Assessing transformation: Curriculum Delivery Programme Meeting May09 Helen Beetham (Lou McGill, Synthesis Consultant)
Aims: for you to... <ul><li>articulate starting points for assessing transformation, relative to the synthesis framework <...
The role of synthesis <ul><li>'Make sense' of the programme as a whole – it's lessons, themes, key achievements, significa...
Technology: the vision <ul><li>Joined-up processes, single data entry for course related information </li></ul><ul><li>Int...
What do we hope to transform (specifically)? <ul><li>Can answer this question in relation to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>projec...
Activity – in project teams <ul><li>What transformations do you hope to bring about or accelerate or influence? </li></ul>
Examples: project goals (enhancement) <ul><li>Enhanced: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creativity and innovation in delivery </li><...
Examples: project goals (transformation) <ul><li>Transformed institutional systems (human and technical) </li></ul><ul><li...
Features of 'transformation' <ul><li>Sustained (over time) </li></ul><ul><li>Embedded (into context) </li></ul><ul><li>Tra...
So in assessing transformation: <ul><li>How have things changed? (qualitative/descriptive) </li></ul><ul><li>Was change in...
Activity – in project teams <ul><li>How would you know this had happened? </li></ul><ul><li>Whose experience would be diff...
Problems with assessing 'transformation' <ul><li>'an emergent property of project interventions...' </li></ul><ul><li>Like...
Activity – in project teams <ul><li>What evidence could you gather to help assess transformation? </li></ul><ul><li>What f...
Tools and approaches that can help <ul><li>'real-life' narrative: case study, story </li></ul><ul><li>'illustrative' narra...
Curriculum: what does it look like? <ul><li>module handbook </li></ul><ul><li>reading list </li></ul><ul><li>assessments  ...
Learning activity triangle Outcomes:   New knowledge, skills and abilities; evidence of these; artefacts produced Learners...
Discussion: linking management  and measurement of change <ul><li>Aligning agendas means listening to stakeholders – which...
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May 09 - Delivery baselining session may09

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  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • It may seem obvious what we are talking about when we say &apos;the curriculum&apos;, but is it? In your groups, discuss what you think the &lt;subject&gt; curriculum is. Feed back a short definition in five minutes&apos; time. At this workshop, we identified that the term &apos;transferable skills&apos; was very important to the course team when talking about the curriculum. Therefore after listening to feedback from the three groups, we put this term up and asked them to elaborate on it. Fortunately they had all come up with definitions which included this term, or something like it. This might be an opportunity to explore differences among the stakeholder group perceptions, and/or differences between their perceptions and how the curriculum is described in formal documentation. Put their definitions in the centre of your curriculum map.
  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • It may seem obvious what we are talking about when we say &apos;the curriculum&apos;, but is it? In your groups, discuss what you think the &lt;subject&gt; curriculum is. Feed back a short definition in five minutes&apos; time. At this workshop, we identified that the term &apos;transferable skills&apos; was very important to the course team when talking about the curriculum. Therefore after listening to feedback from the three groups, we put this term up and asked them to elaborate on it. Fortunately they had all come up with definitions which included this term, or something like it. This might be an opportunity to explore differences among the stakeholder group perceptions, and/or differences between their perceptions and how the curriculum is described in formal documentation. Put their definitions in the centre of your curriculum map.
  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • It may seem obvious what we are talking about when we say &apos;the curriculum&apos;, but is it? In your groups, discuss what you think the &lt;subject&gt; curriculum is. Feed back a short definition in five minutes&apos; time. At this workshop, we identified that the term &apos;transferable skills&apos; was very important to the course team when talking about the curriculum. Therefore after listening to feedback from the three groups, we put this term up and asked them to elaborate on it. Fortunately they had all come up with definitions which included this term, or something like it. This might be an opportunity to explore differences among the stakeholder group perceptions, and/or differences between their perceptions and how the curriculum is described in formal documentation. Put their definitions in the centre of your curriculum map.
  • Colour coding is important so you can track what has been added to the curriculum map by which stakeholders, but obviously you can choose your own colours. For each stakeholder group you will need stickies or post-it notes, a couple of sheets of A3 paper, and some strips (long side of an A4 sheet in length), all in the same colour. You will also need marker pens and blu-tac. Customise the &apos;professionals&apos; category so it is suitable for the subject(s) you are working with, e.g. employers, professional body, clinicians, client groups. Explain that you will be building a map of curriculum processes. You will explain what that means as you go along. For now it is enough that they understand they are there as representatives of a wider group of people. Although you are asking them to speak &apos;as themselves&apos; you are also asking them to imagine how other students, professionals etc might feel about these issues. Don&apos;t forget to emphasise that the aim of the workshop is for you to get a clear picture of how they experience the curriculum. They are working for the project, though you hope the process will also be interesting to them.
  • You can note at this stage that the map still feels quite abstract, and it&apos;s difficult to get a feel for how these processes are actually made real or represented. Again you can use these (or adapted) examples to give a feel for what you mean by &apos;made real&apos;, i.e. the materials through which the curriculum is communicated by one set of stakeholders to another. In this example we were particularly interested in how &apos;transferable skills&apos; were represented, because that was the key definition of the curriculum, but the words used and actual artefacts may differ.
  • At this point talk the workshop through the outline curriculum process map you have displayed on the wall. Show that you have put on a couple of processes, but that these can be removed or changed if they want. Give them five minutes to discuss in groups again, then ask them to begin adding their own processes to the map, using the coloured strips and pens provided. Give time for the three groups to see and discuss each other&apos;s contributions. Make sure you acknowledge and give feedback on the emerging map, emphasising that they are helping you add a lot of detail you could not know as an outsider. The course team in particular may try to modify the triangle with other stakeholders and processes at this point – allow them to do as they want but don&apos;t forget to ask questions and acknowledge what they are saying in a positive way.
  • Once again, ask groups to discuss and write down on the stickies or post-it notes the different ways in which the curriculum is communicated to or by them. Then ask them to add these to the map, if possible relating artefacts to processes. Once again, give feedback on how valuable this is. Do not be afraid to move items around the map and query whether this is what the curriculum looks like. By this point some differences of opinion or viewpoint may have emerged. Allow space for these but try to deal briefly and constructively with them, emphasising that the next section will allow them to talk about what they would like to change. This is a good point to break for tea or coffee
  • May 09 - Delivery baselining session may09

    1. 1. Assessing transformation: Curriculum Delivery Programme Meeting May09 Helen Beetham (Lou McGill, Synthesis Consultant)
    2. 2. Aims: for you to... <ul><li>articulate starting points for assessing transformation, relative to the synthesis framework </li></ul><ul><li>explore some tools/frameworks for assessing transformation </li></ul><ul><li>identify opportunities for gathering evidence in your project plan </li></ul>
    3. 3. The role of synthesis <ul><li>'Make sense' of the programme as a whole – it's lessons, themes, key achievements, significance </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate this to key audiences & stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Involve projects in developing the 'big picture' </li></ul><ul><li>Help you keep it in view as you report on: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Outcomes of activities (and any evidence of the quality, impact etc of those outcomes) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lessons learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transformation (actions and evidence) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Baseline report (part of first interim report) </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Technology: the vision <ul><li>Joined-up processes, single data entry for course related information </li></ul><ul><li>Interoperability/exchange (where relevant) of course-related information, learner information, time and location constraints... </li></ul><ul><li>Support for flexible, modular curricula and credit transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Support for educational design and curriculum planning </li></ul><ul><li>Support for reflection on the learning process </li></ul><ul><li>Provide data on learners and cohorts to support responsive teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Capture relationships between e.g. courses, outcomes/competences and assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Enable effective sharing and repurposing of units of learning </li></ul>
    5. 5. What do we hope to transform (specifically)? <ul><li>Can answer this question in relation to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>project goals (in what direction do we want things to change?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>stakeholder benefits (who wants/needs what to happen?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the original challenge(s) (what needs to work better, and why?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the counterfactual (what would happen if we did nothing?) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NB: the context will change, and transformation is an emergent property of project interventions </li></ul>
    6. 6. Activity – in project teams <ul><li>What transformations do you hope to bring about or accelerate or influence? </li></ul>
    7. 7. Examples: project goals (enhancement) <ul><li>Enhanced: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creativity and innovation in delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexibility and responsiveness in delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student achievement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student engagement with learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student engagement with feedback/assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff skills in pedagogy/learning design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff experience of teaching/assessing </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Examples: project goals (transformation) <ul><li>Transformed institutional systems (human and technical) </li></ul><ul><li>Changes to institutional learning and teaching agenda, policy, commitments </li></ul><ul><li>Learners (and other stakeholder) perspectives embedded into feedback and evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>(sustained, embedded) innovations in practice leading to responsive and flexible delivery </li></ul><ul><li>Influence on educational research and practice </li></ul><ul><li>Changes to learner goals and progression routes </li></ul><ul><li>Social justice e.g. access, participation </li></ul>
    9. 9. Features of 'transformation' <ul><li>Sustained (over time) </li></ul><ul><li>Embedded (into context) </li></ul><ul><li>Transferred (across contexts) </li></ul><ul><li>Evident in policies, processes and systems </li></ul><ul><li>Articulates values and influences agendas </li></ul>
    10. 10. So in assessing transformation: <ul><li>How have things changed? (qualitative/descriptive) </li></ul><ul><li>Was change in the desired direction? (evaluative) </li></ul><ul><li>How much have things changed? (quantitative – not always possible ) </li></ul><ul><li>How is it for stakeholders? (participative) </li></ul><ul><li>The situation at two points in time (comparative) </li></ul>
    11. 11. Activity – in project teams <ul><li>How would you know this had happened? </li></ul><ul><li>Whose experience would be different, and how? </li></ul><ul><li>What might it look like if this failed to happen, or happened differently? </li></ul>
    12. 12. Problems with assessing 'transformation' <ul><li>'an emergent property of project interventions...' </li></ul><ul><li>Likely to be uneven, 'lumpy' </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-factoral: 'success is a child with many parents' </li></ul><ul><li>Rhetorical: buzz-words change, agendas shift, new champions emerge, initiatives need successes </li></ul><ul><li>Political: power relations are unavoidable </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-disciplinary (messy): people, technologies, institutions... </li></ul>
    13. 13. Activity – in project teams <ul><li>What evidence could you gather to help assess transformation? </li></ul><ul><li>What frameworks, tools or methods might be helpful? </li></ul>
    14. 14. Tools and approaches that can help <ul><li>'real-life' narrative: case study, story </li></ul><ul><li>'illustrative' narrative: day in the life, walk-through, scenario </li></ul><ul><li>Process models (baseline + closing) </li></ul><ul><li>Benchmarking-type tools (baseline + closing) </li></ul><ul><li>Tools specific to learning theory/transformational challenge of your project (e.g. activity theory) </li></ul><ul><li>Using familiar stakeholder tools/technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Many others... </li></ul>
    15. 15. Curriculum: what does it look like? <ul><li>module handbook </li></ul><ul><li>reading list </li></ul><ul><li>assessments </li></ul><ul><li>new skills </li></ul><ul><li>guidance from tutor/mentor </li></ul><ul><li>pebblepad entry? </li></ul>competence framework e-portfolios CPD requirements skill sets of graduates competence framework course/module validation document course materials
    16. 16. Learning activity triangle Outcomes: New knowledge, skills and abilities; evidence of these; artefacts produced Learners: Preferences, needs, motivations; prior skills, knowledge, abilities; modes of participating Artefacts Content resources; tools; affordances of the physical and virtual environment Other people: and the roles they play in the interaction: supporting, mediating, challenging, guiding Learning Activity Purposeful action leading to personal change
    17. 17. Discussion: linking management and measurement of change <ul><li>Aligning agendas means listening to stakeholders – which allows evidence to be collected </li></ul><ul><li>Where in your project plan are there opportunities to influence others? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are there opportunities to collect evidence? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the key lessons you hope to bring forward? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you monitor unexpected changes – and take advantage? </li></ul>

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