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*Mojave woodyaster – Xylorhiza tortifolia (zy-low-RISE-uh tor-ti-FO-lee-uh)
Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)
Native t...
*Desert purple sage – Salvia dorii (SAL-vee-ah DOOR-ree-eye)
Family: Lamiaceae (Mint Family)
Native to: Western U.S. from ...
* Apache Plume – Fallugia paradoxa (fah-LEW-gee-uh par-uh-DOX-uh)
Family: Rosaceae (Rose Family)
Native to: Sonoran Desert...
* Coastal Agave – Agave shawii (a-GAH-vee SHAW-ee-eye)
Family: Agavaceae (Agave Family)
Native to: Pacific coast from San ...
* Banana Yucca – Yucca baccata (YUK-uh bah-KAY(or CAH)-tuh)
Family: Agavaceae (Agave Family)
Native to: Widespread in Sout...
* Bigelow Beargrass – Nolina bigelovii (no-LIE-nuh big-el-OH-vee-eye )
Family: Ruscaceae (Ruscus Family) – formerly in Lil...
California Spurge – Euphorbia misera (yoo-FOR-bee-a MIS-er-a)
Family: Euphorbiaceae (Spurge Family)
Native to: South Coast...
*California copperleaf – Acalypha californica (ak-uh-LY-fuh kal-ih-FOR-nik-uh )
Family: Euphorbiaceae (Euphorbia/Spurge Fa...
* Leafy/Dwarf Reedgrass – Calamagrostis foliosa (cal-uh-muh-GRAH-stis foh-lee-OH-suh)
Family: Poaceae (Grass Family)
Nativ...
* Pacific Reedgrass - Calamagrostis nutkaensis (cal-uh-muh-GROSS-tis nut-KEN-sis)]
Family: Poaceae (Grass Family)
Native t...
*Fiber optic grass – Isolepis cernuus (eye-soh-LEP-is SER-new-us)
Family: Cyperaceae (Sedge Family)
Native to: Coastal reg...
* San Diego Sedge – Carex spissa (CARE (KAR) -ex SPISS-uh)
Family: Juncaceae (Rush Family)
Native to: CA central and south...
* CA Sea Thrift (Pink) – Armeria maritima ssp. californica
(ar-MER-ee-uh muh-RIT-i-muh)
Family: Plumbaginaceae (Plumbago F...
*Harlequin lotus – Hosackia gracilis (ho-SACK-ee-uh GRASS-ill-us)
Family: Fabaceae (Pea Family)
Native to: Coastal areas f...
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Gardening sheets containers 2015

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Plant information sheets on plants covered in talk on California native plants for container gardening.

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Gardening sheets containers 2015

  1. 1. *Mojave woodyaster – Xylorhiza tortifolia (zy-low-RISE-uh tor-ti-FO-lee-uh) Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower Family) Native to: Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of CA, UT, NV & AZ; dry, rocky, desert slopes and washes, riparian areas and canyons between 2,000 and 5,500 feet. Growth characteristics: perennial sub-shrub mature height: 1-3 ft. mature width: 2-3 ft. Drought-deciduous perennial or sub-shrub with many long, gray-green stems that often are bare at the tips. Overall shape is mounded. Leaves linear to lance-shaped, sharply toothed. Both leaves & branches are hairy and glandular. Plant has a pleasant aroma. Blooms/fruits: Main bloom season is spring (Mar-May) but may bloom again in Oct with sufficient summer rain. Flowers are in 2-inch sunflower heads with lavender ray flowers and yellow disk flowers. May be 50+ flowers at a time – extremely showy. Uses in the garden: Most often used as flowering plant in desert themed gardens. Unique and pretty choice for butterfly gardens. Useful in rock gardens, dry gardens and containers. Sensible substitute for: Non-native asters. Attracts: Good butterfly & bird habitat: provides nectar and seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to part-shade. Soil Well-drained – sandy or rocky. Water Best with limited summer water once established (Water Zone 1-2). Fertilizer None needed. Low dose (1/4 strength) in spring if grown in containers Other Inorganic mulch or none. Management: Little care needed. May self-seed if happy. Propagation: from seed: fresh seed in fall by cuttings: ?? Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 8, 10, 13, 16, 38, 48 11/3/15 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  2. 2. *Desert purple sage – Salvia dorii (SAL-vee-ah DOOR-ree-eye) Family: Lamiaceae (Mint Family) Native to: Western U.S. from WA to CA & AZ. Eastern Sierras, Tehachapi Mtns, Mojave Desert; sandy, rocky or limestone soil on dry open slopes, on flats or foothills, usually in pinyon-juniper, sagebrush, chaparral, and cool desert shrub plant communities. Growth characteristics: woody shrub/sub-shrub mature height: 2-3 ft. mature width: 3-4 ft. Many-branched woody shrub with mounded form, usually wider than tall. Rough, peeling back. Leaves silver-gray to gray-green, hairy when young and aromatic, sage aroma. Attractive. Blooms/fruits: Blooms spring through early summer (usually May through July). Extremely attractive when in bloom. Flowers are blue-purple surrounded by red-purple bracts. Flowers are larger and lusher than those of local native sages. One of the prettiest native sages. Uses in the garden: Most often used as an accent plant in desert themed and other water-wise gardens. Good habitat plant for pollinators, including butterflies. A must for the purple garden. Lovely addition to rock gardens. Can be used as a low, informal hedge. Fine in large containers. Medicinal plant: used in many ways for congestion, colds, headache, stomachaches. Sensible substitute for: Non-native Salvias. Attracts: Excellent pollinator habitat: provides nectar for bees, butterflies, even hummingbirds. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun. Soil Well-draining soils a must. Add some gravel to potting mix if growing in container. Water Best with occasional summer water; none in fall. Fertilizer None or ¼ strength once a year in containers. Other Inorganic (gravel) mulch or none. Management: Little needed if conditions are suitable. Propagation: from seed: cold-moist treatment by cuttings: ??? Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 6, 8, 10, 38, 48 11/3/15 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  3. 3. * Apache Plume – Fallugia paradoxa (fah-LEW-gee-uh par-uh-DOX-uh) Family: Rosaceae (Rose Family) Native to: Sonoran Desert mountains and foothills from eastern S. California to western TX and south to N. Mexico; on dry, rocky slopes, open Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and dry washes from 3000 to 8000 ft. Growth characteristics: woody shrub mature height: 4-8 ft. mature width: 5-10 ft. Large, semi-evergreen, many-branched woody shrub. Shape and size depend on available water – generally mounded shape with older branches more upright. Bark shreddy, light colored. Leaves deeply lobed, dark green on top, more white below. Foliage appears lacy, open. Spreads slowly via rhizomes, particularly with plenty of water. Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring-summer – April to June/July. Flowers look like small (2 inch) white rose blossoms – pretty like a wild rose. Seeds have a pink, feathery ‘plume’ that aids in seed dispersal. Plants in seed are extremely showy – you’ll get lots of comments from this species! Uses in the garden: Often used as a shrub in dry gardens or desert-themed gardens. Makes a lovely, lacy hedge or screen. Excellent for erosion control on dry slopes. Fine in areas with hot, reflected heat (along roads, driveways, etc.). Excellent choice for habitat gardens. Sensible substitute for: Non-native shrubs. Attracts: Excellent all-round habitat plant: flowers attract butterflies and native bees and plant provides cover, nesting material and seeds for birds. Deer will browse, Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to part-shade. Can take hot, reflected heat. Soil Most local soils (don’t over-water clays); local pH including mildly alkali. Water Best with occasional water – Water Zone 1-2 to 2 Fertilizer None needed. Other Inorganic mulch (gravel/rock) if any. Management: Easy to grow but does require pruning (like a rose). Prune back old stems to almost the ground in late fall/winter. Shorten younger branches by about 1/3 to shape. Propagation: from seed: easy by cuttings: dig up offsets in late winter Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 6, 8, 11, 13, 14, 24, 28, 38 7/30/12 © Project SOUND
  4. 4. * Coastal Agave – Agave shawii (a-GAH-vee SHAW-ee-eye) Family: Agavaceae (Agave Family) Native to: Pacific coast from San Diego county south into Baja; on dry coastal bluffs and slopes to 1500', in coastal maritime shrub and coastal sage scrub communities. Growth characteristics: clumping succulent mature height: 2-3 ft. mature width: 4-6 ft. clump Evergreen succulent with rosette form typical for Agaves. Leaves dark green, glossy, stiff and lance- shaped. Leaves have sharp spines on leaf tips and curved spines on leaf margins (sides). Plants usually produce offshoots (pups) from the short trunk (caudix) as they mature. A showy plant! Blooms/fruits: Plant blooms once before dying, at age 15+ years. Flowering can occur any time between fall & spring. Flower stalks are massive – 15-40 ft tall. Flowers themselves are yellow to reddish, fleshy and funnel-shaped, in clusters of 50-75. Fruits are dry capsules that split when ripe. Uses in the garden: Often used as an accent plant for its bright green color and unusual shape. Right at home in a coastal sage scrub garden. Interesting addition to a succulent garden, or can be used as a large ground cover. Fine in containers; can be spectacular on slopes. Remember to locate away from paths and other areas where contact with spines could cause injury. Flowers, leaves and stalks are edible – require cooking. Fibers used for weaving, baskets, sandals, etc. Sensible substitute for: Non-native Agaves. Attracts: Probably good habitat for insect pollinators. Lizards hide beneath leaves. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun (coast) to part-shade (some afternoon shade in hot gardens). Soil Best in dry rocky or sandy soils; ok in any local soil with good drainage. Water Infrequent summer water (Zone 1-2) once established. Fertilizer None. Other Tolerates seaside conditions. Management: Fairly easy in most local soils. Parent plant will die after flowering, but offshoots (pups) will continue to grow. Weeding is a challenge. Propagation: from seed: yes; try jiffy pellets for starting by cuttings/offshoots: relatively easy Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 8, 9, 14, 20, 24 6/1/09 * Native to CA but not to Western L.A. Co. © Project SOUND
  5. 5. * Banana Yucca – Yucca baccata (YUK-uh bah-KAY(or CAH)-tuh) Family: Agavaceae (Agave Family) Native to: Widespread in Southwestern U.S. from California’s eastern desert mountains to CO, TX and Mexico. Occurs in Mojave, Sonoran and Great Basin Deserts; uncommon on dry slopes and in dry Joshua tree woodlands up to ~ 7000 ft (lower in CA). Growth characteristics: clumping perennial mature height: 3-6+ ft. mature width: 3-10+ ft. Part-woody sub-shrub that looks like a typical Yucca. Long (1-2 ½ ft), strap-like leaves in a basal rosette. Leaves have sharp spines on their tips and curling fibers along their sides. Plant is rather stiff in appearance. Size and other characteristics depend greatly on available water. Produces offshoots (pups) on spreading rhizomes – slowly spreading. Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring – as early as April and as late as June. Flowers are on a stout stalk that rises slightly above the leaves. Large (1-3 inches), white-purple Yucca flowers cluster along the flowering stalk for several weeks. Very dramatic! Pollinated by the nocturnal pronuba moth. Fruit is fleshy, resembling a small banana (hence the common name) and edible (usually roasted or baked). Important food plant for people and small creatures, birds. Uses in the garden: Most often used in rock gardens or desert-themed gardens. Nice accent plant in Mediterranean or Central American style gardens. Would also complement modern architecture. Can be grown in large containers. Make good barrier plants, rustic hedges. Sometimes grown as a food plant, source of fibers for basketry or source of soap (saponins from roots). Sensible substitute for: Non-native Agaves. Attracts: Excellent habitat plant: provides cover for lizards, habitat for a wide range of insects and fruits/seeds which are eaten by many animals and birds. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to light shade. Soil Well-drained (rocky/sandy are best); any local pH. Water Very drought tolerant but looks better with monthly summer water – Zone 1-2. Fertilizer None needed. Other Little to no mulch; inorganic mulch fine. Management: Carefully (wear protection) remove spent flower stalks. Easy. Don’t overwater. Propagation: from seed: best with 2 month cold treatment by offsets: ?winter Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 2, 6, 8, 16, 24, 44 4/29/13 © Project SOUND
  6. 6. * Bigelow Beargrass – Nolina bigelovii (no-LIE-nuh big-el-OH-vee-eye ) Family: Ruscaceae (Ruscus Family) – formerly in Lilliaceae (Lily family) Native to: Southeastern S. CA deserts to AZ, NV and Baja ; desert mountains, Mojave and Sonoran Desert, slopes and canyons especially along the Colorado River in Creosote Bush Scrub from ~ 1000-5000 ft elevation. Growth characteristics: clumping perennial mature height: 6-10 ft. mature width: 3-5 ft. Herbaceous to half-woody perennial that resembles a yucca or very large bunch grass. Leaves are long (to several feet) and strap-like, in a basal rosette of up to 150 leaves around the thick stem. Leaves do not have barbs or sharp tips – an advantage over the Yuccas & Agaves. A large, dramatic plant that remains grass-like for many years before flowering. Blooms/fruits: Blooms in late spring/early summer – usually May or June. Mature plants produce a stout flowering stalk rising 3-5 ft above the leaves. Clusters of pure- to creamy-white flowers are sweetly scented. Clusters superficially look like Yucca – but more open and with smaller flowers. Uses in the garden: Usually used in desert-themed gardens – appropriate for both Mojave and Sonoran Desert collections. Extremely showy and dramatic – would look nice with modern architecture. Very drought tolerant, so could be used in any water-wise garden. Could probably feature it in a large container – slow-growing. Native Californians baked and ate young flowering stalks; leaves can be used for basketry (green or bleached). Sensible substitute for: Non-native Agaves, large grasses (like Pampas Grass). Attracts: Excellent pollinator habitat plant: provides nectar & pollen. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun. Soil Any well-drained – sandy is excellent; pH 6.0-8.0. Water Drought tolerant once established (Water Zone 1-2). Give one watering in August, then none until the fall/winter rains. Fertilizer None. Other Inorganic mulch, if any. Management: Best if ignored and left to grow as it wishes. Remove spent flowering stalks. Propagation: from seed: store cool; no pre-treatment for fresh in winter by offsets: in winter Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 8, 13 4/30/13 © Project SOUND
  7. 7. California Spurge – Euphorbia misera (yoo-FOR-bee-a MIS-er-a) Family: Euphorbiaceae (Spurge Family) Native to: South Coast, s Channel Islands, w Sonoran Desert of CA to Baja; occasional shrub of sandy coastal bluffs, south facing slopes of coastal scrub and Mojavean desert scrub (rocky). Growth characteristics: woody shrub/small tree mature height: 2-5 ft. mature width: 2-3 ft. Many-branched small shrub or sub-shrub; occasionally larger shrub to small tree. Erect with succulent stems. Drought-deciduous. Small dull green leaves. Interesting looking. Blooms/fruits: Blooms Jan-Aug (April-May most common in western L.A. Co.). Separate male & female flowers. Flowers small, unusual shape. What appears to be a single flower is really a single female and several male flowers. The style (female organ) in the pistillate flower extends outward and is divided at the tip. The anthers (male organs) are bright yellow. Unique! Uses in the garden: Handsome specimen plant in a pot or in the ground. Suitable for succulent bonsai (often naturally dwarfed and shaped by the wind in coastal habitats). Great for dry mixed beds, with other native shrubs and perennials. Attractive even without leaves. Sensible substitute for: Non-native drought-tolerant shrubs like S. African Euphorbias. Attracts: Excellent nectar source for butterflies, bees and hummingbirds. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun near coast; part-shade in hot inland gardens Soil Well-drained soils; sand is best. Any local pH. Water Needs little water once established, but good tolerance in sandy soils; Zone 1-2 to 2-3. Fertilizer None. Other Management: Fairly easy to grow. Forms a dense colony, but not invasive. Wear gloves. Propagation: from seed: yes by cuttings: semi-softwood Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 8, 11, 13, 14, 20 11/28/10 © Project SOUND
  8. 8. *California copperleaf – Acalypha californica (ak-uh-LY-fuh kal-ih-FOR-nik-uh ) Family: Euphorbiaceae (Euphorbia/Spurge Family) Native to: San Diego Co, Sonoran Desert to Baja CA, Mexico; dry, granite slopes, along washes from 700-4000 ft. elevation in Chaparral, Southern Oak Woodland. Growth characteristics: woody shrub/sub-shrub mature height: 3-4 ft. mature width: 3-4 ft. Evergreen, woody shrub unlike any other native. Neat, mounded form with slender branches. Leaves simple, alternate, oval to heart-shaped and green. Twigs are red – gray bark with age. Blooms/fruits: Blooms off and on with rains/irrigation with main periods in spring (Mar-Apr) and fall (Sep-Nov). Flowers quite unusual and decorative. Separate male and female flowers. Male flowers clustered about a spike which often appears pink. Female (pistillate) flowers have long, thinly divided red stigmas. Very interesting a pretty when in bloom – looks like a tropical plant. Uses in the garden: Most often used as an evergreen shrub or accent shrub. Can be used as hedge plant. Does fine in planters and pots. Good choice for mixed beds or as a foundation plant. Sensible substitute for: Non-native small evergreen shrubs like Raphiolepis Attracts: Good bird habitat: provides cover and seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to part-shade (afternoon shade in hot gardens). Soil Adaptable. Clays are fine. pH: 6.0-8.0. Water Wide range – occasional to weekly water (Water Zones 1-2 to 2-3). Fertilizer None needed; ½ strength once a year for container plants. Other Organic mulch is fine. Management: Fairly easy to manage. Has a nice natural shape. Wear gloves when pruning – may cause mild skin rash in some. Propagation: from seed: fresh seed - ?? pre-treatment by cuttings: hardwood – cut summer/fall Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 8, 11, 13, 14 11/3/08 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  9. 9. * Leafy/Dwarf Reedgrass – Calamagrostis foliosa (cal-uh-muh-GRAH-stis foh-lee-OH-suh) Family: Poaceae (Grass Family) Native to: Northern CA coast; uncommon on rocky, steep, sandstone bluffs and cliffs in north coast scrub. Also in lodgepole pine and western white pine forest communities; elevation 0-4,000 feet. Growth characteristics: perennial bunchgrass mature height: 1-2 ft. mature width: 1-2 ft. Gray-green cool-season bunchgrass. It forms a beautiful, dense mound of grey green leaves that reach 2' tall, with showy arching flower stalks to 3' tall. Purple tinge to foliage in fall – very showy; fairly evergreen year-round. Low-growing and dense. On the CA state Rare Species list. Blooms/fruits: Blooms May-Aug. Flowering stalks tan, showy, above leaves. Uses in the garden: Used as a lawn substitute or ornamental grass. Nice choice in dry streambeds or swales, mixed with other native grasses & annuals. Can be planted densely for good cover. Neat & tidy-looking in mixed beds or along walkways. Interesting on slopes and banks. Tolerates wind & seaside conditions. One of the more showy native CA grasses. Sensible substitute for: Non-native lawns, ornamental grasses such as Fountain Grass. Attracts: Good bird habitat: provides nesting materials and seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Part-shade is best, particularly away from coast Soil Well-drained; sandy or gravelly is best Water Regular (best) to occasional summer water Fertilizer None needed Other Management: Remove dead leaves with a rake yearly. Divide or replace as needed, about every 5 years. DO NOT SHEAR. Propagation: from seed: easy by cuttings: divide clumps Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 3, 8, 13 1/31/11 * Native to CA but not to Western L.A. Co. © Project SOUND
  10. 10. * Pacific Reedgrass - Calamagrostis nutkaensis (cal-uh-muh-GROSS-tis nut-KEN-sis)] Family: Poaceae (Grass Family) Native to: Northern CA coast to Alaska; wet areas, beaches, coastal dunes & forests. Growth characteristics: perennial bunchgrass mature height: 3-4 ft. mature width: 3-4 ft. Gray-green cool-season bunchgrass. Purple tinge to foliage in fall; fairly evergreen year-round. Grows in a dense bunch – somewhat coarse appearing. Blooms/fruits: Blooms May-Aug. Flowering stalks tan, showy, above leaves. Uses in the garden: Used as an un-mowed lawn substitute, groundcover or ornamental grass. Nice in dry streambeds. Can be planted densely for good cover. A robust, even coarse-looking accent grass – showy in a large container. Nice background plant in mixed beds. Interesting on slopes and banks, where it is good for erosion control. Tolerates wind & seaside conditions. Sensible substitute for: Non-native lawns, ornamental grasses such as Fountain or Pampas Grass. Attracts: Good bird habitat: provides nesting materials and seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Part-shade is best, particularly away from coast Soil Well-drained; sandy or gravelly is best Water Regular (best) to occasional summer water; Zone 2-3 to 3 Fertilizer None needed Other Management: Remove dead leaves with a rake yearly. Divide or replace as needed, about every 5 years. DO NOT SHEAR. Propagation: from seed: easy by cuttings: divide clumps in winter/spring. Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 4, 5, 8, 11, 13 1/31/11 * Native to CA but not to Western L.A. Co. © Project SOUND
  11. 11. *Fiber optic grass – Isolepis cernuus (eye-soh-LEP-is SER-new-us) Family: Cyperaceae (Sedge Family) Native to: Coastal regions from British Columbia, Canada to Baja California and Texas ; wet, freshwater to brackish places on beaches, dunes, marine bluffs, sandy areas. Growth characteristics: clumping perennial sedge mature height: <1 ft. mature width: 1-3 ft. Evergreen, grass-like sedge with bright green stems and leaves. Resembles a tuft of grass. Spreads via short rhizomes (root-like stems) to form dense clump. Looks good year-round. Note: all parts toxic if ingested; wear gloves to handle as may cause skin rash. Blooms/fruits: Blooms late spring through fall in our area. Flowers in short spikes at ends of stems. Look like lighted tip of fiber-optic cable – hence the common name. Very showy and unusual. Most people are attracted to this sedge even if they don’t like grass-like plants. Uses in the garden: Most often used as a pond (up to 2” below water line) or pool-side plant. Makes a striking container plants – very nice green accent plant. Can be mass planted in moist soils for a grass-like ground cover. Cultivar ‘Dwarf’ is 6 inches or less tall. Sensible substitute for: Non-native sedges, rushes. Attracts: Excellent bird habitat: provides cover and seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Part-sun to fairly shady. Soil Not too particular. Wide pH range. Water Moist soil (Water Zone 3) or inundated to 2 inches above crown. Fertilizer Can fertilize with ½ strength fertilizer – particularly if in container. Other Management: Cut back yearly to produce fresh growth and retain shape. Wear gloves! Propagation: from seed: yes – fresh seed by divisions: easy – chop and plant. Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 3, 4, 8, 13 11/3/15 © Project SOUND
  12. 12. * San Diego Sedge – Carex spissa (CARE (KAR) -ex SPISS-uh) Family: Juncaceae (Rush Family) Native to: CA central and south coast; stream banks in coastal sage scrub and chaparral. Growth characteristics: clumping perennial rush mature height: 2-4 ft. mature width: 3-6 ft. Attractive blue foliage, that resembles a small cattail; with water, grows in dense, showy clumps. Relatively slow growth rate. This is a nice large sedge – very grass-like in appearance. Blooms/fruits: Blooms late spring-early fall; flowing heads held above foliage; attractive Uses in the garden: Excellent ornamental grass. Showy near ponds or lawns where it receives plenty of moisture. Dramatic specimen plant for a conventional garden or wet native garden. Plant in cobbles for a creek effect with other riparian or swale species. Leaf edges are sharp. Sensible substitute for: Non-native ornamental pool-side bunching grasses (Pampas Grass). Attracts: Excellent bird habitat: provides cover and seeds for food. Larval food for Umber Skipper butterfly. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to full shade Soil Any moisture retentive soil; best with pH 5.0-7.5 (slightly acid) Water Best with continually mist soil, summer water. Drought tolerant when mature, but will brown. Tolerates seasonal flooding Fertilizer low Other Tolerates alkali soils, foot traffic Management: Will form large, dense clumps connected by rhizomes. Shear after flowering to remove old leaves and produce bluest color. Can get by with shearing every few years. Propagation: from seed: not difficult by divisions: after flowering in fall/winter Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 3, 8, 9-11, 13, 16, 20, 21, 24, 25 1/31/11 © Project SOUND
  13. 13. * CA Sea Thrift (Pink) – Armeria maritima ssp. californica (ar-MER-ee-uh muh-RIT-i-muh) Family: Plumbaginaceae (Plumbago Family) Native to: CA coast from Santa Barbara Co north to British Columbia, Canada; ocean bluffs, ridges, coastal strand, sandy places, exposed grasslands below 100 ft. elevation. Growth characteristics: herbaceous perennial mature height: <1 ft. mature width: 1-2 ft. Mounded evergreen herbaceous perennial. Leaves are medium- to blue-green, narrow and grass- like in a stiff tufted rosette at the base. Very tidy looking with a little water. Woody rootstock. Blooms/fruits: Blooms from mid-spring into summer – may have long bloom period in garden. Blooms are tiny, usually pink (may be white) in rounded clusters on a short stem – somewhat onion- like in appearance. Flowers attract pollinator insects. Very pretty and charming. Uses in the garden: Often used to border walkways or in pots. Would make a nice permanent addition to the vegetable garden (for color and to attract pollinators). Nice in a rock garden or as a border for beds (particularly where they get sprinkler water). Good under fountains. Sometimes used in coastal prairie/north coast plantings along the coast. Nice cut flower. Sensible substitute for: Non-native perennials like Dianthus. Attracts: Excellent pollinator plant: attracts native bees, butterflies & others. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Part-shade best; full sun only along immediate coast. Soil Most local soils are fine. Does well in clays. Water Moderate to regular water – Water Zones 2-3 to 3 best. Fertilizer Not needed, but would be OK with some fertilizer. Other Organic mulches fine. Management: Easy with proper water. Divide and replant when the center dies (every 3-4 years). Propagation: from seed: fairly easy w/ fresh seed by divisions: easy – just divide Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 5, 6, 8, 13, 24 5/29/12 © Project SOUND
  14. 14. *Harlequin lotus – Hosackia gracilis (ho-SACK-ee-uh GRASS-ill-us) Family: Fabaceae (Pea Family) Native to: Coastal areas from N. CA to British Columbia, Canada; moist soils, in Mixed Evergreen Forest, Northern Coastal Scrub, Closed-cone Pine Forest, wetland-riparian communities, from near sea level to lower elevations of coastal mountains. Growth characteristics: herbaceous perennial mature height: <1 ft. mature width: 1-2+ ft. Spreading herbaceous groundcover from a taproot. Stems either sprawling or mounded, eventually forming a mat-like clump. Stems weak & hollow. Leaves compound with simple, green leaflets. Dies back in winter in colder climates. Spreads above ground (by stolons) and below (by rhizomes). Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring, Mar-July. Probably the prettiest of the native lotuses. Flowers have the typical pea-like shape, with a bright yellow banner and pink or purple colored keel. Flowers look like small, two-toned sweet pea flowers. Enchanting and exotic appearance. Fruit: a pea pod with several speckled bean-like seeds. Uses in the garden: Most often used as a ground cover near ponds, pools and in other moist places. Would make a wonderful trailing plant in bog containers and other moist containers. Pretty border plant in flower beds that get regular water. Good choice for pollinator gardens. Sensible substitute for: Non-native flowering groundcovers. Attracts: Excellent native bee habitat: provides nectar & pollen. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun (coast) to part-sun and even fairly shady (under trees). Soil Adaptable; probably best with slightly acidic soils (pH 5.5-7.0). Water Moist soil; regular water. Fertilizer ½ strength dose once or twice a year for container-grown plants. Other Fine with organic mulch. Management: Needs little if has the proper conditions. Cut off old stems as needed. Propagation: from seed: scarify, then pre-germinate in moist paper towel by divisions: yes Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 5, 13, 19 11/3/15 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND

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