Annual wildflowers 2014 final - notes

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Annual wildflowers 2014 final - notes

  1. 1. 1/4/2014 Out of the Wilds and Into Your Garden Accent on Annuals: some of our more unusual annual wildflowers C.M. Vadheim and T. Drake CSUDH & Madrona Marsh Preserve Madrona Marsh Preserve Gardening with California Native Plants in Western L.A. County Project SOUND – 2014 (our 10th January 4 & 7, 2014 year) © Project SOUND What do you think of when you picture a wildflower garden? © Project SOUND Many of us have a hard time envisioning wildflowers in our gardens http://www.theodorepayne.org/history/seedspmix2a.jpg http://gardenersbasement.com/planting-a-wild-flower-garden/ © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 1
  2. 2. 1/4/2014 It’s time for the California native gardening tradition to take the next step… 2014: Bringing Nature Home - Lessons from Gardening Traditions Worldwide … become more sophisticated http://mostbeautifulgardens.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/simplesofisticated-backyard-garden.jpg © Project SOUND http://acharlottegarden.blogspot.com/2011/08/california-native-plant-garden-at-san.html Bringing Nature Home: Mother Nature + the art of gardening (gardening ‘secrets’) © Project SOUND © Project SOUND The ‘essence’ of Japanese gardening is to capture the ‘spirit’ of the natural world in which we live - and bring it home © Project SOUND 2
  3. 3. 1/4/2014 Wildflower gardens should reflect (but not necessarily recreate) their natural context Beautiful, authentic gardens begin with nature  First we need to develop a deep understanding of the natural landscape http://sequoiariverlands.wordpress.com/category/native-plants/  Then we must determine the ‘essence’ of what makes our California landscape unique  Only then can we apply traditional principles for ‘bringing nature home’ http://gardenersbasement.com/planting-a-wild-flower-garden/ http://www.moprairie.org/placemarks/coyne-prairie-dade-county/ http://www.laspilitas.com/easy/easywildflower.htm © Project SOUND We’ve focused on local prairie/pool plants used in local gardens http://www.plantscomprehensive.com/category/tags/san-diego-native-landscaping?page=3 © Project SOUND Turkish rugging – Chorizanthe stacticoides  Camissonia species (Suncups)  Clarkia purpurea (Purple Clarkia)  Collinsia heterophylla (Chinese Houses)  Gilia tricolor (Birds-eye Gilia)  Lasthenia californica (Goldfields)  Layia platyglossa (Tidytips)  Lupines (Lupinus bicolor; L. succulentis)  Annual Salvias http://www.speciesphoto.com/images/sjwa/2004_03_09/DSCN0009.html Today we’ll venture further afield in search of annual wildflowers for the home garden © Project SOUND ©2009 Thomas Stoughton © Project SOUND 3
  4. 4. 1/4/2014 Size depends on conditions Turkish rugging – Chorizanthe stacticoides  Size:  Foothills/mountains of the Coast Ranges from Monterey County southward into San Bernardino, Riverside, and Orange counties.  Another series of populations on Santa Catalina Island and along the coast (L.A. Co.) and immediately adjacent foothills in Orange and San Diego counties    Growth form:   ©2009 Robert Steers Herbaceous annual wildflower Form typical for annuals in buckwheat family:  Erect or spreading  Foliage: http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_IJM.pl?tid=19357 Sandy to gravelly or rocky places, coastal scrub, mixed grassland, chaparral, pine-oak woodlands, 1000-4000 ft elevation 1 ft tall 1-5 ft wide (spreads with water)  In LA. County: Catalina Isl.; Malibu Lake; ‘Inglewood Hills’; Santa Monica, San Gabriel, Santa Susanna & Verdugo Mtns     Highly variable ©2003 Michael Charters  Mostly in basal rosette Spatulate leaves; often hairy Leaves dry up at time of flowering; nice colors Infusion of entire plant used as lotion for pimples © Project SOUND Flowers: pinks  Blooms: depends on rains; April-July © Project SOUND Plant Requirements  Flowers:    ©2009 Thomas Stoughton   Soils:  Texture: well-drained best  pH: any local  Light: full sun to light shade Pink (medium to bright), lavender Many small flowers in loose or dense clusters – flat spray Involucres (series of bracts beneath flowers) & petals colored Combination of colored leaves, bracts, flowers gives multicolored effect – ‘Turkish rugging’  Water:  Winter: soils need to be moist through growth season  Summer: taper off once flower buds begin to form  Fertilizer: none needed - likes poor soils; low dose if fine  Other: no mulch or gravel mulch for best reseeding ©2005 Aaron Schusteff ©2009 Neal Kramer http://www.smmflowers.org/bloom/species/Chorizanthe_staticoides.htm © Project SOUND http://nathistoc.bio.uci.edu/plants/Polygonaceae/Chorizanthe%20staticoides. htm 4
  5. 5. 1/4/2014 Turkish delight CA Wildflower gardening basics   Obtain seeds from a reputable CA native plant source     Plant seeds when winter rains begin  For best growth & reseeding, plant in bare ground or (better) use an inorganic (gravel) mulch  ©2011 Chris Winchell Massed – on slopes or where can be viewed from above In a rock garden or dry stone wall In containers Combined with summer-dry grasses As spring groundcover around local native shrubs  Keep plants well-watered during growing season – don’t hesitate to supplement  Taper off water when flowering starts to wane http://sbwildflowers.wordpress.com/wildflowers/polygonaceae/choriz anthe/chorizanthe-staticoides/  Let plants reseed naturally or collect and store seed © Project SOUND * Desert Candle – Caulanthus inflatus http://www.smmtc.org/plantofthemonth/plant_of_the_month_201306_Turkish_Rugging.php http://nathistoc.bio.uci.edu/plants/Polygonaceae/Chorizanthe%20staticoides.htm © Project SOUND * Desert Candle – Caulanthus inflatus  Common, Mojave desert; Antelope Valley; also in S. Sierra foothills, foothills of Transverse Ranges  Open, sandy plains and rocky slopes between 2000' and 5000‘ in Creosote Bush Scrub, Valley Grassland, Joshua Tree Woodland http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?2240,2371,2388 ©2003 Mark Bratton © Project SOUND Jo-Ann Ordano © California Academy of Sciences. ©2010 Neal Kramer © Project SOUND 5
  6. 6. 1/4/2014 Desert candle: an unusual ‘Mustard’ Flowers: weird & wonderful  Size:    Blooms: in spring after rains; in 1-2 ft tall 1-2 ft wide the wilds, Mar-May, in garden probably Mar-Apr.  Flowers:  Growth form:     Herbaceous annual Robust, upright habit Stem is swollen and hollow Young upper stems can be cooked and eaten    Brassicaceae  Foliage:   Flowers are small, very narrow tubes & white Flower bracts are white tipped with maroon-purple Flowers on short stalks around the inflated stem – typical for  Large, coarse leaves, often with toothed margins Leaves clasp the stem Overall appearance: a lit ‘candle’ – hence common name  Seeds: in long ‘pod’ that splits when dry, dropping seeds Charles Webber © California Academ y of Sciences JoAnn Ordano © California Academy of Sciences. © Project SOUND Caulanthus from seed Desert foothills  Known to have low germination rates  Texture: best with well-drained – sandy, rocky – no heavy clays  pH: any local incl. alkali  Water:  Winter: needs good soil moisture Nov/Dec until Feb.  Summer: taper off after flowering commences  Look to Mother Nature:  How long are seeds in ground in nature?  What factors are they exposed to? Heat? Cold? Multiple rains? Fire/smoke?  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils  Other: need to plant in Nov/Dec., even if you have to water. More on winter watering in our March talk – ‘Climate Change ‘  More on this next month – ‘Botany for Gardeners’ © Project SOUND  Soils:  Light: full sun  Usually means some pretreatment factor is needed http://www.hazmac.biz/030421/030421CaulanthusInflatus.html © Project SOUND ©2011 Aaron Schusteff ©2010 Neal Kramer ©2009 Shawn DeCew © Project SOUND 6
  7. 7. 1/4/2014 Garden candles     ©2005 Dieter Wilken In a desert-themed garden In a dry rock garden, with other spring annuals In a dry meadow planting, with cool season grasses, S. CA wildflowers As an unusual pot plant – often the unusual ones are the most fun ©2008 John Game © Project SOUND These are unusual wildflowers, but how can I use them effectively in my garden? ©2009 Shawn DeCew © Project SOUND South Africa: much in common with us Let’s see what gardens from another, similar climate can suggest  Mediterranean climate  Topography shaped by plate tectonics  High mountains http://www.selftours.co.za/maps.htm w. L.A. Co. http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/traveler/none/south-africa © Project SOUND http://www.southafrica-travel.net/Medaia/Geomap.gif http://www.calflora.net/southafrica/rainfall.html © Project SOUND 7
  8. 8. 1/4/2014 Many well-known gardens in South Africa  As here, botanic gardens are often associated with universities or large cities  But some the most famous – and oldest/youngest – are unique  Combine aspects of botanic gardens with nature preserves – they are literally ‘gardens within preserves’ – much like Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden North-West University Botanical Garden © Project SOUND South Africa: Biodiversity ‘hotspot’ http://www.friendsreunited.com/kirstenbosch-national-botanical-garden-cape-town/Memory/1c37c8a0-cb83-4625-8888-a127008a6e31 Biomes of South Africa  South Africa is one of the most biologically diverse countries in the world, after Indonesia and Brazil.  Occupies only about 2% of the world's land area, but is home to nearly: 10% of the world's plants; 7% of the reptiles, birds and mammals and 15% of known coastal marine species. © Project SOUND savannah Succulent karoo Thicket  9 biomes (unique vegetation landscapes), 3 of which have been declared global biodiversity hotspots. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aloe_succotrina Fynbos © Project SOUND Nama karoo Grassland © Project SOUND http://www.ekapa.ioisa.org.za/biomes/intro.htm#2 8
  9. 9. 1/4/2014 South Africa’s National Botanic Gardens Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden  One of the world’s great botanic gardens.  9 National Botanical Gardens  Now managed by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI).  Location: against the eastern slopes of Cape Town’s Table Mountain.  The focus is: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:South_Africa-PretoriaNational_Botanical_Gardens03.jpg  Growing and conserving South Africa’s indigenous plants http://www.soccerphile.com/soccerphile/wc2010/city_guide/kirstenbosch.html  Conserving natural vegetation and associated biodiversity within their boundaries  Was the first botanic garden in the world to be devoted to a country's indigenous flora.  Promoting and raising environmental awareness in South Africa and abroad. http://justcallmegertie.wordpress.com/tag/hantam-national-botanical-garden/  Established in 1913 to promote, conserve and display the rich and diverse flora of southern Africa © Project SOUND © Project SOUND http://ecoaffect.org/2012/07/25/4-out-of-8-worlds-most-amazing-botanical-gardens-areapga-members/ Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden http://annabengan.blogspot.com/2012/07/kirstenbosch-national-botanical-garden.html Kirstenbosch displays a wide variety of the unique plant life of the Cape Flora (the fynbos), as well as plants from all the diverse regions of southern Africa. © Project SOUND Kirstenbosch is part of a nature reserve. The 36 hectare garden is part of a 528 hectare (1300 acre) estate that contains protected mountainside supporting natural forest and fynbos along with a variety of animals and birds. The Kirstenbosch Estate borders the Table Mountain National Park. © Project SOUND 9
  10. 10. 1/4/2014 Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden Lessons from the Kirstenbosch 30-60 inches of rain – more like N. CA coast http://toptravellists.net/table-mountain-and-kirstenbosch-national-botanical-gardens-cape-town-south-africa.html Kirstenbosch lies in the heart of the Cape Floristic Region. In 2004, the Cape Floristic Region, including Kirstenbosch, was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site © Project SOUND 2. Using colorful flowers to best advantage http://www.cape-town-tourism.za.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/01300735.jpg 1) Importance of accenting unique native species © Project SOUND The ‘essence’ of sophisticated gardening is to capture the ‘spirit’ of the natural world in which we live - and bring it home http://www.neverstoptraveling.com/south-africa-the-other-side-of-the-table-mountain © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 10
  11. 11. 1/4/2014 Bringing Nature Home http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large/california-poppieslupines-rich-reid.jpg Desert Candle in the Mojave Desert  First we need to develop a deep understanding of the natural landscape  Then we must determine the ‘essence’ of what makes our California landscape unique  Only then can we apply traditional principles for ‘bringing nature home’ © Project SOUND Four lessons on color from the Kirstenbosch http://forums.backpacker.com/cgi-bin/forums/ikonboard.cgi?act=Print;f=8971047454;t=9991132727 Four lessons on color from the Kirstenbosch http://www.neverstoptraveling.com/south-africa-the-other-side-of-the-table-mountain http://www.123rf.com/photo_16347008_kirstenbosch-national-botanical-gardens-in-cape-townsouth-africa.html http://blog.sa-venues.com/provinces/western-cape/kirstenbosch-nationalbotanical-gardens/ 1. Limit the palette – a single species or color family © Project SOUND © Project SOUND http://blog.sa-venues.com/provinces/western-cape/kirstenbosch-national-botanical-gardens/ http://forums.backpacker.com/cgibin/forums/ikonboard.cgi?act=Print;f=8971047454;t=9991132727 2. Mass color for maximal effect - plant in swaths, drifts, instead of mixing many colors together © Project SOUND 11
  12. 12. 1/4/2014 Four lessons on color from the Kirstenbosch Four lessons on color from the Kirstenbosch http://blog.thomascook.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/South-AfricaKirstenbosch-Botanical-Gardens.jpg http://www.sanbi.org/gardens/kirstenbosch http://www.capetown.travel/blog/entry/blue_crowding_orange_at_kirstenbosch_flickr_pic_of_the_ day http://blog.sa-venues.com/provinces/western-cape/kirstenbosch-national-botanical-gardens/ 3. Plant densely: important both for aesthetics and for plant reproduction 4. Carefully plan color contrasts http://www.activetravels.com/blog/userfiles/image/IMG_6737(2).jpg http://tejonranch.com/wp-content/uploads/flower5.jpg © Project SOUND Douglas’ Meadowfoam – Limnanthes douglasii http://www.em.ca/garden/ann_limnanthes_douglasii.html © Project SOUND * White Meadowfoam – Limnanthes alba © Br. Alfred Brousseau, Saint Mary's College © Project SOUND 12
  13. 13. 1/4/2014 * White Meadowfoam – Limnanthes alba White Meadowfoam: dainty spring forbe  Vernal pools of Central Valley; also foothills of N/Central Sierras  Usually in seasonally moist, grassy places: Valley Grassland, Foothill Woodland, Yellow Pine Forest, wetland-riparian.  Ssp. : Limnanthes alba ssp. alba; ? Ssp. gracilis; ?  Size:   1-2 ft tall 1-2 ft wide  Growth form:   Ssp. parishii; Limnanthes alba ssp. versicolor  ‘Limnanthes’ means ‘marsh flower’ http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgibin/get_JM_treatment.pl?4945,4948,4949  Herbaceous annual Erect or reclining habit; most erect when massed Stems slender; one or more from base  Foliage:   Medium green; sparse Leaves finely dissected  Roots: ©2013 Debra L. Cook ©2012 Jean Pawek  Shallow roots; easy to transplant http://online.sfsu.edu/bholzman/courses/Fall01%20projects/sbee.htm © Project SOUND White flowers © Project SOUND Plant Requirements  Blooms:  Blooms as soils dry out; usually Feb-April in S. CA  Flowers:     Pure white with pale yellow centers; may become pale pink with age 5 petals have radiating veins Light sweet scent Attracts insect pollinators; not self-fertile (pollen released before female parts are receptive) so need multiple plants  Seeds: grown and pressed to  Soils:  Texture: poorly draining soils in nature; clays and others in garden  pH: any local  Light: full sun  Water: ©2012 Jean Pawek  Winter: moist soils; supplement as needed  Summer: taper off water as plants bloom  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils  Other: no mulch / gravel mulch for best reseeding; will tolerate a thin layer of organic mulch produce ‘Meadowfoam oil’ ©2011 Hattie Brown © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 13
  14. 14. 1/4/2014 White wildflowers: contrast The usefulness of white: contrast       ©2012 Jean Pawek http://www.plumjam.com/wildflowers/5-2013-Jenkinson/ http://blog.thomascook.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/South-AfricaKirstenbosch-Botanical-Gardens.jpg http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8225/8573032478_997b8c082b_z.jpg © Project SOUND http://img0.liveinternet.ru/images/attach/c/7/97/911/97911516_limnanthes_alba.jpg Good companions http://blog.anniesannuals.com/       Mark W. Skinner @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database Attractive pot plant; use a colored pot for maximum effect Massed – ‘sea of white’ Rain garden; dry swale Edging pathways With brightly colored wildflowers In vegetable garden – attracts insect pollinators & other beneficials; use also as ‘green manure’ http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/PLANT/PublishingImages/lg/cons_profile_liflgr_plant.jpg © Project SOUND Monterey Centaury – Zeltnera (Centaurium) muehlenbergii Douglas’ meadowfoam (yellow) Baby blue-eyes (blue) Any of the Goldfields (yellow) Ranunculus californicus (yellow) Zeltnera/Centaureum (pink) Linanthus spp. (pink) ©2009 Ron Wolf http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8225/8573032478_997b8c082b_z.jpg © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 14
  15. 15. 1/4/2014 Monterey Centaury – Zeltnera (Centaurium) The Gentian family: Gentianaceae muehlenbergii   http://www.wildflowersearch.com/search?oldstate=gloc% 3Az%3Bbloom%3AIgnore%3Bname%3AZeltnera+muehl enbergii In CA: N. and Central coast; foothills of N. CA  Moist areas in many communities: Sagebrush Scrub, Redwood Forest, Mixed Evergreen Forest, Northern Oak Woodland, Foothill Woodland, Valley Grassland, Northern Juniper Woodland http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?4374,4375,4380  © Br. Alfred Brousseau, Saint Mary's College  Mostly herbaceous; some shrubs Western North America from British Columbia to CA, NV Previous names: Centaurium muehlenbergii ; Centaurium curvistamineum; Centaurium floribundum  Distribution – almost world-wide, though some species have very narrow distribution  Flowers: http://www.infoescola.com/plantas/familia-gentianaceae/  Uses:  Garden flowers – many quite lovely  Medicinal and flavoring plants © Project SOUND The ‘Centauries’: not 1 but 4 genera © Project SOUND Monterey Centaury  Size:    The new genus Zeltnera comprises 25 species mainly confined to California, Mexico, and Texas.    Herbaceous annual Slender, erect stems – usually branching Stems medium green, smooth  Foliage:  Schenkia comprises five species: Asia, Eurasia, north Africa, and a rare/endangered Hawaiian endemic.    The genus Centaurium s.s. consists of ca. 20 species of primarily Mediterranean distribution. © Project SOUND 1-3 ft tall (usually < 2) 1-3 ft wide (usually 1-2)  Growth form:  Gyrandra is a small genus with three species restricted to some areas of Mexico and Central America http://www.calflora.net/bloomingplants/canchalagua.html  Bisexual; usually insect pollinated  Commonly bell-shaped, in parts of 4 or 5  Fruit: often capsule   ©2004 Carol W. Witham Medium to pale green Leaves simple, opposite on stem and rather sparse Leaf shape: ovate Infusion of plants used for constipation by native peoples © Project SOUND 15
  16. 16. 1/4/2014 Garden-pretty flowers Plant Requirements  Blooms: in spring; usually Apr-   Flowers:     Full sun to light shade  Water: Bright pink (usual) to medium pink with white (yellow) centers Funnel-shaped; 5-petals Flowers in loose clusters, mostly above the foliage Very attractive;  Winter: needs good soil moisture  Summer: OK with some summer irrigation; withhold after flowering ceases  Fertilizer: none needed; some fertilizer will be tolerated fine  Seeds: ©2008 Neal Kramer  Texture: any – rocky to clay  pH: any local  Light: May in S. CA gardens   Soils:  Other: no deep organic mulches Many small seeds in dry capsules; re-seeds nicely © Project SOUND if you want it to re-seed. http://dennismarelli.net/2009-06-22_1%20Gentian%20cropped.jpg © Project SOUND Garden uses for Centauries  Natural prairie with Ranunculus californicus, Asclepias fascicularis, Sisyrinchium bellum and N. CA grasses  Mass for clouds of magenta color along pathways, near fences & walls  Under shrubs, including roses  Charming pot plants – either alone or in combination If your garden is a bit drier in summer ©2013 Margo Bors © Project SOUND http://www.santacruzmountainsecology.com/wp-content/uploads/Centaurium-muehlenbergiiMonterey-Centaury.jpg http://www.scmta-trails.org/050605-wilder/050605-wilder-0031.jpg © Project SOUND 16
  17. 17. 1/4/2014 Charming Centaury – Zeltnera venusta Charming Centaury – Zeltnera venusta  Widespread in foothills and coastal areas  Locally on Catalina Island  Santa Monica Mtns  San Gabriel & Desert mountains (foothills)  ?other locally  Relatively common on dry slopes and flats to about 3000 ft. elevation in:     Coastal sage scrub Chaparral Grasslands Foothill woodlands and pine forests http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?4374,4375,4382l © Project SOUND © Project SOUND Charming Centaury looks like an oldfashioned garden flower  Size:  6” to 2 ft tall  1 ft wide  Growth form: annual wildflower  Erect  Simple, open branching stem  Foliage:  Gray-green to blue-green; fresh looking  Leaves simple, narrow to oblong http://bfs.claremont.edu/biota/plants/centaurium.html  Charming Centaury provides a surprising spot of color among the drying grasses of summer © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 17
  18. 18. 1/4/2014 Flowers are fantastic Charming Centaury does well in a waterwise garden  Blooms:  Soils:  Late spring/summer  usually May-July in our area  Texture: any; well-drained slightly preferred  pH: any local  Flowers:  Light: full sun to light shade  Color: range from bright magenta to white  Water:  Five rose/magenta petals white at the base with a yellow throat; may or may not have dark magenta spots  Young plants: need good spring soil moisture  Summer: Zone 2 or 2-3 until flowering; then Zone 1  Anthers twist spirally after their pollen has been harvested http://www.timetotrack.com/jay/socal/cancha4.htm  Fertilizer: none needed © Project SOUND Charming Centaury in the garden © Project SOUND Native Californians valued Charming Centaury as a medicine plant  Use it, as in nature, in a natural prairie with Lupines, Poppies, Goldenrods and native grasses  Tea from leaves or flowers used for:  Note: interbreeds with other native Centauries – don’t plant if these grow naturally near your garden  Reducing fevers  Pneumonia  Viral illnesses  Mass for clouds of magenta color in early summer  Try it along pathways, near fences & walls  As always, native annuals make great pot plants – either alone or in combination © Project SOUND http://www.csuchico.edu/bccer/Ecosystem/FloraFauna/pics/Flora/Centaurium_ve nustum.jpg © Project SOUND 18
  19. 19. 1/4/2014 A burning question: to sow in pots or directly into the ground  Four lessons on color from the Kirstenbosch Charming Centaury seeds:  Many small seeds in dry, papery capsule  Easy to collect – just tap capsules to shake seeds into envelope or box  Advantages of starting annuals in pots:  Protection from bird predation  May be able to start earlier – give added warmth  Less seed waste; easier to control seedling rates, especially for smaller seeds  Easier to control soil water for delicate seedlings http://www.hazmac.biz/050829/050829CentauriumVenustum.html  Disadvantages:  Potential to disturb roots with transplanting  More work: have to transplant http://farm1.static.flickr.com/232/502812779_aa75744cda.jpg 1. Limit the palette – a single species or color family 2. Mass color for maximal effect - plant in swaths or drifts, instead of mixing many colors together 3. Plant densely 4. Carefully plan color contrasts © Project SOUND Four lessons on color from the Kirstenbosch © Project SOUND * Large-flower Linanthus – Leptosiphon (Linanthus) grandiflorus 1. Limit the palette – a single species or color family 2. Mass color for maximal effect - plant in swaths, instead of mixing many colors together 3. Plant densely 4. Carefully plan color contrasts © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 19
  20. 20. 1/4/2014 * Large-flower Linanthus – Leptosiphon (Linanthus) Large-flowers, small plant grandiflorus  Size:  N. and Central CA coast – Santa Barbara Co north  Full extend of distribution unclear – many populations extirpated  AKA ‘Mountain Phlox’ – nursery trade   1-2 ft tall 1 ft wide  Growth form:   http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?Linanthus grandiflorus   Herbaceous annual wildflower Mounded form along coast; may be more upright in garden Stems hairy, branched above Usually forms dense colonies  Foliage:    http://www.bayesianinvestor.com/pix/2010/hikes2010may.html ©2003 Michael Charters © Project SOUND © Br. Alfred Brousseau, Saint Mary's College Flowers: phlox lovely © Project SOUND Plant Requirements  Blooms: in late spring, usually Apr-July in western L.A. county     Soils:  Texture: well-drained best; sandy in nature  pH: any local  Light:  Flowers: ©2009 Barry Breckling Leaves unusual; narrowly divided Leaves in whorls around stem; at intervals Foliage is quite sparse  Full sun to part-shade; dappled sun fine Pink and white; often central are is white, pink outer Five fused petals; open funnel-form Sweetly scented – attract native bees, butterflies, hummingbirds  Water:  Winter: needs moist soils – supplement if needed  Summer: keep plants blooming with occasional summer water – Water Zone 2  Seeds: easy to grow  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils but will tolerate weak fertilizer  Other: gravel mulch or none is ©2009 Barry Breckling ©2013 John Doyen © Project SOUND best; thin organic mulch OK © Project SOUND 20
  21. 21. 1/4/2014 Using Linanthus     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptosiphon_grandiflorus  The gardens of Cordoba, Spain Excellent container plant – alone or with other annuals In part-shade under trees; naturalizes well With N. coastal grasses for a northern prairie Must have for: scented garden; pollinator garden Vegetable garden; under fruit trees http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Roman_Bridge,_C%C3%B3rdoba,_Espana.jpg http://www.lonelyplanet.com/maps/europe/spain/map_of_spain.jpg http://drystonegarden.com/index.php/2009/10/linanthus-grandiflorus/ © Project SOUND The climate of Corboda: hot and dry © Project SOUND Cordoba is well known for its patio gardens http://www.spainisculture.com/export/sites/cultura/multimedia/galerias/monumentos/palacio_vian a_cordoba_t1400131.jpg_1306973099.jpg http://www.rosstours.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/RP-Cordoba-courtyard-1_final.jpg http://www.inlandandalucia.com/CordobaInfo.aspx Gardens reflect the climate – and Moorish and Roman gardening traditions © Project SOUND http://cache.desktopnexus.com/thumbnails/1467585-bigthumbnail.jpg http://www.piccavey.com/cordoba-patios-palacio-viana/ Project SOUND © 21
  22. 22. 1/4/2014 Cordoba’s spring garden contest… 4 Lessons in color from Cordoba gardens http://zeitgeistinapetiole.wordpress.com/category/plants/ … over the top color http://lincolnbrody.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/a-weekend-incordoba/ http://www.spain-holiday.com/blog/the-crosses-of-may-come-to-cordoba.php 1. Use containers to provide seasonal color © Project SOUND 4 Lessons in color from Cordoba gardens © Project SOUND 4 Lessons in color from Cordoba gardens http://www.rosstours.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/RP-Cordoba-courtyard-1_final.jpg http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/06/greathomesanddestinations/patios-as-a-competitive-sport-itmust-be-cordoba.html?_r=0 http://lincolnbrody.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/a-weekend-incordoba/ http://nature.desktopnexus.com/wallpaper/1448746/ 3. Use hardscape to provide additional color, contrast 2. Limit the color palette © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 22
  23. 23. 1/4/2014 4 Lessons in color from Cordoba gardens * Red Ribbons – Clarkia concinna 4. Choose colors that support your aim: hot, exciting brights or cool, soothing pastels Gerald and Buff Corsi © California Academy of Sciences © Project SOUND © Project SOUND * Red Ribbons – Clarkia concinna Red Ribbons: Clarkia characteristics  Endemic to California - low-elevation mountains/foothills of the N. CA  Mixed Evergreen Forest, Northern Oak Woodland, Douglas-Fir Forest, CSS – sea level to 4000 ft or so  Three sub-species: ssp. automixa; ssp. concinna; ssp. raichei  Size:  1-2 ft tall  1-2 ft wide  Growth form:    http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?5263,5341,5358 Herbaceous annual Upright habit Slender appearance  Foliage:   © Br. Alfred Brousseau, Saint Mary's College http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CLCO © Project SOUND ©2009 Terry Dye Medium green; sometimes red-tinged Leaves more rounded than other clarkia © Project SOUND 23
  24. 24. 1/4/2014 Flowers: very showy Plant Requirements  Blooms:  Spring or early summer; April to June or July (like elegant Clarkia)  Magenta or pink Petals are deeply lobed – quite unusual for a Clarkia  Sepals are thin, dark – like ‘red ribbons’  Super pretty and unique; and dependable like all Clarkias   ©2008 Doreen L. Smith  Seeds:   © Project SOUND Brighten up your shade       Best in part-shade: dappled sun, high shade under trees, morning sun.  Water:  Winter: adequate for young seedlings  Summer: taper off when flowering wanes  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils Many small seeds in capsule Harvest flowering stems, invert in paper bag and let dry ©2008 Ron Wolf  Texture: just about any; well-drained best  pH: any local  Light:  Flowers: ©2012 Jason Matthias Mills  Soils:  Other: gravel mulch promotes re-seeding © Project SOUND © Br. Alfred Brousseau, Saint Mary's College 4 Lessons in color from Cordoba gardens For a brilliant show under trees Mid-bed for shady mixed beds Color bowls on shady porches Hanging baskets Seeds are edible – parch Attracts hummingbirds! ©2006 Matt Below http://heynatives.blogspot.com/2010/01/waiting-for-wildflowers.html http://camissonia.blogspot.com/2010_05_01_archive.html http://tmousecmouse.blogspot.com/2013_04_01_archive.html © Br. Alfred Brousseau, Saint Mary's College 1. Use containers to provide seasonal color 2. Limit the color palette ©2000 Joseph Dougherty/ecology.org © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 24
  25. 25. 1/4/2014 4 Lessons in color from Cordoba gardens * Mountain Collomia/Large-flowered Phlox Collomia grandiflora http://www.piccavey.com/cordoba-patios-palacio-viana/ http://montanawildlifegardener.blogspot.com/2012/ 07/some-other-things-flowering-in-garden.html 3. Use hardscape to provide additional color, contrast 4. Choose colors that support your aim: hot brights or cool, refeshing pastels ©2005 Victoria Marshall © Project SOUND * Mountain Collomia/Large-flowered Phlox © Project SOUND Mountain Collomia: simple herbaceous plant Collomia grandiflora  Size:    Western N. America, including foothills and Mtns of CA (west of Sierras)  Locally: San Gabriel & Liebre mtns  Known in nursery trade as ‘Largeflowered Phlox’; AKA ‘Grand Collomia’ 1-3 ft tall 1 ft wide  Growth form:    Herbaceous annual Upright habit; robust stem may be branched at top Stem usually hairy & may be red  Foliage: http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?5654,5662,5664    ©2006 Steven Thorsted ©2013 Jean Pawek © Project SOUND ©2009 Gary A. Monroe Leaves medium green; lance-shaped or linear Simple, alternate Infusion of leaves/stalks taken for constipation and to "clean out your system.".  Roots: long taproot © Project SOUND http://www.yosemitehikes.com/wildflowers/large-flowered-collomia/gallerly-leaf.htm 25
  26. 26. 1/4/2014 Flowers: wonderful! Plant Requirements  Texture: most  pH: any local  Blooms: in late spring – usually  Light: April to May or even June  Full sun to part-shade [some shade is better in many gardens]  Flowers:   ©2006 Steven Thorsted Shades of salmon orange Flowers trumpet-shaped with 5 petals  Water:  Winter: needs moist soil  Summer: let plants dry out to promote flowering and seed production  Flowers in dense to loose cluster at top of stem  Distinctive blue pollen  Seeds:    Soils:  Fertilizer: none needed. Fine Fruit a dry capsule with sticky seeds Re-seeds well - Invasive in Middle East, Mediterranean with poor soils, but will grow bigger with a little fertilizer  Other: no mulch or gravel mulch © Project SOUND Large-flower phlox    Excellent addition to mixed flower bed – nice color In a ‘meadow’ with local mountain grasses, annuals As an attractive container plant; a lovely soft combination with white-flowered annuals © Project SOUND We’ve come to the end of our ‘accent on annuals’ ©2012 Steven Perry http://www.anniesannuals.com/plt_lst/lists/general/lst.gen.a sp?prodid=249 ©2009 Barry Breckling © Clayton J. Antieau © 2008, G. D. Carr http://www.scmta-trails.org/050605-wilder/050605-wilder-0031.jpg © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 26
  27. 27. 1/4/2014 We’ve ‘visited’ some interesting gardens Lessons from some great mediterranean climate gardens 1. Limit the palette – a single species or color family 2. Choose colors that support your aim: hot brights or cool pastels 3. Mass color for maximal effect - plant in swaths or clumps, instead of mixing many colors together 4. Plant densely – in pots of in the ground 5. Carefully plan color contrasts – including contrasts with hardscape 6. Use containers to provide seasonal color 7. Use hardscape to provide additional color, contrast http://www.pinterest.com/jlviles/porches-patios/ http://www.jasonelk.com/2013/01/its-a-beautiful-day-at-harold-porter-botanicalgarden-in-bettys-bay/ © Project SOUND What do you think of when you picture a wildflower garden? http://gardenersbasement.com/planting-a-wild-flower-garden/ http://tejonranch.com/wp-content/uploads/flower5.jpg http://californianativegardendesign.blogspot.com/2011/05/sowing-california-nativewildflowers.html © Project SOUND © Project SOUND It’s not too late to plant some annual wildflowers © Project SOUND 27
  28. 28. 1/4/2014 The annual wildflowers are a bit slow this year Come next month for ‘Botany for Gardeners’ © Project SOUND © Project SOUND 28

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