Reading works!4 tm_unit1-watermark

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Reading works!4 tm_unit1-watermark

  1. 1. Unit I Knowing Myself Chapter 1 Discovering the Beauty within Me Lesson 1 Yes, I Can!I. Hits At the end of this lesson, this pupils should be able to 1. use available reference materials in the library by identifying the type of information that can be found in them; 2. compare and contrast related reference materials; 3. show self-confidence by presenting a talent or skill in class; and 4. find the meaning of words using context clues.II. RSS Feed A. Title of the Selection: The Quiz Show B. Values Integration: 1. self-esteem (confidence in oneself / belief in one’s abilities) 2. respect for others (respect for quiet classmates and for what others can do) C. Materials: task cards, manila paper and markers (optional), reference materials (dictionary, encyclopedia, atlas, etc.)III. Live Streaming 1. Use the motivation questions found in Connect to start the lesson. Call two to three pupils to provide their explanation for each question. Ask follow-up questions such as • What competition was this? • How did you feel when you joined that competition? • What are the things you did to prepare for that competition? • How did you feel when...? • What are the things...?
  2. 2. 2. For the second part, define the words confidence, supporters, luck, knowledge, and experience. You may give the definition or you may ask pupils to define them. Allot three to five minutes for this activity. Call two to three students to share their answers. 3. Allot five to seven minutes for the pupils to answer Search. Check their answers to make sure that they understand the meaning of the given words before reading the selection. 4. Ask the pupils to read the selection silently. Provide a graphic organizer to aid them in understanding the selection. This can be done in school if time permits or it can be given as homework. 5. Suggested engagement activities: Guide the pupils in accomplishing the following activities. Task 1: Using a Venn diagram, compare and contrast Erwin and Julia. How are they similar? How are they different? If you were their classmates, who would you choose to be your friend? Why? Task 2: Pretend that you are Julia. Write a journal entry expressing your feelings in winning the general information quiz bee. How do you think Julia would act the following day in school? How do you think her classmates would act toward her? Why do you think so? Task 3: Identify the things or people who help you to be confident. In what way do they make you feel good about yourself? Can you also make other people feel confident about themselves? In what way? 6. Let the pupils answer the comprehension questions in Click on their own to gauge their undertstanding of the story. Process the questions afterward by asking them to share their answers. 7. Bring actual reference materials to use as visual aids during discussion. Or you may divide the class into groups of five pupils. Assign one reference material per group. Ask them to describe it and its uses. 8. Ask the class to do the activities in Link. Check their answers as a class. 9. Encourage the pupils to share their talents and skills by showing your own talent or skill in class. It could be as simple as preparing a mixture for dessert2 Reading Works! 4
  3. 3. such as salad or banana split. Then call the pupils one by one and ask them to present their talent or skill. Make sure that the pupils listen to those who are presenting. Limit the presentation to one to two minutes so that everyone can present. Allot at least two sessions for this activity.IV. Update • http://eduscapes.com/tap/topic9.htm • http://www.cln.org/subjects/refmat.html • http://www.enchantedlearning.com/library/referencebooks/worksheet/ • http://www.englishbanana.com/downloads.html • http://www.suite101.com/content/how-to-use-reference-materials-efficiently -a91900 Lesson 2 Uniquely SmartI. Hits At the end of this lesson, the pupils should will be able to 1. articulate how people have different abilities; 2. define words using the features of the dictionary; 3. identify the main idea of an essay by answering questions about it; and 4. show appreciation of their abilities by relating them to well-known people with the same abilities.II. RSS Feed A. Title of the Selection: What Kind of a Smart Are You? B. Values Integration: 1. valuing abilities 2. awareness of the things one can do and the things one can learn to do. C. Materials: task cards, manila paper and markers (optional), actual reference material (dictionary) Teacher’s Manual 3
  4. 4. III. Live Streaming 1. Allot five minutes for the pupils to do the motivation activity in Connect. Ask three to four pupils to share their answers afterward. You can also ask them to find a partner and share their answers with their partner. If time permits, make a tally of pupils who can do the tasks in the checklist. By tallying what the pupils can do, you can see what type of learners you have in your class. 2. Allot five to seven minutes for the pupils to answer Search. Make sure that the students use a dictionary. Assign them to bring a dictionary the day before. Check their answers to make sure that they understand the meaning of the given words before reading the selection. 3. You may ask the pupils to read the selection silently or you may do an oral reading in class. However, you have to read the first paragraph so you can model the proper way of reading orally. Call five to six students to read the next paragraphs. Ask them to take turns in reading the paragraphs in front of the class. 4. Suggested engagement activities: Guide the pupils in accomplishing the following activities. Task 1: Identify your classmates whom you think match the smart types in the essay. Why do you think they fit the description? Give one to two reasons for each. Task 2: Think of ways on how you can improve the areas you are weak in. Suggest at least three ways. Be guided by the following questions and come up with your own: a. How can a person who is not good in math improve his or her skills? b. How can a person be a better singer or dancer? Task 3: List four to five skills or characteristics that you should have to be successful in your studies. Explain briefly why you think these skills or characteristics are important. 5. Let the pupils answer the comprehension questions in Click on their own to gauge their understanding of the story. Process the questions afterward by asking them to share their answers.4 Reading Works! 4
  5. 5. 6. Ask the class to bring their own dictionaries. Bring a pocket dictionary and a comprehensive dictionary. If resources allow, set up a computer with an Internet connection to access an online dictionary. During the discussion, ask the pupils to identify whether their dictionary is a pocket dictionary or a comprehensive one. 7. Using their personal dictionaries, ask the pupils to identify the parts of a dictionary entry and to point out the guide words. 8. After the discussion, you can have a game in which the pupils will compete in finding words and giving their meanings. The first one to find the assigned words will be declared winner. If a computer set up is available, ask each pupil to try searching a word using the online dictionary. 9. Guide the class in answering the exercises in Link. Check their answers afterward. 10. Motivate the pupils to do Upload by telling them about the person you admire most. Ask them to complete the paragraph on page 19 of their textbook using your output as model and then using their own outputs. Allot two class sessions for this activity. The first session will be a research session. The second one will be a sharing session. Encourage the pupils to look for pictures of the person that they admire and show them to class.IV. Update • http://esl.fis.edu/learners/advice/dic.htm • http://library.thinkquest.org/5585/dictionary.htm • http://literacyworks.org/mi/assessment/findyourstrengths.html • http://www.brainy-child.com/article/multiple-intelligence-activities.shtml • http://www.enchantedlearning.com/dictionary/wordentry/ • http://www.lth3.k12.il.us/rhampton/mi/lessonplanideas.htm • http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/critical_thinking/dictionary/ Lesson 3 The Goodness in MeI. Hits At the end of this lesson, the pupils should be able to 1. compare and contrast the characters in a story; Teacher’s Manual 5
  6. 6. 2. make inferences about the characters in a story; 3. connect the information about a book with its corresponding parts; and 4. show appreciation of someone’s goodness by writing a personal narrative about a time when this person helped someone.II. RSS Feed A. Title of the Selection: The Book of Salamat B. Values Integration: 1. gratitude 2. helpfulness 3. sincerity 4. contentment 5. positive belief in one’s character (knowledge of one’s capacity to be good) C. Materials: task cards, manila paper and markers (optional), textbooks that have complete book partsIII. Live Streaming 1. Allot five minutes for the pupils to do Connect. Ask three to four pupils to share their answers with the class. You can also ask them to find a partner and share their answers with each other. 2. Allot five to seven minutes for the pupils to answer Search. Make sure that the pupils use a printed or online dictionary. Assign them to bring a dictionary the day before. Check their answers to make sure that they understand the meaning of the given words before reading the selection. 3. Ask the pupils to read the story silently in class. You may also assign the reading of the selection as homework and discuss it the following day. 4. Suggested engagement activities: Guide the class in accomplishing the following activities. Task 1: Compare and contrast Kali and Gani using a Venn diagram. In what way are they similar? In what way are they different? Who do you think is more successful? Why? Task 2: Draw three to four ways in which you can remind yourself to be kind to others.6 Reading Works! 4
  7. 7. How can reminding yourself to be kind help you? Why do you think you have to be reminded sometimes that you can be good? Task 3: Using a balance scale, show whether people are generally good or generally unkind. Agree or disagree: People are naturally good. Explain your answer. 5. Let the pupils answer the comprehension questions in Click on their own to gauge their understanding of the story. Process the questions afterward by asking them to share their answers. 6. Ask the pupils to bring out a textbook. Use their textbooks as visual aids. During the discussion, let them find the part of the book that is being discussed. You may also call on volunteers to show to the class the part of the book that is being discussed. You may also ask three to five students to name the parts of the book in front of the class after the discussion. 7. Ask the class to do the activities in Link. Check their answers afterward. 8. Prompt the pupils to do the activity in Upload by sharing a particular instance in which a person thanked you. Allot two class sessions for this activity. The first session will be allotted for writing. The second session will be for sharing with the class (or sharing with a group or partner, depending on the class size) what the pupils have written.IV. Update • http://ethemes.missouri.edu/themes/487 • http://languagearts.pppst.com/partsofabook.html • http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/research/book/ Lesson 4 Afraid No MoreI. Hits At the end of this lesson, the pupils should be able to 1. sequence the events in a selection; 2. classify books and writings as fiction or nonfiction; 3. analyze the reasons for reading particular books through a book talk; Teacher’s Manual 7
  8. 8. 4. show appreciation for the virtue of courage; and 5. articulate reasons for choosing a particular reading material.II. RSS Feed A. Title of the Selection: The Brave Eagle B. Values Integration: 1. bravery (conquering one’s fears) 2. optimism (in facing difficult situations) C. Materials: task cards, manila paper and markers (optional), different kinds of booksIII. Live Streaming 1. Call three to five people to talk about the things that they fear. Let them share why they fear these things. Ask other pupils if they fear the same things. 2. Give the class five minutes to complete the sentence in Connect. Call three to five pupils students to share their answers. 3. Give the class three to four minutes to answer Search. They may use a dictionary if they need to. Check their work afterwards to ensure that they will understand the selection. 4. Do a shared oral reading in class. Post a picture of an eagle on the board. While reading, ask the pupils to point out the part of an eagle that is being mentioned. Explain to the class that, as horrific as it sounds, Ellie’s story is merely a metaphor for what people have to go through in order to change. 5. Suggested engagement activities: Guide the class in accomplishing the following activities. Task 1: Draw a 40-year-old eagle like Ellie. Follow the description in the selection. How does a 40-year-old eagle look like? Explain you answer. Task 2: Based on the selection, present a short play on the process of change that Ellie has to go through. What are the changes that Ellie has to experience? Why does he have to experience those changes?8 Reading Works! 4
  9. 9. Task 3: Draw an eagle that has completed the process of change. Base your drawing on the selection. What are the good things that will be brought about by the painful process? Explain your drawing. 6. Let the pupils answer the comprehension questions in Click on their own to gauge their understanding of the story. Process the questions afterward by asking them to share their answers. 7. Show a variety of books to the students during the discussion. Ask them to identify whether the books are fiction or nonfiction. You may also ask them to bring their favorite book and tell them to identify whether that book is fiction or nonfiction. In your discussion of fiction and nonfiction texts, touch on reality and fantasy. Give examples to help the class understand the concepts. 8. Guide the class in answering he exercises in Link. Check their answers together. 9. Tell the pupils to bring their favorite book in class. Ask them to briefly share with the class why they like that book. Let them say if their book is fiction or nonfiction. Call some pupils to share about their favorite book. Guide Questions: 1. What is the title of the book? Who is the author? 2. Is it fiction or nonfiction? 3. What is the theme or the message of the book? 4. What part of the book interests you the most? Why?IV. Update • http://www.lessonplanet.com/search?keywords=fiction+and+nonfiction& media=worksheets • http://www.myschoolhouse.com/courses/O/1/106.asp Enrichment: • Make a big book about yourself from the time when you were a baby to the present. Choose five to seven important events in your life that you would place in your big book. Present your work in class. • Stage a talent show like “Pilipinas Got Talent” showcasing your talents and your classmates’ talents. Teacher’s Manual 9
  10. 10. Chapter 2 Learning More about Myself Lesson 1 Creating a New MeI. Hits At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to 1. find the meaning of words using context clues; 2. identify the elements of a short story; 3. make a summary of narratives by applying knowledge of story grammar; 4. demonstrate knowledge of story grammar by identifying the characters, setting, and main events of a story; 5. show effective listening skills by summarizing a story they have heard; and 6. show willingness to change by creating a printed sign to remind themselves that they have to improve on their character.II. RSS Feed A. Title of the Selection: The Boy Who Cried Wolf B. Values Integration: 1. improving oneself (in terms of values, habits, and behavior) 2. consequences of lying C. Materials: pens, small sheets of paper, task cards, manila paper, markers, copy of any short story that the pupils can summarize for Activity 3III. Live Streaming 1. Divide the class into groups with three pupils. Tell them to discuss in their groups the following questions. • Have you ever lied before? • Why do you think people lie sometimes? • What will you feel if somebody lied to you? Process the pupils answers afterwards. 2. Allot five to seven minutes for the class to answer Search. Check their answers to make sure that they understand the meaning of the given words before reading the selection.10 Reading Works! 4
  11. 11. 3. Ask the pupils to read the selection silently or do a shared oral reading. Provide a graphic organizer to aid them in understanding the selection. This can be done in school if time permits or it can be done as homework.4. Suggested engagement activities: Guide the class in accomplishing the following activities. Task 1: Present a short monologue of how Ali thought of making fun of the village people. What do you think was going on in his mind when he decided to make fun of the people in his village? If you were as bored as Ali was, would you have done the same thing? If not, what would you have done instead? Why? Task 2: Present a short dialogue between Ali and his father when he returns home without their flock. What do you think should Ali say to his father? How do you think would his father react? Why? Task 3: Role play a meeting among the villagers talking about what Ali did to them. How do you think did the villagers feel after Ali tricked them? Should they help Ali find his flock the next day? Why or why not?5. Let the pupils answer the comprehension questions in Click on their own to gauge their understanding of the story. Let them discuss their answers in class.6. Demonstrate to the class the correct way of summarizing a selection. You may use previous stories to have common references.7. For Activities 1 and 2, ask the pupils to bring their favorite short story or to visit the school library and find a short story. Do a sharing activity afterward.8. For Activity 3, find a story that can be read in class. Prepare a storytelling session of the selection to help the class appreciate the story.9. Let the pupils write an essay about how they can change one bad habit or trait. Tell them to present their essays to the class. Allot one session for this activity. Then allot another session for the pupils’ presentation. Teacher’s Manual 11
  12. 12. IV. Update • http://edhelper.com/Summarizing.htm • http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/bsndev-224528-elements -short-stories-education-ppt-powerpoint/ • http://www.eslprintables.com/printable.asp?id=1 14788 • http://www.graves.k12.ky.us/powerpoints/gchs/hspgray.ppt • http://www.havefunteaching.com/reading-worksheets/summarizing • http://www.lessonplanet.com/search?keywords=short+story+elements+quiz &media=worksheets • http://www.storyarts.org/library/aesops/stories/boy.html Lesson 2 I Love…I. Hits At the end of this lesson, the pupils should be able to 1. define a myth; 2. sequence the events in a given story; 3. apply their knowledge of sequencing events to complete a story; and 4. show appreciation for the important things in life by making a portfolio and a PowerPoint presentation.II. RSS Feed A. Title of the Selection: King Midas and the Golden Touch B. Values Integration: 1. appreciating one’s family and friends 2. evaluating priorities C. Materials: task cards, manila paper, markersIII. Live Streaming 1. Give three to five minutes for the pupils to think about what they value most. Call three to five pupils to share and explain their answers to the class. You can modify this activity by making it a pair work that will allow the pupils to discuss with their partner their priorties.12 Reading Works! 4
  13. 13. 2. Process the activity by saying that people value different things in life and that they should be respected for this. However, valuing people is more important than valuing material wealth, as they will understand from the story of King Midas.3. Allot five to seven minutes for the class to answer Search. Check their answers to make sure that they understand the meaning of the given words before reading the selection.4. Ask the pupils to read the selection silently or do pair reading. Provide a graphic organizer to aid them in understanding the selection. This can be done in school if time permits or it can be done as homework.5. Suggested engagement activities: Guide the class in accomplishing the following activities. Task 1: Using a Venn diagram, compare and contrast the character of King Midas at the beginning and at the end of the story. What changes happened to King Midas? What did he realize at the end of the story? Task 2: Role play a possible scene between King Midas and Marigold after the golden touch was removed by the god. What changes will happen between King Midas and Marigold? How do you think will the King treat his daughter after his experience with the golden touch? Why? Task 3: Make a slogan that shows what you have learned from the story “King Midas and the Golden Touch.” Why is family important?6. Let the pupils answer the comprehension questions in Click on their own to gauge their understanding of the story. Then discuss the answers to the class.7. Present pictures of well-known Greek gods and goddesses, such as Zeus, Hera, and Athena, to let the pupils appreciate what myths are. You may share a particular myth that you like and read it in class.8. Explain the importance of sequencing events in a story. Emphasize that knowing how to sequence events helps readers in identifying the most important events in the story. Teacher’s Manual 13
  14. 14. 9. Guide the pupils in doing the exercises in Link. Check their answers afterward. 10. Before doing the activity, let the pupils list down the things they will include in their portfolio. They should write one sentence for each item explaining why they value the things they have chosen. Allow them to access the Internet for pictures. Allot two sessions for this activity, one for creating the portfolio and the other for presentation.IV. Update • http://greece.mrdonn.org/myths.html • http://littleganeshas.wordpress.com/2008/01/29/the-golden-touch-full -version/ • http://www.havefunteaching.com/reading-worksheets/sequencing • http://www.planetozkids.com/oban/legends.htm • http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/language_arts/sequence/ • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNgrPcVOwrU Lesson 3 The Hero in MeI. Hits At the end of this lesson, the pupils should be able to 1. identify word meaning through word association; 2. define folktales; 3. infer character traits from the selection; 4. explain bases for inferences; and 5. appreciate the value of sacrifice by presenting a role-playing activity.II. RSS Feed A. Title of the Selection: The Little Dutch Boy B. Values Integration: 1. selflessness (making sacrifices) 2. heroism C. Materials: task cards, manila paper, markers14 Reading Works! 4
  15. 15. III. Live Streaming 1. Give one to three minutes for the pupils to think about concepts they associate with the word hero. Call around 7–10 pupils to write their answers on the board. Discuss each answer briefly. You may call out the rest of students to discuss their own answers briefly. 2. Connect the activity to the story by stating whether George can be considered a hero or not. 3. Allot five to seven minutes for the class to answer Search. Check their answers to make sure that they understand the meaning of the given words before reading the selection. 4. Ask the pupils to read the selection silently or orally. Provide a graphic organizer to aid them in understanding the selection. This can be done in school if time permits or it can be done as homework. 5. Suggested engagement activities: Guide the class in accomplishing the following activities. Task 1: Role-play the part where the boy has to plug something into the dike’s hole. What were the things that the boy tried to plug into the hole? If you were George, what would you do in that situation? Task 2: Rewrite the ending of the story. If you were the author, how would you end the story? Why? Task 3: Pretend that you are a reporter and you are going to report about the little Dutch boy. What are you going to say to the people who are watching or listening to your report? 6. Let the pupils answer the comprehension questions in Click on their own to gauge their understanding of the story. Discuss the answers to the class. 7. You may use a Venn diagram to discuss the similarities and differences of myths and folktales. 8. For the discussion of character inferences, you may use popular literary or movie characters as examples such as Cinderalla, Little Red Riding Hood, and Aladdin. Ask the pupils to describe them and explain why they think that way about the given characters. Teacher’s Manual 15
  16. 16. 9. Guide the pupils in answering the exercises in Link. Check their answers afterward. 10. Before dividing the class into groups for the role-playing activity, discuss the possible ways in which the pupils can become heroes in their own simple ways. List their answers on the board as a guide for the group activity. Give the groups 20 minutes to prepare and another 20 minutes to present.IV. Update • http://academic.cuesta.edu/acasupp/as/309.htm • http://members.chello.nl/m.jong9/map12/hansbrinker.html • http://tagaloglang.com/Philippine-Literature/Filipino-Folktales/filipino -folktales.html • http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/Lessons/3767.htm • http://www.pitara.com/talespin/folktales.asp • http://www.testdesigner.com/questions/Making_Inferences_and_Drawing _Conclusions Lesson 4 My Rights to Live RightI. Hits At the end of this lesson, pupils should be able to 1. use the dictionary to define words; 2. note important details in a given text by making an outline; and 3. show appreciation of their rights by making a poster reminding people of children’s rights.II. RSS Feed A. Title of the Selection: The Rights of a Child B. Values Integration: 1. awareness of one’s rights as a child 2. respect for the rights of other children 1 C. Materials: task cards, manila paper, markers, crayons, 4 cartolina16 Reading Works! 4
  17. 17. III. Live Streaming 1. Before letting the pupils accomplish Connect, ask them how they define a good life. Then give your own thoughts on what it means. Allot one to three minutes for the pupils to think of their own needs. Call some pupils to share and explain what they have written. Then emphasize that children like them should be given a good life because they are the future generation of the world. It’s because of this that leaders around the world gathered to ensure that children would be given this kind of life. Touch briefly on the United Nations and its programs on the protection of the rights of children around the world. 2. Allot five to seven minutes for the class to answer Search. Check their answers to make sure that they understand the meaning of the given words before reading the selection. 3. Ask the pupils to read the selection silently. Provide a graphic organizer to aid them in understanding the selection. This can be done in school if time permits or it can be done as homework. 4. Suggested engagement activities: Guide the pupils in accomplishing the following activities. Task 1: Role-play a situation in which one of the listed rights of the children is violated, and then demonstrate what the child should do when this happens. Based on the text, how do the government and other organizations ensure that children’s rights are observed? How do you feel knowing that you have people who can help you when your rights are violated? Task 2: Make a TV commercial to inform other children about their rights. What will you do to tell other children about their rights? How will you inform them? Task 3: List down three to five things which you would like to add to the list of children’s rights. What rights did the Declaration of Children’s Rights leave out? Why do you think the things you added are important? 5. Let the pupils answer the comprehension questions in Click on their own to gauge their understanding of the story. Discuss the answers with the class afterward. Teacher’s Manual 17
  18. 18. 6. Briefly discuss the essay and its three major parts. Give an example to help the pupils understand the concepts better. 7. Prepare an outline and post it on the board. Below are suggested discussion questions you can use in discussing outlines: • What is an outline? • How does it differ from a summary? • What are its uses? • Give the format of an outline? • Compare and contrast the two types of outline. 8. Guide the pupils in doing the activities in Link. Check their answers afterward. 9. Before dividing the class into groups, present a sample poster that reminds people to respect the rights of a child. Explain to the class the necessary information and graphics that their posters should contain. 10. Give the class enough time to make their posters. Check their posters before posting them on your school’s bulletin boards.IV. Update • http://www.eduplace.com/parents/resources/homework/reference/ outline.html • http://www.lessonplanet.com/search?keywords=making+an+outline &media=worksheets • http://www.lessonplanspage.com/LAFashionApproachToOutlining410.htm • http://www.unicef.org/crcartoons/ • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xU07TV3dqze Enrichment: • Plan a children’s rights awareness day in school. • Plan an outreach activity to any institution that helps orphans and abandoned children.18 Reading Works! 4
  19. 19. ANSWER KEY Unit I Chapter 1Lesson 1: Yes, I Can!Search1. b 4. a2. c 5. b3. aClick1. Julia was waiting for the day of the quiz show championship. She was competing in it.2. She read a lot of books, browsed the Net, and listened attentively to her teacher.3. Some students thought that Erwin will win because he is known to be smart and has won the science quiz bee before.4. Answers may vary. (Check the pupils’ answers).5. Possible answer: Julia is behaved and quiet in class.6. Answers may vary. (Check the pupils’ answers).LinkActivity 11. b 4. a2. c 5. d3. b or eActivity 21. Abstract means conceptual or intangible, something that cannot be seen nor touched. Reference: Dictionary2. Answers may vary. Reference: Newspaper, periodical Teacher’s Manual 19
  20. 20. 3. The waters surrounding the country are the Pacific Ocean to the east, the South China Sea in the north and west, and the Celebes Sea in the south. Reference: Atlas, encyclopediaActivity 3(Note: Questions in this activity may be difficult for some pupils without guidance fromyou or their parents. You may opt to discuss these in class or give these as homeworkand tell the pupils to ask help from their parents or tutors in answering the questions.)1. A dictionary offers more information about a word compared to a thesaurus, which focuses only on the synonyms and antonyms of a word.2. A magazine has an informal style while a newspaper has a formal style. A magazine features topics under a unifying theme depending on the issue and its target audience. A newspaper covers various topics and caters to different types of readers.3. Educational Web sites contain all kinds of information that can also be seen in an encyclopedia.Lesson 2: Uniquely SmartSearch1. abilities – natural or learned skill; power to do something2. logic – reasoning3. psychologist – a professional who specializes in the study of the human mind and behavior4. acquire – gain by one’s own efforts5. prefer – to like better than anotherClick1. The different smart types or kinds of intelligences are logic, body, music, picture, word, self, and people.2. People have different abilities because they use or focus on different intelligences.3. People have different intelligences and therefore have different abilities.4. It is possible to excel in more than one intelligence because people are capable of acquiring different intelligences.5. Answers may vary. (Check the pupils’ answers.)6. Answers may vary. (Check the pupils’ answers.)20 Reading Works! 4
  21. 21. LinkActivity 11. a 4. b2. a 5. d3. cActivity 21. cónduct – the way a person behaves. (Check the pupils’ sentences.) condúct – to lead from a position of command; to direct an operation/activity (Check the pupils’ sentences.)2. ínvite – an invitation to an event (Check the pupils’ sentences.) invíte – to ask someone to do something or to request the presence or participation of (Check the pupils’ sentences.)Activity 3(Note: Questions in this activity may be difficult for some pupils without guidance fromyou or from their parents. You may opt to discuss these in class or give these as homeworkand tell the pupils to ask help from their parents or tutors.)1–2. Check the pupils’ answers.Lesson 3: The Goodness in MeSearch1. bloom – to blossom; to grow2. simple-minded – foolish; unsophisticated3. terrible – fearful; dreadful4. absurdity – the quality or state of irrationality or being absurd5. summon – to call forth6. grateful – thankful; appreciativeClick1. Kali and Gani earned their living by planting vegetables.2. Gani was earning more than Kali because he sold his vegetables at a high price.3. Kali listed down the word salamat every time people said salamat to him to Teacher’s Manual 21
  22. 22. remind him of the good things he has done and to motivate him to do more good deeds.4. Possible answer: The Sultan was wise and knew how to recognize a person with a kind heart.5. (Check the pupils’ answer.)LinkActivity 1 Activity 2 Activity 31. title page 1. table of contents 1–3. (Check the pupils’2. copyright 2. glossary answers.)3. table of contents 3. references or bibliography4. bibliography 4. preface5. index 5. indexLesson 4: Afraid No MoreSearch1. feathers2. beak3. talons4. preyClick1. Ellie was afraid of the process of change that he must undergo.2. He was afraid because he would feel pain for a period of time.3. He should pluck his beak, his talons, and his feathers. He should also leave his nest.4. Ellie would die if he does not do all these things.5. (Check the pupils’ answers.)6. (Check the pupils’ answers.) Possible answer: Being courageous or brave means conquering one’s fear.22 Reading Works! 4
  23. 23. LinkActivity 1A. B. C. Guide the pupils in doing the activity.1. F 1. F2. F 2. R3. NF 3. F4. NF 4. R5. NF 5. FActivity 21. Fairy tales are fictional texts because fairies are considered as imaginary beings.2. Fiction are purposely written to entertain people while nonfiction generally aim to give information to people. Chapter 2Lesson 1: Creating a New MeSearch1. countryside2. entertain3. group of sheep4. angrily5. spread outClick1. Ali was taking care of their sheep.2. Ali tricked the villagers because he wanted to amuse himself. (Check the pupils’ answer to the follow-up questions.)3. Possible answer: Ali was naughty, playful, and a liar.4. Possible answer: Ali’s father will be angry at him or he will be scolded. (Check the pupils’ answer.)5. Answers may vary.LinkActivities 1–3 (Check the pupils’ answer.) Teacher’s Manual 23
  24. 24. Lesson 2: I Love...SearchSentences may vary from 1 to 4. Make sure that the words are used in context.Click1. Gold was the most important thing for King Midas.2. Possible answer: King Midas did not pay much attention to his daughter.3. The golden touch is the power to turn everything into gold by touching.4. King Midas learned that gold is not the most important thing when he cannot eat because of it and when he turned his only daughter into gold.5–6. (Check the pupils’ answer.)LinkActivity 1A. B.2, 1, 5, 3, 4 7, 1, 3, 6, 4, 5, 2Activity 2(Check the pupils’ answer.)Lesson 3: The Hero in Me Search D I T C H A B I block A T R O E C L V dam M N L R E A O L S G I U C H C L ditch R H M O I E K A drainage Y A W R E T A W wall A B A R R I E R D R A I N A G E waterway barrierClick1. Dikes are important because they prevent water from flooding the land.2. The dike in George’s place had a small hole on it.3. George plugged the hole with his finger.24 Reading Works! 4
  25. 25. 4. George died during the night.5–6. (Check the pupils’ answer.)LinkActivity 1A. B. C.1. c 1. b 1. a2. e 2. c 2. b3. d 3. a 3. c4. b5. aActivity 2(Check the pupils’ answer.)Lesson 4: My Rights to Live RightSearchPossible answers:1. rights: privileges2. declaration: an announcement3. organization: a group; an association4. stand up: to defend; to upholdClick1. The United Nations listed down the rights of children.2. The leaders listed down children’s rights to protect children from people who may hurt them.3. Possible answers: Bantay Bata 163, DSWD (Check the pupils’ answer.)4. The rights that are being violated are the rights for clothing, shelter, and a clean and peaceful environment.5. To stand up for one’s rights means to defend one’s rights or not to allow anybody to violate one’s rights. Teacher’s Manual 25
  26. 26. LinkActivity 11. T2. F (Topic outline not word outline)3. F (Roman numeral is used not capital letter.)4. T5. FActivities 2 (Check the pupils’ outlines.)Activities 3 (Check the pupils’ essay.) Unit TestA. 1. b 6. b 2. a 7. a 3. a 8. b 4. b 9. a 5. c 10. aB.1. T2. F3. T4. F5. TC.1. atlas2. folktale3. theme4. outline5. essayD. 5, 2, 3, 1, 426 Reading Works! 4

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