Government Conf 2011
Citizen Innovation Co Creating Social Resources, Smart Government Conf 2011
 
BAS 115: Community Development 101
BAS 115: Community Development 101BAS 115: Community Development 101
BAS 115: Community Development 101
 
Crowdsourcing strategy for NGOs and large complex organisations
Crowdsourcing strategy for NGOs and large complex organisationsCrowdsourcing strategy for NGOs and large complex organisations
Crowdsourcing strategy for NGOs and large complex organisations
 
dokumen.tips_theory-strategy-for-community-building.ppt
dokumen.tips_theory-strategy-for-community-building.pptdokumen.tips_theory-strategy-for-community-building.ppt
dokumen.tips_theory-strategy-for-community-building.ppt
 
Age NI Merger
Age NI MergerAge NI Merger
Age NI Merger
 
Communicating Vision and Value
Communicating Vision and ValueCommunicating Vision and Value
Communicating Vision and Value
 
Honours lecture about leadership, crowdsourcing and social media
Honours lecture about leadership, crowdsourcing and social mediaHonours lecture about leadership, crowdsourcing and social media
Honours lecture about leadership, crowdsourcing and social media
 
Tues oct 23 am sector sustainability rob howarth english
Tues oct 23 am sector sustainability  rob howarth englishTues oct 23 am sector sustainability  rob howarth english
Tues oct 23 am sector sustainability rob howarth english
 
Adapting to complexity - critical practices for human networks
Adapting to complexity - critical practices for human networksAdapting to complexity - critical practices for human networks
Adapting to complexity - critical practices for human networks
 

More from Christopher Wilson

Time for a new paradigm of government
Time for a new paradigm of governmentTime for a new paradigm of government
Time for a new paradigm of governmentChristopher Wilson
 
Intelligent Governance: An Alternative Paradigm
Intelligent Governance: An Alternative ParadigmIntelligent Governance: An Alternative Paradigm
Intelligent Governance: An Alternative ParadigmChristopher Wilson
 
Not anti government but irrelevant government
Not anti government but irrelevant governmentNot anti government but irrelevant government
Not anti government but irrelevant governmentChristopher Wilson
 
The Internet Will Make Governments Unrecognizable
The Internet Will Make Governments UnrecognizableThe Internet Will Make Governments Unrecognizable
The Internet Will Make Governments UnrecognizableChristopher Wilson
 
From leadership to stewardship
From leadership to stewardshipFrom leadership to stewardship
From leadership to stewardshipChristopher Wilson
 
Mechanisms of Collaboration and Engagement
Mechanisms of Collaboration and EngagementMechanisms of Collaboration and Engagement
Mechanisms of Collaboration and EngagementChristopher Wilson
 
Developmental evaluation learning as you go
Developmental evaluation learning as you goDevelopmental evaluation learning as you go
Developmental evaluation learning as you goChristopher Wilson
 
Metaphors, biases & learning partnerships
Metaphors, biases & learning partnerships Metaphors, biases & learning partnerships
Metaphors, biases & learning partnerships Christopher Wilson
 
Complexity, risk and collaboration
Complexity, risk and collaborationComplexity, risk and collaboration
Complexity, risk and collaborationChristopher Wilson
 

More from Christopher Wilson (12)

Time for a new paradigm of government
Time for a new paradigm of governmentTime for a new paradigm of government
Time for a new paradigm of government
 
Reimagining Global Governance
Reimagining  Global GovernanceReimagining  Global Governance
Reimagining Global Governance
 
Intelligent Governance: An Alternative Paradigm
Intelligent Governance: An Alternative ParadigmIntelligent Governance: An Alternative Paradigm
Intelligent Governance: An Alternative Paradigm
 
Not anti government but irrelevant government
Not anti government but irrelevant governmentNot anti government but irrelevant government
Not anti government but irrelevant government
 
Re-imagining Government
Re-imagining GovernmentRe-imagining Government
Re-imagining Government
 
The Internet Will Make Governments Unrecognizable
The Internet Will Make Governments UnrecognizableThe Internet Will Make Governments Unrecognizable
The Internet Will Make Governments Unrecognizable
 
From leadership to stewardship
From leadership to stewardshipFrom leadership to stewardship
From leadership to stewardship
 
Mechanisms of Collaboration and Engagement
Mechanisms of Collaboration and EngagementMechanisms of Collaboration and Engagement
Mechanisms of Collaboration and Engagement
 
Developmental evaluation learning as you go
Developmental evaluation learning as you goDevelopmental evaluation learning as you go
Developmental evaluation learning as you go
 
Metaphors, biases & learning partnerships
Metaphors, biases & learning partnerships Metaphors, biases & learning partnerships
Metaphors, biases & learning partnerships
 
Complexity, risk and collaboration
Complexity, risk and collaborationComplexity, risk and collaboration
Complexity, risk and collaboration
 
The Community We Want
The Community We WantThe Community We Want
The Community We Want
 

Recently uploaded

Automation Ops Series: Session 1 - Introduction and setup DevOps for UiPath p...
Automation Ops Series: Session 1 - Introduction and setup DevOps for UiPath p...Automation Ops Series: Session 1 - Introduction and setup DevOps for UiPath p...
Automation Ops Series: Session 1 - Introduction and setup DevOps for UiPath p...DianaGray10
 
"AIRe - AI Reliability Engineering", Denys Vasyliev
"AIRe - AI Reliability Engineering", Denys Vasyliev"AIRe - AI Reliability Engineering", Denys Vasyliev
"AIRe - AI Reliability Engineering", Denys VasylievFwdays
 
Confoo 2024 Gettings started with OpenAI and data science
Confoo 2024 Gettings started with OpenAI and data scienceConfoo 2024 Gettings started with OpenAI and data science
Confoo 2024 Gettings started with OpenAI and data scienceSusan Ibach
 
Importance of magazines in education ppt
Importance of magazines in education pptImportance of magazines in education ppt
Importance of magazines in education pptsafnarafeek2002
 
Introducing the New FME Community Webinar - Feb 21, 2024 (2).pdf
Introducing the New FME Community Webinar - Feb 21, 2024 (2).pdfIntroducing the New FME Community Webinar - Feb 21, 2024 (2).pdf
Introducing the New FME Community Webinar - Feb 21, 2024 (2).pdfSafe Software
 
Bringing nullability into existing code - dammit is not the answer.pptx
Bringing nullability into existing code - dammit is not the answer.pptxBringing nullability into existing code - dammit is not the answer.pptx
Bringing nullability into existing code - dammit is not the answer.pptxMaarten Balliauw
 
Enhancing Productivity and Insight A Tour of JDK Tools Progress Beyond Java 17
Enhancing Productivity and Insight  A Tour of JDK Tools Progress Beyond Java 17Enhancing Productivity and Insight  A Tour of JDK Tools Progress Beyond Java 17
Enhancing Productivity and Insight A Tour of JDK Tools Progress Beyond Java 17Ana-Maria Mihalceanu
 
Act Like an Owner, Challenge Like a VC by former CPO, Tripadvisor
Act Like an Owner,  Challenge Like a VC by former CPO, TripadvisorAct Like an Owner,  Challenge Like a VC by former CPO, Tripadvisor
Act Like an Owner, Challenge Like a VC by former CPO, TripadvisorProduct School
 
Dev Dives: Leverage APIs and Gen AI to power automations for RPA and software...
Dev Dives: Leverage APIs and Gen AI to power automations for RPA and software...Dev Dives: Leverage APIs and Gen AI to power automations for RPA and software...
Dev Dives: Leverage APIs and Gen AI to power automations for RPA and software...UiPathCommunity
 
Campotel: Telecommunications Infra and Network Builder - Company Profile
Campotel: Telecommunications Infra and Network Builder - Company ProfileCampotel: Telecommunications Infra and Network Builder - Company Profile
Campotel: Telecommunications Infra and Network Builder - Company ProfileCampotelPhilippines
 
Leveraging SLF4j for Effective Logging in IBM App Connect Enterprise.docx
Leveraging SLF4j for Effective Logging in IBM App Connect Enterprise.docxLeveraging SLF4j for Effective Logging in IBM App Connect Enterprise.docx
Leveraging SLF4j for Effective Logging in IBM App Connect Enterprise.docxVotarikari Shravan
 
Battle of React State Managers in frontend applications
Battle of React State Managers in frontend applicationsBattle of React State Managers in frontend applications
Battle of React State Managers in frontend applicationsEvangelia Mitsopoulou
 
From Challenger to Champion: How SpiraPlan Outperforms JIRA+Plugins
From Challenger to Champion: How SpiraPlan Outperforms JIRA+PluginsFrom Challenger to Champion: How SpiraPlan Outperforms JIRA+Plugins
From Challenger to Champion: How SpiraPlan Outperforms JIRA+PluginsInflectra
 
Synergy in Leadership and Product Excellence: A Blueprint for Growth by CPO, ...
Synergy in Leadership and Product Excellence: A Blueprint for Growth by CPO, ...Synergy in Leadership and Product Excellence: A Blueprint for Growth by CPO, ...
Synergy in Leadership and Product Excellence: A Blueprint for Growth by CPO, ...Product School
 
Digital Transformation Strategy & Plan Templates - www.beyondthecloud.digital...
Digital Transformation Strategy & Plan Templates - www.beyondthecloud.digital...Digital Transformation Strategy & Plan Templates - www.beyondthecloud.digital...
Digital Transformation Strategy & Plan Templates - www.beyondthecloud.digital...MarcovanHurne2
 
Artificial-Intelligence-in-Marketing-Data.pdf
Artificial-Intelligence-in-Marketing-Data.pdfArtificial-Intelligence-in-Marketing-Data.pdf
Artificial-Intelligence-in-Marketing-Data.pdfIsidro Navarro
 
How AI and ChatGPT are changing cybersecurity forever.pptx
How AI and ChatGPT are changing cybersecurity forever.pptxHow AI and ChatGPT are changing cybersecurity forever.pptx
How AI and ChatGPT are changing cybersecurity forever.pptxInfosec
 
Are Human-generated Demonstrations Necessary for In-context Learning?
Are Human-generated Demonstrations Necessary for In-context Learning?Are Human-generated Demonstrations Necessary for In-context Learning?
Are Human-generated Demonstrations Necessary for In-context Learning?MENGSAYLOEM1
 
Introduction to Multimodal LLMs with LLaVA
Introduction to Multimodal LLMs with LLaVAIntroduction to Multimodal LLMs with LLaVA
Introduction to Multimodal LLMs with LLaVARobert McDermott
 
Early Tech Adoption: Foolish or Pragmatic? - 17th ISACA South Florida WOW Con...
Early Tech Adoption: Foolish or Pragmatic? - 17th ISACA South Florida WOW Con...Early Tech Adoption: Foolish or Pragmatic? - 17th ISACA South Florida WOW Con...
Early Tech Adoption: Foolish or Pragmatic? - 17th ISACA South Florida WOW Con...Adrian Sanabria
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Automation Ops Series: Session 1 - Introduction and setup DevOps for UiPath p...
Automation Ops Series: Session 1 - Introduction and setup DevOps for UiPath p...Automation Ops Series: Session 1 - Introduction and setup DevOps for UiPath p...
Automation Ops Series: Session 1 - Introduction and setup DevOps for UiPath p...
 
"AIRe - AI Reliability Engineering", Denys Vasyliev
"AIRe - AI Reliability Engineering", Denys Vasyliev"AIRe - AI Reliability Engineering", Denys Vasyliev
"AIRe - AI Reliability Engineering", Denys Vasyliev
 
Confoo 2024 Gettings started with OpenAI and data science
Confoo 2024 Gettings started with OpenAI and data scienceConfoo 2024 Gettings started with OpenAI and data science
Confoo 2024 Gettings started with OpenAI and data science
 
Importance of magazines in education ppt
Importance of magazines in education pptImportance of magazines in education ppt
Importance of magazines in education ppt
 
Introducing the New FME Community Webinar - Feb 21, 2024 (2).pdf
Introducing the New FME Community Webinar - Feb 21, 2024 (2).pdfIntroducing the New FME Community Webinar - Feb 21, 2024 (2).pdf
Introducing the New FME Community Webinar - Feb 21, 2024 (2).pdf
 
Bringing nullability into existing code - dammit is not the answer.pptx
Bringing nullability into existing code - dammit is not the answer.pptxBringing nullability into existing code - dammit is not the answer.pptx
Bringing nullability into existing code - dammit is not the answer.pptx
 
Enhancing Productivity and Insight A Tour of JDK Tools Progress Beyond Java 17
Enhancing Productivity and Insight  A Tour of JDK Tools Progress Beyond Java 17Enhancing Productivity and Insight  A Tour of JDK Tools Progress Beyond Java 17
Enhancing Productivity and Insight A Tour of JDK Tools Progress Beyond Java 17
 
Act Like an Owner, Challenge Like a VC by former CPO, Tripadvisor
Act Like an Owner,  Challenge Like a VC by former CPO, TripadvisorAct Like an Owner,  Challenge Like a VC by former CPO, Tripadvisor
Act Like an Owner, Challenge Like a VC by former CPO, Tripadvisor
 
Dev Dives: Leverage APIs and Gen AI to power automations for RPA and software...
Dev Dives: Leverage APIs and Gen AI to power automations for RPA and software...Dev Dives: Leverage APIs and Gen AI to power automations for RPA and software...
Dev Dives: Leverage APIs and Gen AI to power automations for RPA and software...
 
Campotel: Telecommunications Infra and Network Builder - Company Profile
Campotel: Telecommunications Infra and Network Builder - Company ProfileCampotel: Telecommunications Infra and Network Builder - Company Profile
Campotel: Telecommunications Infra and Network Builder - Company Profile
 
Leveraging SLF4j for Effective Logging in IBM App Connect Enterprise.docx
Leveraging SLF4j for Effective Logging in IBM App Connect Enterprise.docxLeveraging SLF4j for Effective Logging in IBM App Connect Enterprise.docx
Leveraging SLF4j for Effective Logging in IBM App Connect Enterprise.docx
 
Battle of React State Managers in frontend applications
Battle of React State Managers in frontend applicationsBattle of React State Managers in frontend applications
Battle of React State Managers in frontend applications
 
From Challenger to Champion: How SpiraPlan Outperforms JIRA+Plugins
From Challenger to Champion: How SpiraPlan Outperforms JIRA+PluginsFrom Challenger to Champion: How SpiraPlan Outperforms JIRA+Plugins
From Challenger to Champion: How SpiraPlan Outperforms JIRA+Plugins
 
Synergy in Leadership and Product Excellence: A Blueprint for Growth by CPO, ...
Synergy in Leadership and Product Excellence: A Blueprint for Growth by CPO, ...Synergy in Leadership and Product Excellence: A Blueprint for Growth by CPO, ...
Synergy in Leadership and Product Excellence: A Blueprint for Growth by CPO, ...
 
Digital Transformation Strategy & Plan Templates - www.beyondthecloud.digital...
Digital Transformation Strategy & Plan Templates - www.beyondthecloud.digital...Digital Transformation Strategy & Plan Templates - www.beyondthecloud.digital...
Digital Transformation Strategy & Plan Templates - www.beyondthecloud.digital...
 
Artificial-Intelligence-in-Marketing-Data.pdf
Artificial-Intelligence-in-Marketing-Data.pdfArtificial-Intelligence-in-Marketing-Data.pdf
Artificial-Intelligence-in-Marketing-Data.pdf
 
How AI and ChatGPT are changing cybersecurity forever.pptx
How AI and ChatGPT are changing cybersecurity forever.pptxHow AI and ChatGPT are changing cybersecurity forever.pptx
How AI and ChatGPT are changing cybersecurity forever.pptx
 
Are Human-generated Demonstrations Necessary for In-context Learning?
Are Human-generated Demonstrations Necessary for In-context Learning?Are Human-generated Demonstrations Necessary for In-context Learning?
Are Human-generated Demonstrations Necessary for In-context Learning?
 
Introduction to Multimodal LLMs with LLaVA
Introduction to Multimodal LLMs with LLaVAIntroduction to Multimodal LLMs with LLaVA
Introduction to Multimodal LLMs with LLaVA
 
Early Tech Adoption: Foolish or Pragmatic? - 17th ISACA South Florida WOW Con...
Early Tech Adoption: Foolish or Pragmatic? - 17th ISACA South Florida WOW Con...Early Tech Adoption: Foolish or Pragmatic? - 17th ISACA South Florida WOW Con...
Early Tech Adoption: Foolish or Pragmatic? - 17th ISACA South Florida WOW Con...
 

PHAC Knowledge Exchange Forum Nov 2010

  • 1. Knowledge Exchange Forum 2010 Finding the Middle Ground in a Spectrum of Collaboration Chateau Laurier / Government Conference Centre November 23 & 24, 2010 Christopher Wilson, Research Fellow, Centre on Governance, University of Ottawa
  • 2. A Practitioner’s View of Collaboration “Collaboration is an unnatural act between non- consenting adults.” – Former US Surgeon General, Jocelyn Elders “We all say we want to collaborate, but what we really mean is that we want to continue doing things as we have always done them while others change to fit what we are doing.”
  • 3. Lessons from the Dancing Guy
  • 4. Technology Spectrum of Social Collaboration Mass Collaboration 100,000+ Small Group Collaboration < 25 Culture of Sharing Dissemination and exchange Knowledge collaboration High social learning Shared ownership Rigorous feedback & accountability Innovation Shared Commitment New resources Efficient implementations Where to Find the Middle Ground? Uses Social Technologies Slow start up Relationships before action High trust requirement High partner monitoring Tacit knowledge exchange High customization Team decision making Smaller scale & exposure Member dependent growth Uses Physical Technologies Quick start up Relationships after action Low trust requirement Low partner monitoring Exchange of codifiable knowledge High standardization Un-centralized decision making Greater scale & exposure Viral growth
  • 6. Take Away • Create a collaboration toolbox – Use examples from the upcoming case learning • Possible roles for government & social media to facilitate collaboration • Ask yourself: – Where am I in this continuum between mass collaboration and small group collaboration? Where do I think the balance should be? – Am I employing sufficient face-to-face communication? – Are there social media tools that could bring others into our conversation? – Am I employing enough of the right practices? • Then go home, experiment & become a connoisseur.
  • 7. Thank You Christopher Wilson Centre on Governance Email: wilson@telfer.uottawa.ca Tel: 613-355-6505
  • 8. Resources • Us Now – A film by director Ivo Gormley about mass collaboration • Howard Rheingold on collaboration – Howard Rheingold talks about the emerging world of collaboration, participatory media and collective action. • How cooperation (eventually) trumps conflict – Author Robert Wright presents at TED & explains how "non-zero-sumness," -- a game-theory term for cooperation -- is the chief distinguishing feature of human evolution.
  • 9. Key Practice Areas for Mass Collaboration • Use minimal rules • Engagement • Self-organization & Ownership • Awareness • Coordination (instead of control) • Exchange Practices for Codifiable Knowledge
  • 10. Key Practice Areas for Small Group Collaboration • Dating • Engagement • Trust Building • Meeting Design • Governance • Operations • Social Learning • Information Dissemination
  • 11. Potential Roles • Government – Independent stakeholder involved in knowledge creation, service deliverer, regulator, policy developer. (Standard) – Convener (particularly for face-to-face interactions)? – Partnership broker? – Facilitating partner awareness? – Collaboration support? • Social media – As a record of stakeholder engagement? – As a record of subject-matter information & collective learning? – As a record of collaboration support information?
  • 12. Complexity Increases with Increases in the Number of Risks and Uncertainties IssueIssue ComplexityComplexity Context Technology Resources Business Action Interdependence Political Stakeholders Knowledge Shared Goals Work coupling Time

Editor's Notes

  1. I’d like to begin by saying the purpose of social media is not to use social media. The purpose of social media is to connect people so that we can share our interests, ideas, goals, work, and achievements. If the experience doesn’t lead to real people interacting and working together in some way, it might as well be cheap reality TV. [click]
  2. With that in mind, let me offer a quote from former US Surgeon General, Jocelyn Elders. [click] She says “Collaboration is an unnatural act between non-consenting adults.” For all those who’ve tried their hand at collaboration, her comment is all too familiar. It captures our frustration with the need to work together in the first place and our unfamiliarity with the tools and practices that might make it ‘natural’ for us. Elders then continues by naming the taboo assumption we almost all share when we enter a room with potential partners: she says, (click) “We all say we want to collaborate, but what we really mean is that we want to continue doing things as we have always done them while others change to fit what we are doing.” We know we can’t do things by ourselves – that’s why we’re willing to engage in this un-natural act. But convinced as we are of the completeness of our understanding and the ‘rightness’ of our proposed actions, our expectations are that others, once persuaded of our wisdom, will automatically adjust themselves to accommodate us. Unfortunately, this delusion is one we almost all share. Collaboration is generally perceived as hard, time consuming, unfocused and risky. It puts people in situations of potential conflict. It may also suffer from big egos and free-loaders. So why do it unless you absolutely have to? The answer is quite simple – more &amp; more you absolutely have to. [click]
  3. I believe Elders’ suggestion that collaboration is not natural is wrong, as this Youtube video illustrates [click]: It begins with someone making a choice – this is the social innovator who sets a new direction -- and he’s unafraid to look stupid. This is his real contribution, his willingness to risk standing out from the crowd. As you can see, there’s lot’s of people looking on but afraid to take this risk. Then someone else makes the same choice, and the two support each other. It’s not about one or the other. It’s all about the work together and the work is energizing. The second person is taking a big risk too but he’s also demonstrating that there is no barrier to making that choice. Without this second person we’d only ever have the one Lone Nut. The two then try bringing in others. Here comes the third person. This is the tipping point because we all know that three’s a crowd. Three is suddenly the cool fringe. Now here are two more and then three more. We’ve got momentum now and things are taking off. Now it’s OK for people to feel comfortable in their choice to join in. They don’t have to feel any sense of social sanction for acting crazy. The sole entry barrier has collapsed. Now we’ve got a movement. As we see more and more people join in, the whole thing goes viral. Now there’s no risk in joining, in fact not joining can be seen as being anti-social. So let’s recap what we saw: We saw one person making a choice. We might refer to him as the leader and he may get the credit for starting the whole thing but we know what we saw. It was the second person that really made the difference between a lone nut and a collaboration. He was the one who showed that there was no penalty in making that choice and that anyone could join in. Leadership didn’t matter much, except to support those people coming in. What we didn’t see is persuasion, goal setting, negotiation, coercion or getting buy-in. The work, the energy of collaborating was its own reward. And, as the risk of standing out was lowered, people did join in -- in droves. Even complete strangers. In under 3 minutes we saw a lone nut transformed into a large collaboration. So much for collaboration being an un-natural act. [Click off web] So how do we reconcile this with Elders’ comments? I believe that collaboration is not only natural but that it is hardwired into us as human beings. Robert Wright once wrote that our ability to cooperate is the defining trend of human history. Yet for too long we’ve been fed this myth of individualism that has limited both our willingness and our capacity to work together. What’s needed is a greater familiarity with the skills, techniques, practices, and mechanisms of collaboration so that the whole thing becomes as ‘natural’ to us in our organizational lives as it was with these young people at a concert. Of course with the advent of the Internet and social media, we have many more tools at our disposal to help us connect and pursue our shared goals. But what tools do we use and when do we use them? [click]
  4. As I noted in the pre-conference material, social media like Wikis, Facebook, Twitter, and Digg are part of a range of physical and social technologies that can help to foster connectivity and choice within a wide spectrum of social collaboration. This spectrum of social collaboration ranges from: Small group collaboration that is based on direct, face-to-face communication and is dominated by social technologies, TO Mass collaboration that is based on mass communication and is dominated by computer, telecommunications and Internet technologies. [click] Small group collaboration, involves social technologies for networking, building trust, developing relationships, sharing decision making, building consensus, getting shared commitments, establishing performance monitoring, ensuring accountability, developing partnership agreements AND THEN actually doing something together. Once this pre-work is done the social costs of collaboration do decline but the need for relational governance continues as long as a collaboration exists. Small group collaboration might be characterized as: [click] Slow to start up Having relationships before action Requiring high trust Involving high partner monitoring Focusing on tacit knowledge Involving high customization Using team decision making Involving smaller scales &amp; exposure Being driven by member dependent growth To illustrate let me draw again from my work with the Ottawa-Carleton school board where they asked me to reflect on their performance evaluation system for Trustees and senior staff. They pointed me towards the Peel School board as a best practice of board-staff relations and effective collective learning. So I interviewed the Peel Board Chair and asked how they went about staff evaluation. I was told they did all the usual things that everybody did – strategic plan, create annual targets, negotiate metrics, conduct end of year assessments, and so on. Curious I asked her “how have you managed to create such a high level of trust and respect between staff and trustees?”. “What kind of a knowledge exchange system do you have in place to head off things before they become problems? How have you reached such a high level of consensus? How do you keep focused on big picture issues?” She thought for a moment, and then said “We have dinner! We all have dinner together every second week before Board meetings. So if you have an issue you just sit with whoever you need to talk to. There’s no pressure like there is under the glare of the media. There’s just a conversation. People inform each other. They learn from each other. And they make plans with each other.” In small groups, collaboration is often facilitated by such simple practices which bring the right people together in conversation. Small things like having dinner, or coffee or a beer after work become important tools for facilitating partnerships in small groups. [click] While mass collaboration does require a few basic rules, action essentially comes first. Collaborators then react to some initial action by accepting it, modifying it or rejecting it. This is the premise of the well known ‘open source’ technologies such as Linux or Wikis. Complete strangers can collaborate without having to invest anything in establishing a relationship. Hence, this form of collaboration is often assumed to be very efficient. In contrast to collaboration in small groups, mass collaboration may be characterized as [click] : Quick to start up Having relationships after action Requiring low trust Involving low partner monitoring Focusing on codifiable knowledge Involving high standardization Using un-centralized decision making Involving potentially large scales &amp; exposure Being subject to viral growth What’s really interesting is that these forms of collaboration, although polar opposites in some respects, can both produce similar cultures of sharing which includes: [click] Effective dissemination and exchange of information, Knowledge collaboration and frame reconciliation, Collective learning, Shared ownership and decision making, Rigorous feedback &amp; accountability, Innovation, Shared commitment, The development of new resources, and most importantly, The effective and efficient implementation of collaborative endeavours Since Thom Kearney will take up this notion of a culture of sharing in more detail in a moment, I’ll leave it at that for now. The key differentiator between these forms of collaboration is scale. Research has shown that small group collaboration works best in groups less than 25 people. On the other hand, mass collaboration requires access to large audiences, ideally over 100,000, which is why this form of collaboration was not particularly prevalent until the advent of the Internet. Without that reach, mass collaboration tends to be weak, unreliable or lacking in quality. For instance, the basic premise of open source, famously captured by Linus Torvald the originator of Linux, is, “the more eyeballs, the fewer bugs”. Of course, its corollary is also true “the fewer eyeballs, the more bugs”. Some enthusiasts have promoted social media as if simply putting the technology in place will magically generate collaboration, ignoring the huge audience scale needed to be effective. Anyone who has ever tried to create an online chat space or discussion forum knows what ‘white elephants’ these can be. On the other hand, some groups using relational collaboration have tried to extend their reach by involving hundreds or thousands more people and then are surprised by how fruitless and ineffectual their collaboration becomes. Both types of collaboration have well known rules and practices. Trouble is many initiatives are not purely one type or the other. Their scale is somewhere in between. So what do you do with groups larger than 25 and smaller than 100,000 that might want to work together? How do you bridge that middle ground? [click] The answer lies in mixing physical and social technologies. At NRCan, for instance, one of their most strategic choices was to minimize the number of rules which would apply to it. This is a mass collaboration technique and it was achieved by negotiating a handful of rules with Treasury Board, which NRCan now refers to as guardrails. At the same time, they insisted that the wiki have no budget and encouraged employees to build it themselves for their own purposes, which, as it turned out, proved to be largely social – connecting groups of people within the organization. By letting staff take ownership, they created a network of small groups linked together by wiki technology. As a counter example, the senior partners at a major US consulting firm tried implementing Lotus Notes as a platform for firm-wide collaboration only to see it fail. Although the partners themselves were in agreement about its use and collaborative potential, they only later discovered their mistake in overlooking the different dynamics among their more competitive junior associates who had no culture of sharing, no incentives to cooperate, little mutual trust and no way of knowing if their cooperation would be reciprocated. The imposed solution was not their solution. So by not paying attention to these internal relationships, the firm virtually guaranteed the initiative would never get traction. If creating a culture of sharing is the goal, then how much social media should we be using? How much face-to-face communication is enough?? [click]
  5. The answer to these questions lies in the degree to which collaborators need to be aware of each other to align their actions. Research shows that in any collaboration, partners consciously or unconsciously pay attention to the activities of each other and that the more complex and interdependent their work becomes [click], the more the partners must pay attention to each other to appreciate any changes to their shared understandings [click] and their changing individual operating contexts [click]. Since people tend to act together as if they shared the same background understanding (whether or not they actually do), collaboration inevitably encourages conflict when that assumption ultimately proves false. The very distributed nature of collaborative organizations tends to fracture the shared understanding of partners -- something which social media can only partially address. The tacit, trust-oriented dimensions of this mutual awareness require a more direct, face-to-face level of communication [click]. The green line represents the increasing need for on and offline interaction. Putting up a website and simply dumping a lot of content into it, probably won’t require much face-to-face interaction, but create an online space where different disciplines need to interact to create new innovation, or developing the capacity to respond to an emerging new viral pathogen -- these online tools would likely require much more personal contact to coordinate and align partner assumptions. Even Wikipedia needs face-to-face communication at times as one of my students pointed out to me. When a heated debate emerged over Wkipedia’s definition of “fair trade” the various contributors organized their own workshop to try and resolve their differences together. [click].
  6. As a take away, I would like to challenge you in three ways over the course of today : [click] First, consider the upcoming cases and think about the tools, tricks or mechanisms that were used to enhance either mass collaboration or collaboration in small groups. Try and make a list. This list can then become the foundation of your own collaboration tool box. [click] Secondly, consider the possible roles for government and for social media to help facilitate small and large groups working together. New roles for government might include becoming a convener or partnership broker. Alternatively, government could support efforts among partners to improve awareness of each other, or support efforts to integrate other government stakeholders, or provide a clearinghouse for lessons learned and best practices. Social media could support collaboration by maintaining historical records of who said what, when in the lead up to partnerships, OR by simply providing contact information on various partners. It could help to disseminate subject matter content and do so with various levels of access. But social media might also help provide collaboration support information such as business plans, MOUs &amp; agreements, joint implementation procedures and schedules; meeting transcripts, etc. in order to create a reference point for sustaining shared partner awareness. Thirdly, I would encourage you to think about what might be added to your own collaboration or partnership. Are you hearing anything today about how to enhance a small group experience with technology -- to scale it up as it were? Or, are there relationship practices that you might use to enhance your mass collaboration initiative? [click] Ask yourself: Where am I in this continuum between mass collaboration and small group collaboration? Where do I think the balance should be? Am I employing sufficient face-to-face communication? Are there social media tools that could bring others into our conversation? Am I employing enough of the right practices? [click] Then collect your answers, go home, &amp; experiment. Try things out. You’ll be well on your way to becoming a collaboration connoisseur. (click) Thank you
  7. Lastly some interesting resources.
  8. For mass collaboration, they include: Define minimal rules Encourages ownership &amp; minimizes entry barrier Eg. of NRCan’s guardrails Apparently Wikipedia is now struggling because they have imposed a growing number of rules on potential contributors. The rules essentially represent entry barriers, reducing the number of ‘eyeballs’ that may be focused on any given contribution Minimize the specialized functionalities that are ‘hardwired’. Maximize the flexibility and adaptability within the data model. Engagement Keep the barriers to entry low Make it about the overlapping interests of potential partners Create unique community designs Engage both users &amp; developers in community building Design online networks that are more “socially centered”, a social experiment eg NRCan Drive maximum attention to the site using multiple SM tools Find practices that help users to define a sense of identity &amp; shared belonging Self-organization &amp; Ownership Practices Helping users drive development Their ownership will contribute to shared resourcing The dancing guy video demonstrates how this could happen Awareness Practices Managing shared contexts, workflow, contingent cooperation &amp; goal congruence requires practices which permit partners to maintain awareness of each other. Some of this can be done via social media but some of this will require face-to-face contact. The more complex your work together the more you and your partners will need to be aware of your common ground and your evolving organizational and environmental contexts. Coordination Practices (instead of control) Requires a variety of offline supports such as tech training but also face-to-face meetings, knowledge mobilizers or champions, &amp; regular information updates Ongoing mechanisms to measure progress &amp; disseminate results This could also involve senior management support, public indications of moral contracting among partners, establishing failsafes (what to do if collaboration fails) Exchange Practices for Tacit &amp; Codifiable Knowledge Ensuring both subject-matter information &amp; collaboration support information such as MOUs, business plans, reports, minutes, etc. Differing practices for tacit and codifiable knowledge The simple conclusion is that the more people involved (the more your audience resembles an Internet audience) the more you need to apply the practices of mass collaboration AND the fewer people involved the more you need to apply the practices of relational collaboration. However, it is rarely an either / or choice. However, there is no clear cut recipe to achieve this balance. The approach is very much trial and error. One might consider practices which use technology to scale up small group interactions. Alternatively one could think of approaches which scale down large technology facilitated interactions through the introduction of various small group practices. The more practices you know the better off you’ll be. The more you do it the better at it you’ll become.
  9. Dating Practices These are the initial socialization or pre-collaboration exchanges, that shape shared purpose, and create a basis of trust Engagement Practices These are the conversations that take place that include people, empower them and build ownership, help to personalize involvement &amp; generate shared commitment Trust Building Practices These are the things you would do to help build sufficient confidence to begin interacting, or to affirm your trustworthiness and your contingent cooperation. Given that collaboration is essentially an agreement between people this may involve practice that create a moral contract with one another. Meeting Design Practices Creating the meeting architecture Recognize that how we are together determines how we work together Structuring the process w/o structuring the outcomes Governance Practices Establish principles, people, concepts, structure &amp; processes to achieve purpose Shared decision making &amp; consensus Working with multiple accountabilities Operational Practices Appropriate &amp; fair sharing of risks, rewards, workload Learning Practices Developing a common language &amp; shared metaphors Exchanging tacit knowledge Learning while doing through double loop learning Information Dissemination Practices Satisfying social learning, contingent cooperation &amp; multiple accountabilities Eg. Of Peel school board using dinner as a mechanism of accountability and social learning
  10. As something to consider over the day, I wanted to propose several potential roles for government and social media that might help catalyze and sustain collaboration. Already government agencies act as independent stakeholders in knowledge creation, service delivery, regulation, &amp; policy development. But possible new roles for government might include: Acting as convener to bring parties together on various concerns or issues (particularly for face-to-face interactions), Acting as a partnership broker, contributing business planning support; acting as a seed funder; using “street level bureaucrats” willing to build alliances, be entrepreneurial, be persuasive, to educate, and to negotiate; Facilitating partner awareness to reduce the costs of aligning assumptions as well as providing conflict mediation Providing collaboration support: should be sure and fund basic collaborative mechanisms and not treat them as overhead costs; provide a clearinghouse of lessons learned and best practice ; enable data storage, exchange platforms &amp; assessment support. Lastly government could provide some kind of nexus for the integration of collaborative efforts with its own internal government stakeholders Possible roles for social media might include: Maintaining historical records of who said what when, of the conversations that were the precursor of agreements, as well as contact information of the various partners. Social media could provide subject-matter information such as: raw &amp; distilled data, research papers, news, events, policy documents, and other related content such as images, video clips, web links, etc.. Might also include different access levels for public data, data for health professionals and data for policy makers. Social media could also provide specific collaboration-support information, such as: records of previous discussions; MOUs and agreements; business plans; procedures; schedules for joint work; overhead data, such as session transcripts; and meeting minutes