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* Anderson’s Wolfberry – Lycium andersonii (LISS-ee-um an-der-SOW-nee-eye)
Family: Solanaceae (Nightshade Family)
Native t...
*Smooth mountain mahogany – Cercocarpus minutiflorus
(ser-ko-KAR-pus min-yoo-tih-FLOR-us)
Family: Rosaceae (Rose Family)
N...
*San Diego sagebrush – Artemisia palmeri (are-teh-MEE-see-uh PALM-er-eye)
Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)
Native to:...
*Baja sage – Salvia chionopeplica (SAL-vee-uh shown-oh-PEP-lee-kuh)
Family: Lamiaceae (Mint Family)
Native to: Western slo...
*Cedros Island sage – Salvia cedrosensis (SAL-vee-uh say-dro-SEN-sis)
Family: Lamiaceae (Mint Family)
Native to: Cedros Is...
*Angelita daisy/ Stemless four-nerve daisy – Tetraneuris acaulis
(tet-ruh-NYUR-iss a-KAW-liss)
Family: Asteraceae (Sunflow...
*Dwarf goldenstar – Bloomeria humilis (Bloo-MARE-ee-uh HUM-ill-us)
Family: Themidaceae (Brodaea Family); formerly included...
*Kennedy’s (Cushion) buckwheat – Eriogonum kennedyi
(er-ih-OG-uh-num KEN-ned-ee-eye)
Family: Polygonaceae (Buckwheat Famil...
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Foreground plant sheets

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Plant sheets for plants covered in lecture on perspective and garden design.

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Foreground plant sheets

  1. 1. * Anderson’s Wolfberry – Lycium andersonii (LISS-ee-um an-der-SOW-nee-eye) Family: Solanaceae (Nightshade Family) Native to: Foothills and desert areas from S. CA to New Mexico and S. to Baja. Locally in the Mojave desert; dry, stony hills, mesas & desert washes, usually below 4000 ft. Growth characteristics: woody perennial shrub mature height:4-8+ ft. mature width:4-8+ ft. Many-branched, rounded spiny shrub. Leaves are thick, fleshy, of variable size & shape depending on moisture. Foliage very dense – provides good cover. In nature, grows singly or in clumps. Blooms/fruits: Main bloom period in spring, sometime between Mar & May. Flowers are tubular, white-lavender in color, small but pretty up close. Hummingbirds like the nectar. Fruit is an edible orange fruit – eaten raw, dried or cooked. Berries are small but very showy in Summer/Fall. Uses in the garden: Most often used as a hedge or large shrub in water-wise Southwestern gardens. Good for hillsides & erosion control. Excellent habitat plant (see below). Nice addition for desert palette gardens, particularly as it is a larger shrub. Can be pruned/shaped – even hedged. Sensible substitute for: Non-native shrubs. Attracts: Excellent all-round habitat plant. Dense foliage provides cover, perches & nesting sites for birds, small animals. Fruits and seeds eaten by birds. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to light shade. Soil Well-drained – sandy to gravelly is best; Water Dry (Zone 1-2) to semi-dry (Zone 2 – probably best in garden setting) Fertilizer None – low needs. Other Tolerates maritime exposure, salty soils/water. Management: Prune to shape, if desired. Remove dead branches. Long-lived and hardy. Propagation: from seed: yes; fresh seed by cuttings: use growth hormone; difficult Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 10, 13, 16, 21, 47 1/29/17 * CA native plant – probably not native to Western L.A. county © Project SOUND
  2. 2. *Smooth mountain mahogany – Cercocarpus minutiflorus (ser-ko-KAR-pus min-yoo-tih-FLOR-us) Family: Rosaceae (Rose Family) Native to: Extreme southern California (primarily Peninsular ranges of San Diego County) and northern Baja California; slopes, often near seasonal creeks from coast to the foothills. Usually in chaparral, but may be other (riparian or oak woodland). Growth characteristics: large woody shrub/tree mature height: 6-12 ft. mature width: 8-12+ ft. Woody evergreen shrub that can be pruned up to a small tree. Small, simple, bright to medium green leaves. Fast/medium growth to 8 ft. then slower. Nice mounded shape. Gray-brown bark. Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring – March-May. Flowers small, buff-color, largely inconspicuous, but attract many bee pollinators. Feathery seeds are very pretty – shine silvery when back-lit. Uses in the garden: Makes a nice background shrub – good shape, evergreen, smaller leaves. Attractive as a small tree. Sometimes used as informal large hedge, mixed hedgerow with Toyon/Ceanothus or as a screen. Can be pruned or sheared for narrow spaces. Fine on slopes; good for erosion control. Frost-hardy. Sensible substitute for: Non-native large evergreen shrubs, small trees. Attracts: Good bird habitat: provides cover and seeds for food. Excellent spring bee plant. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to part-shade. Soil Best in well-drained soils, but tolerates clays. Any local pH. Water Occasional summer water once established (Zone 1-2 to 2; once a month or less). Fertilizer None needed. Other Ok with moderate depth organic mulch. Management: Prune to shape if desired. Don’t over-water in summer. Pretty care-free shrub. Propagation: from seed: fresh seed – low germination % by cuttings: likely yes Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 3, 10, 13, 24 1/29/17 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  3. 3. *San Diego sagebrush – Artemisia palmeri (are-teh-MEE-see-uh PALM-er-eye) Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower Family) Native to: Coastal valleys of southern San Diego and NW Baja California; shrubby bluffs & canyons below 1500 ft. in coastal sage scrub or riparian plant communities. Rare in wilds due to development of small natural range. Growth characteristics: part-woody sub-shrub mature height: 2-5 ft. mature width: 3-6 ft. Drought deciduous sub-shrub that is green most of the year with a little summer water. Brittle, wand-like branches with deeply dissected (linear lobes), aromatic leaves. Overall appearance looks like a cross between Artemisia californica and A. dracunculus (CA wild tarragon). Blooms/fruits: Blooms in summer, sometime between May & Sept. Flowers very similar to Artemisia californica: small, gold-pink bell-shaped flowers along the stalks. Bee pollinated. Uses in the garden: Most often used in habitat gardens, primarily for seed-eating birds. Foliage is attractive – looks nice with Salvias, Coyote bush and native Buckwheats. Good quick filler plant between slower-growing trees and shrubs. Aromatic foliage is a plus. Fine on slopes. Sensible substitute for: Non-native sub-shrubs. Attracts: Numerous birds are attracted to the seeds, including quail, thrashers, towhees and finches. Excellent bee habitat (for short period). Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun (immediate coast) to part-shade (elsewhere). Soil Tolerates most, including sand; any local pH. Water Best with monthly summer water; hose off foliage (grows in fog belt). Fertilizer None needed. Other Thin/no organic mulch Management: Prune or not (pruned plants more dense). Hose off when dusty (spring/summer). Propagation: from seed: fresh seed - easy by cuttings: likely yes, in summer Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 8, 10, 13, 14, 16, 20, 24 1/30/17 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  4. 4. *Baja sage – Salvia chionopeplica (SAL-vee-uh shown-oh-PEP-lee-kuh) Family: Lamiaceae (Mint Family) Native to: Western slopes of San Pedro Martir, San Telmo, San Fernando mtns, Baja CA; in chaparral, often on sunny, west-facing slopes. Growth characteristics: half-woody sub-shrub mature height: 2-3 ft. mature width: 3-5 ft. Mounded sub-shrub with silver-white foliage – similar in appearance to Purple sage. Low, mounded growth. Leaves simple, densely hairy and very aromatic. Pretty plant. Blooms/fruits: Blooms usually in spring to late spring (Apr-June) in our area; may bloom again in fall. Flowers similar to Purple sage but blue-violet rather than rose-violet in color. Flowers held on stalks above the foliage – very showy. Flowers attract wide range of pollinators including bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Uses in the garden: Most often used as an accent shrub for both its foliage color and pretty blooms. Excellent choice for silver or aroma garden. Fine on hot, dry slopes. Leaves can be used for potpourri or as a seasoning. Good drought tolerant shrub for habitat garden. Lovely with Salvias of contrasting foliage. A ‘must have’ for the Salvia aficionado. Sensible substitute for: Non-native sages. Attracts: Excellent pollinator, bird & hummingbird habitat: provides nectar, seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun. Fine with west-facing exposure. Soil Well-draining; plant on berm if not. Any local pH. Water No or occasional summer water (Water Zone 1 to 1-2; once every 4-6 weeks). Fertilizer None needed. Other Light mulch only. Management: Deadhead to promote secondary bloom. Prune like Purple sage in summer or fall. Propagation: from seed: fresh seed – no experience by cuttings: likely yes Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 13 1/29/17 * California Floristic Province native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  5. 5. *Cedros Island sage – Salvia cedrosensis (SAL-vee-uh say-dro-SEN-sis) Family: Lamiaceae (Mint Family) Native to: Cedros Island off the coast of Baja California and on the adjacent mainland at Vizcaino Peninsula; along dry riverbeds and canyons in rocky soil, coastal sage scrub/chaparral. Growth characteristics: half-woody sub-shrub mature height: 1-2 ft. mature width: 2-3 ft. Relatively low-growing, mounded or fountain-like sub-shrub. Leaves are small, rounded, covered in dense, white hairs. Foliage appears silvery to almost white (like White sage). Aroma is mild, pineapple-like. Very attractive smaller salvia. Frost-tender – water & cover if frost predicted. Blooms/fruits: Blooms off and on throughout year; peak is late summer/early fall. Flowers are violet-blue in whorls on 4-5 inch flowering stalks above foliage. Flower shape is typical for Mint family; petals are fused into distinct lips. Flowers attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Uses in the garden: Size and color make this sage useful along borders or edging walkways. Plant tolerates heat well, so fine in hot places in the garden. Looks lovely with other Salvias and native shrubs and perennials. Nice accent plant in a habitat garden. Natural cultivar ‘Baja Blanca’ has all the good characteristics of the species, but has white flowers. Does well in containers. Sensible substitute for: Non-native Salvias. Attracts: Excellent pollinator & bird habitat: provides nectar, pollen and seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to light shade. Tolerates heat. Soil Well-drained best but clays possible w/ careful irrigation; any local pH. Water Water regularly to establish, then occasional summer water (once a month or less). Fertilizer None needing in ground; yearly dose of ½ strength in containers. Other No mulch or rocky mulch best; thin organic mulch OK. Management: Prune back to 3-4 sets of new leaves per branch in fall. Watch for aphids. Propagation: from seed: fresh seed; fairly easy by cuttings: yes, summer. Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 7, 14, 71 1/31/17 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  6. 6. *Angelita daisy/ Stemless four-nerve daisy – Tetraneuris acaulis (tet-ruh-NYUR-iss a-KAW-liss) Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower Family) Native to: Western U.S. from ID and ND to TX and the desert foothills of San Bernardino Co.; open dry hillsides, roadside, dry grasslands and dry plains, Pinyon-Juniper Woodland (in CA). Growth characteristics: herbaceous perennial mature height: 1-2 ft. mature width: 3-5 ft. Evergreen (or mostly so) perennial wildflower, natural groundcover. Leaves simple, oblong in dense basal rosette. Leaves hairy, glandular (unusual aroma when crushed). Fast-growing; spreads. Blooms/fruits: Blooms off and on throughout the year, but warm season (Apr-Sep) is the height of bloom. Showy, yellow daisy-type heads on slender, leafless stems above the foliage. Very unique and lovely appearance. This is one of the prettiest yellow-flowering native perennials. Uses in the garden: Most suitable for sunny foregrounds, along pathways or in deep containers. Often used as a water-wise groundcover. Good habitat plant for both pollinators and seed-eating birds. Excellent accent plant. Often used in rock gardens or desert-themed gardens. Takes heat. Sensible substitute for: Non-native sunflowers, gold lantana. Attracts: Excellent pollinator & bird habitat: provides nectar, pollen and seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to light shade; hot locations are fine. Soil Well-drained soils; any local pH. Water Low to moderate summer water – dry out between (Water Zone 2 optimal). Fertilizer None needed in ground; spring dose of ½ strength in containers. Other No mulch or inorganic mulch is best. Management: Prune late winter to early spring; deadhead any time needed (will start to look ratty). Will re-seed. Has taproot; resents moving once established. Propagation: from seed: easy from fresh seed by divisions: yes – probably easy if small Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 8, 14, 24, 65 1/29/17 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  7. 7. *Dwarf goldenstar – Bloomeria humilis (Bloo-MARE-ee-uh HUM-ill-us) Family: Themidaceae (Brodaea Family); formerly included in Alliaceae (Onion Family) Native to: Endemic to San Luis Obispo and Monerrey Counties, on the coastline near San Simeon; grassland/chaparral edges, open mesas on ocean bluffs. Only two known populations; very rare. Growth characteristics: perennial bulb mature height: < 6 inches mature width: < 6 inches Small perennial wildflower from an underground corm. Several grass-like leaves emerge in spring and die back, often before flowering is over. This is one of our truly short bulb-formers. Blooms/fruits: Blooms in late spring – usually May-June but may be earlier. Flowers look like those of the Common Goldenstars (Bloomeria cracea) - golden-yellow trumpets. Tepals (‘petals’) are reflexed back and have a brown stripe on their outer surface. Wonderful at eye level. Uses in the garden: Most often used as part of native prairie. Probably best in shallow pots or rock gardens, where plants can be featured as accents. Great along paths or front of beds, with other short bulbs. Charming rare native provides a touch of color when massed. Sensible substitute for: Non-native bulbs & corms. Attracts: Birds enjoy seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to part-shade. Soil Best in heavy, clay soils but OK in others; any local pH. Water Need good water until leaves yellow. Then let dry out – dry in summer. Fertilizer Refresh part of soil yearly in containers; otherwise none needed. Other No mulch or inorganic mulch is best. Management: Store bulbs (even still in pot) in cool, dry place over dry season. Replant large corms if pot becomes crowded. Propagation: from seed: easy with fresh seed. Three years until flowering size. by offsets: easy Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 18 1/3/17 * California native, but not native to Western Los Angeles County © Project SOUND
  8. 8. *Kennedy’s (Cushion) buckwheat – Eriogonum kennedyi (er-ih-OG-uh-num KEN-ned-ee-eye) Family: Polygonaceae (Buckwheat Family) Native to: Desert mountains of Central and S. CA; dry stony or gravelly slopes and ridges, 5000- 7500 ft. elevation with Rabbitbush, Big sagebrush and other desert mountain shrubs. Growth characteristics: perennial/sub-shrub mature height: < 1 ft. mature width: 2-3 ft. Very low-growing perennial buckwheat. Everything about the species is diminutive: miniature silvery leaves, mat-like habit. Dries out in fall – may appear dead. Spreads slowly with age. This is an unusual specimen plant. Blooms/fruits: Blooms in late spring – often Apr-Jun in lowlands, later at higher elevations. Flowers are the typical, small pink-white blossom of the buckwheat. In this species, flowering stems are very short – 6-8 inches. This is an adorable plant with the flowers of a buckwheat. Uses in the garden: Most often used in rock gardens or containers. Small size makes it a perfect foreground plant in small gardens. Unique accent plant – people are drawn to it (like any miniature). Numerous types of wasps, bees, and flies have been recorded as pollinators. Sensible substitute for: Non-native miniature plants. Attracts: Excellent bird & pollinator habitat: provides pollen, nectar and seeds for food. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun ; (possibly part-sun) Soil Well-drained, rocky; any local pH Water Occasional – once monthly in summer (Water Zone 1-2 to 2) Fertilizer None needed Other Gravel mulch or none. Management: Prune off dead flower heads in fall. Propagation: from seed: fresh seed by cuttings: probably – no experience with Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 6, 11, 13, 14, 30 1/29/17 * not native to western Los Angeles County, but a CA native © Project SOUND

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