Challenges of social media with speaker notes

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Challenges of social media with speaker notes

  1. 1. Social Media Lessons, Challenges & Opportunities Dena Walker Digital Planner Irish International Wednesday 1 February 12 Hello. It’s really love to be here speaking to you today. I hope that I can keep you awake - I know it’s been a long day for you all. I was asked to come here today and talk to you about “Challenges, lessons and opportunities of Social Media”. I’ve taken that title quite loosely, so please don’t expect a load of boring lists about “here’s a challenge, here’s how you fix it”. I can promise you that when you go live in Social Media, if you’re not already, you will meet more challenges than I can predict here. Instead what I have aimed to do is tell you about some very core challenges associated with social media and what they mean for you - so that you’ll hopefully be able to tackle them effectively and go on to great things. I’ve got a couple of real life examples woven in too, which should hopefully be interesting.
  2. 2. Who am I? Digital Planner NOT a “social media guru” Wednesday 1 February 12 So, who am I? Well, I’m absolutely not a social media expert, guru, seeder, influencer or whatever buzz word you want to apply. Anyone that tells you that they are is a liar and I would advise you to steer clear. I’m just someone who uses social media, professionally and personally. My day job is looking at user behaviour and the marriage of that with technology, so that my clients can speak to their audience in the most relevant digital channel and format. Or as is often they case, not speak to them at all - just monitor social media, which is just as valuable and sometimes your best course of action.
  3. 3. Wednesday 1 February 12 you obviously know that “digital” is important, and here’s a taste of what is happening online in ONE MINUTE. Mad, no?!
  4. 4. What does “social media” mean? Wednesday 1 February 12 Social media is a plethora of channels, across a range of platforms. All enabling users to SHARE. That’s really what makes social media special - sharing. It’s that simple. Sharing can be great for your organisation if it’s stuff you want to get shared. And not so great when it’s the stuff you don’t. It’s a double-edged knife that way. But understand the users - their channel specific behaviours, general digital behaviours, and their motivations etc is what will get you ahead in social media.
  5. 5. What does “social media” mean? Wednesday 1 February 12 Social media is a plethora of channels, across a range of platforms. All enabling users to SHARE. That’s really what makes social media special - sharing. It’s that simple. Sharing can be great for your organisation if it’s stuff you want to get shared. And not so great when it’s the stuff you don’t. It’s a double-edged knife that way. But understand the users - their channel specific behaviours, general digital behaviours, and their motivations etc is what will get you ahead in social media.
  6. 6. What does “social media” mean? Online technologies and networks that people use to share opinions insights, experiences and perspectives with each other Wednesday 1 February 12 Social media is a plethora of channels, across a range of platforms. All enabling users to SHARE. That’s really what makes social media special - sharing. It’s that simple. Sharing can be great for your organisation if it’s stuff you want to get shared. And not so great when it’s the stuff you don’t. It’s a double-edged knife that way. But understand the users - their channel specific behaviours, general digital behaviours, and their motivations etc is what will get you ahead in social media.
  7. 7. Image Source: Gapingvoid.com Wednesday 1 February 12 Emerging tech has brought about massive social media adoption- smart phones driving it further. But what it’s also done is change our behaviour. After 100 yrs of being told what to think/feel/believe about brands we don’t trust them anymore. We’ve all been let down by a brand or organisation at one time or another, so why should we take it all at face value? No. Nowadays we want to question, challenge, discuss what we’re told before we’re willing to believe.
  8. 8. Image Source: Sokleine on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 What Social Media has really done is demonstrate how empowered our audience has become. They have just the same tools at their disposal as we do. And in a lot of cases, they know better than we do, how to use them! To get them to spend their time with us (ie give us their attention) we need to have a genuine story to tell - one that’s relevant to them. But they don’t want to just listen to our stories, people want to have a conversation with us about them. As with any good conversation we must also listen more than we speak - get to know your audience - what they feel, what their motivations are and what you can do for them. Don’t say just anything. Maybe even say nothing - don’t ever forget that just as TV or outdoor or Direct Mail might not be the right medium for your messaging, such is the case with social media! Sometimes, listening might be all you do.
  9. 9. An empowered audience Having a story to tell Listening more than you talk Being relevant Two-way conversation Image Source: Sokleine on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 What Social Media has really done is demonstrate how empowered our audience has become. They have just the same tools at their disposal as we do. And in a lot of cases, they know better than we do, how to use them! To get them to spend their time with us (ie give us their attention) we need to have a genuine story to tell - one that’s relevant to them. But they don’t want to just listen to our stories, people want to have a conversation with us about them. As with any good conversation we must also listen more than we speak - get to know your audience - what they feel, what their motivations are and what you can do for them. Don’t say just anything. Maybe even say nothing - don’t ever forget that just as TV or outdoor or Direct Mail might not be the right medium for your messaging, such is the case with social media! Sometimes, listening might be all you do.
  10. 10. Wednesday 1 February 12 Don’t get me wrong, social media is awesome. When it’s done right it has the power to be a phenomenally powerful messaging channel for you. But it’s not a panacea. I can’t stress this enough - Social Media should always be considered when you’re developing your communications strategies, but don’t be afraid to rule it out if it doesn’t feel right. Because when you’re in it, you’re committed. It’s like a marriage - you can’t be half married. You’re in or you’re out. if you’re in, do it well and the rewards can be great.
  11. 11. (I’m WAY over stating it, but it can be pretty cool!) Wednesday 1 February 12 Don’t get me wrong, social media is awesome. When it’s done right it has the power to be a phenomenally powerful messaging channel for you. But it’s not a panacea. I can’t stress this enough - Social Media should always be considered when you’re developing your communications strategies, but don’t be afraid to rule it out if it doesn’t feel right. Because when you’re in it, you’re committed. It’s like a marriage - you can’t be half married. You’re in or you’re out. if you’re in, do it well and the rewards can be great.
  12. 12. So, what should you know before you start? Image Source: An Untrained Eye on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 Social media is not without its limitations. These are the biggest challenges you’ll face with it - people think it’s a magic bullet. It isn’t. When you know and understand the challenges, you can address them.
  13. 13. The limitations of social media Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 1. Control Just ask BP or Nestle or Eurostar! You need to “manage” a situation. You’ll never be able to control it. 2. Tool Ticklist - FB? Tick. Twitter? Tick. YouTube? Tick. Blog? Tick. You will FAIL!
  14. 14. The limitations of social media 1. You don’t control your brand Users own social media, not brands People will give you exactly what they think you deserve If your motivation is to enforce control, STOP! You will fail Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 1. Control Just ask BP or Nestle or Eurostar! You need to “manage” a situation. You’ll never be able to control it. 2. Tool Ticklist - FB? Tick. Twitter? Tick. YouTube? Tick. Blog? Tick. You will FAIL!
  15. 15. The limitations of social media 1. You don’t control your brand Users own social media, not brands People will give you exactly what they think you deserve If your motivation is to enforce control, STOP! You will fail 2. It is nothing more than a tool It is not about ticking off a list Figure out what your story is Make it a story based on truth Tell your story, before someone else does Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 1. Control Just ask BP or Nestle or Eurostar! You need to “manage” a situation. You’ll never be able to control it. 2. Tool Ticklist - FB? Tick. Twitter? Tick. YouTube? Tick. Blog? Tick. You will FAIL!
  16. 16. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Wednesday 1 February 12 The internet has a LONG memory. When you say nothing you’re at the mercy of Google and co. While Social Media is very popular and people spend a lot of time with it - Search is still king! In late 2008 there was an Irish Pork scare. THREE YEARS LATER 3 out of the top 5 search results for Irish Pork are about the scare. Given that barely anyone goes “below the fold” when they’re searching for information - this means that people are going to get some pretty conflicting information about Irish pork. Any organisation that finds themselves in this situation will end up leaving your consumer/customer/audience confused - if what they see in search results conflicts with what you’re telling them, will that make them trust you any better? Maybe not. Probably not. It’ll make them question it at least. By not being there to inform and manage the situation there you’re giving yourself a mountain to climb when you do start - it takes time to climb up search rankings! You also stand to lose a LOT of money!
  17. 17. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Over THREE years later! Wednesday 1 February 12 The internet has a LONG memory. When you say nothing you’re at the mercy of Google and co. While Social Media is very popular and people spend a lot of time with it - Search is still king! In late 2008 there was an Irish Pork scare. THREE YEARS LATER 3 out of the top 5 search results for Irish Pork are about the scare. Given that barely anyone goes “below the fold” when they’re searching for information - this means that people are going to get some pretty conflicting information about Irish pork. Any organisation that finds themselves in this situation will end up leaving your consumer/customer/audience confused - if what they see in search results conflicts with what you’re telling them, will that make them trust you any better? Maybe not. Probably not. It’ll make them question it at least. By not being there to inform and manage the situation there you’re giving yourself a mountain to climb when you do start - it takes time to climb up search rankings! You also stand to lose a LOT of money!
  18. 18. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Surrender ANY control Leave your consumer confused Relinquish your “right to reply” Set yourself back Lose money! Wednesday 1 February 12 The internet has a LONG memory. When you say nothing you’re at the mercy of Google and co. While Social Media is very popular and people spend a lot of time with it - Search is still king! In late 2008 there was an Irish Pork scare. THREE YEARS LATER 3 out of the top 5 search results for Irish Pork are about the scare. Given that barely anyone goes “below the fold” when they’re searching for information - this means that people are going to get some pretty conflicting information about Irish pork. Any organisation that finds themselves in this situation will end up leaving your consumer/customer/audience confused - if what they see in search results conflicts with what you’re telling them, will that make them trust you any better? Maybe not. Probably not. It’ll make them question it at least. By not being there to inform and manage the situation there you’re giving yourself a mountain to climb when you do start - it takes time to climb up search rankings! You also stand to lose a LOT of money!
  19. 19. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Wednesday 1 February 12 By saying nothing you’re allowing everyone else the freedom to say whatever they like. If you get involved you can at least try to nip a problem in the bud. Or turn a bad situation to your advantage. When the ripples are good ones, instead of a crisis, you can even make a good one better! But you have a duty to exercise your right to reply. Especially when you’re dealing with public service information - trust in govt and pubic sector has never been lower. It’s imperative that correct information is out there! If you don’t have a social media presence in a channel where something is “breaking” - then see if you can get information to the most influential of those involved. Preferably the ones that are defending you (if there are). Or perhaps just agree to meet with the influential detractors offline - work to make them advocates... or at least less vehement detractors. Whatever you do, don’t ignore social media.
  20. 20. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price CRISIS HITS 0 Hour Wednesday 1 February 12 By saying nothing you’re allowing everyone else the freedom to say whatever they like. If you get involved you can at least try to nip a problem in the bud. Or turn a bad situation to your advantage. When the ripples are good ones, instead of a crisis, you can even make a good one better! But you have a duty to exercise your right to reply. Especially when you’re dealing with public service information - trust in govt and pubic sector has never been lower. It’s imperative that correct information is out there! If you don’t have a social media presence in a channel where something is “breaking” - then see if you can get information to the most influential of those involved. Preferably the ones that are defending you (if there are). Or perhaps just agree to meet with the influential detractors offline - work to make them advocates... or at least less vehement detractors. Whatever you do, don’t ignore social media.
  21. 21. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Hour 6 Twitter Blogs FacebookCRISIS HITS 0 Hour Wednesday 1 February 12 By saying nothing you’re allowing everyone else the freedom to say whatever they like. If you get involved you can at least try to nip a problem in the bud. Or turn a bad situation to your advantage. When the ripples are good ones, instead of a crisis, you can even make a good one better! But you have a duty to exercise your right to reply. Especially when you’re dealing with public service information - trust in govt and pubic sector has never been lower. It’s imperative that correct information is out there! If you don’t have a social media presence in a channel where something is “breaking” - then see if you can get information to the most influential of those involved. Preferably the ones that are defending you (if there are). Or perhaps just agree to meet with the influential detractors offline - work to make them advocates... or at least less vehement detractors. Whatever you do, don’t ignore social media.
  22. 22. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Hour 12 Sharing Mass Media Hour 6 Twitter Blogs FacebookCRISIS HITS 0 Hour Wednesday 1 February 12 By saying nothing you’re allowing everyone else the freedom to say whatever they like. If you get involved you can at least try to nip a problem in the bud. Or turn a bad situation to your advantage. When the ripples are good ones, instead of a crisis, you can even make a good one better! But you have a duty to exercise your right to reply. Especially when you’re dealing with public service information - trust in govt and pubic sector has never been lower. It’s imperative that correct information is out there! If you don’t have a social media presence in a channel where something is “breaking” - then see if you can get information to the most influential of those involved. Preferably the ones that are defending you (if there are). Or perhaps just agree to meet with the influential detractors offline - work to make them advocates... or at least less vehement detractors. Whatever you do, don’t ignore social media.
  23. 23. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Hour 18 Hour 24 Mainstream Editorial Hour 12 Sharing Mass Media Hour 6 Twitter Blogs FacebookCRISIS HITS 0 Hour Wednesday 1 February 12 By saying nothing you’re allowing everyone else the freedom to say whatever they like. If you get involved you can at least try to nip a problem in the bud. Or turn a bad situation to your advantage. When the ripples are good ones, instead of a crisis, you can even make a good one better! But you have a duty to exercise your right to reply. Especially when you’re dealing with public service information - trust in govt and pubic sector has never been lower. It’s imperative that correct information is out there! If you don’t have a social media presence in a channel where something is “breaking” - then see if you can get information to the most influential of those involved. Preferably the ones that are defending you (if there are). Or perhaps just agree to meet with the influential detractors offline - work to make them advocates... or at least less vehement detractors. Whatever you do, don’t ignore social media.
  24. 24. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Hour 12 Sharing Mass Media Hour 6 Twitter Blogs FacebookCRISIS HITS 0 Hour Wednesday 1 February 12 By saying nothing you’re allowing everyone else the freedom to say whatever they like. If you get involved you can at least try to nip a problem in the bud. Or turn a bad situation to your advantage. When the ripples are good ones, instead of a crisis, you can even make a good one better! But you have a duty to exercise your right to reply. Especially when you’re dealing with public service information - trust in govt and pubic sector has never been lower. It’s imperative that correct information is out there! If you don’t have a social media presence in a channel where something is “breaking” - then see if you can get information to the most influential of those involved. Preferably the ones that are defending you (if there are). Or perhaps just agree to meet with the influential detractors offline - work to make them advocates... or at least less vehement detractors. Whatever you do, don’t ignore social media.
  25. 25. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Hour 6 Twitter Blogs FacebookCRISIS HITS 0 Hour Wednesday 1 February 12 By saying nothing you’re allowing everyone else the freedom to say whatever they like. If you get involved you can at least try to nip a problem in the bud. Or turn a bad situation to your advantage. When the ripples are good ones, instead of a crisis, you can even make a good one better! But you have a duty to exercise your right to reply. Especially when you’re dealing with public service information - trust in govt and pubic sector has never been lower. It’s imperative that correct information is out there! If you don’t have a social media presence in a channel where something is “breaking” - then see if you can get information to the most influential of those involved. Preferably the ones that are defending you (if there are). Or perhaps just agree to meet with the influential detractors offline - work to make them advocates... or at least less vehement detractors. Whatever you do, don’t ignore social media.
  26. 26. Lesson One: Say nothing at a price Hour 6 Twitter Blogs FacebookCRISIS HITS 0 Hour Damage control Right to reply Less misinformation Potential advocacy Wednesday 1 February 12 By saying nothing you’re allowing everyone else the freedom to say whatever they like. If you get involved you can at least try to nip a problem in the bud. Or turn a bad situation to your advantage. When the ripples are good ones, instead of a crisis, you can even make a good one better! But you have a duty to exercise your right to reply. Especially when you’re dealing with public service information - trust in govt and pubic sector has never been lower. It’s imperative that correct information is out there! If you don’t have a social media presence in a channel where something is “breaking” - then see if you can get information to the most influential of those involved. Preferably the ones that are defending you (if there are). Or perhaps just agree to meet with the influential detractors offline - work to make them advocates... or at least less vehement detractors. Whatever you do, don’t ignore social media.
  27. 27. The limitations of social media 3. Reach does not mean attention Fans, followers, likers = people formerly known as the audience Potentially more valuable Potentially imaginary! DO NOT chase numbers – work to create advocates Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 3. Reach/attention Fans/followers/likes etc are just the social media equivalent of eyeballs pointed at the TV while your ad is on. It can mean more in social media though as the user as self-selected - i.e. given you permission to tell them your message. But you don’t know how many of those “eyeballs” are looking at your messaging. It’s easy to like a page on Facebook. It’s easy to hide one from your news feed too. 4. Winning advocates This takes time! Relationships aren’t built overnight. You might have some natural advocates - find them! Build relationships with them first. Then work with them to recruit more and build relationships with those too. Keep your promises and you’ll get more.
  28. 28. The limitations of social media 3. Reach does not mean attention Fans, followers, likers = people formerly known as the audience Potentially more valuable Potentially imaginary! DO NOT chase numbers – work to create advocates 4. Advocates are hard won Positive word of mouth is your holy grail You need advocates for this They’ll talk about you when: You over deliver You under deliver Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 3. Reach/attention Fans/followers/likes etc are just the social media equivalent of eyeballs pointed at the TV while your ad is on. It can mean more in social media though as the user as self-selected - i.e. given you permission to tell them your message. But you don’t know how many of those “eyeballs” are looking at your messaging. It’s easy to like a page on Facebook. It’s easy to hide one from your news feed too. 4. Winning advocates This takes time! Relationships aren’t built overnight. You might have some natural advocates - find them! Build relationships with them first. Then work with them to recruit more and build relationships with those too. Keep your promises and you’ll get more.
  29. 29. The limitations of social media 5. It requires some maths! Volume x impact = word of mouth Volume is easy Impact is determined by: Where What Who Source Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 5. Maths Volume = frequency of exposure to your social media activities Impact = action taken as a result of exposure to your social media activities 6. WOM Talkability is NOT a real thing. It’s not even a real word. Don’t go after “loads of mentions” for your initiative/organisation - work to get the RIGHT kind of mentions.
  30. 30. The limitations of social media 5. It requires some maths! Volume x impact = word of mouth Volume is easy Impact is determined by: Where What Who Source 6. Word of mouth is not a cure-all Do NOT chase “buzz” or “talkability” Negative versus positive word-of-mouth Understand different kinds of word-of-mouth Experiential Consequential Intentional Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 5. Maths Volume = frequency of exposure to your social media activities Impact = action taken as a result of exposure to your social media activities 6. WOM Talkability is NOT a real thing. It’s not even a real word. Don’t go after “loads of mentions” for your initiative/organisation - work to get the RIGHT kind of mentions.
  31. 31. The limitations of social media 7. It WILL cost you! Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 Culture = Trust and engagement is what social media is about. You won’t get this by paying lip service. People can smell disingenuousness a mile away. Your online, and social media, behaviour needs to be true to your culture. This might mean a cultural change - not an easy task! Good Ideas = they can come from anywhere. Not just your agency (I’m doing myself out of a job here!). GMP did a 24 hour tweetathon (as we’ll see later) to show people what they deal with in a single day. Great insight into an often maligned service that created community pride and engagement. Data = Get to know your audience. I’ll keep saying it. If you don’t know them what you say will be off target. It’ll have less impact and less effect.
  32. 32. The limitations of social media 7. It WILL cost you! Culture Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 Culture = Trust and engagement is what social media is about. You won’t get this by paying lip service. People can smell disingenuousness a mile away. Your online, and social media, behaviour needs to be true to your culture. This might mean a cultural change - not an easy task! Good Ideas = they can come from anywhere. Not just your agency (I’m doing myself out of a job here!). GMP did a 24 hour tweetathon (as we’ll see later) to show people what they deal with in a single day. Great insight into an often maligned service that created community pride and engagement. Data = Get to know your audience. I’ll keep saying it. If you don’t know them what you say will be off target. It’ll have less impact and less effect.
  33. 33. The limitations of social media 7. It WILL cost you! Culture Good Ideas Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 Culture = Trust and engagement is what social media is about. You won’t get this by paying lip service. People can smell disingenuousness a mile away. Your online, and social media, behaviour needs to be true to your culture. This might mean a cultural change - not an easy task! Good Ideas = they can come from anywhere. Not just your agency (I’m doing myself out of a job here!). GMP did a 24 hour tweetathon (as we’ll see later) to show people what they deal with in a single day. Great insight into an often maligned service that created community pride and engagement. Data = Get to know your audience. I’ll keep saying it. If you don’t know them what you say will be off target. It’ll have less impact and less effect.
  34. 34. The limitations of social media 7. It WILL cost you! Culture Good Ideas Data Partial Source: Measuring ROSI by BBDO Wednesday 1 February 12 Culture = Trust and engagement is what social media is about. You won’t get this by paying lip service. People can smell disingenuousness a mile away. Your online, and social media, behaviour needs to be true to your culture. This might mean a cultural change - not an easy task! Good Ideas = they can come from anywhere. Not just your agency (I’m doing myself out of a job here!). GMP did a 24 hour tweetathon (as we’ll see later) to show people what they deal with in a single day. Great insight into an often maligned service that created community pride and engagement. Data = Get to know your audience. I’ll keep saying it. If you don’t know them what you say will be off target. It’ll have less impact and less effect.
  35. 35. The biggest challenges? Image Source:Gizmodo Wednesday 1 February 12 One of your biggest challenges will be to get stakeholder engagement. You might experience technophobes and social media skeptics. You have to kill this with information. Information and experience - get them onto social media so they can see it for themselves.
  36. 36. The biggest challenges? Stakeholder engagement and buy-in Image Source:Gizmodo Wednesday 1 February 12 One of your biggest challenges will be to get stakeholder engagement. You might experience technophobes and social media skeptics. You have to kill this with information. Information and experience - get them onto social media so they can see it for themselves.
  37. 37. The biggest challenges? Stakeholder engagement and buy-in Resource and funding Image Source:Gizmodo Wednesday 1 February 12 One of your biggest challenges will be to get stakeholder engagement. You might experience technophobes and social media skeptics. You have to kill this with information. Information and experience - get them onto social media so they can see it for themselves.
  38. 38. The biggest challenges? Stakeholder engagement and buy-in Resource and funding Content planning Image Source:Gizmodo Wednesday 1 February 12 One of your biggest challenges will be to get stakeholder engagement. You might experience technophobes and social media skeptics. You have to kill this with information. Information and experience - get them onto social media so they can see it for themselves.
  39. 39. The biggest challenges? Stakeholder engagement and buy-in Resource and funding Content planning Guidelines Image Source:Gizmodo Wednesday 1 February 12 One of your biggest challenges will be to get stakeholder engagement. You might experience technophobes and social media skeptics. You have to kill this with information. Information and experience - get them onto social media so they can see it for themselves.
  40. 40. The biggest challenges? Stakeholder engagement and buy-in Resource and funding Content planning Guidelines Creating a social strategy Image Source:Gizmodo Wednesday 1 February 12 One of your biggest challenges will be to get stakeholder engagement. You might experience technophobes and social media skeptics. You have to kill this with information. Information and experience - get them onto social media so they can see it for themselves.
  41. 41. The biggest challenges? Stakeholder engagement and buy-in Resource and funding Content planning Guidelines Creating a social strategy Getting started! Image Source:Gizmodo Wednesday 1 February 12 One of your biggest challenges will be to get stakeholder engagement. You might experience technophobes and social media skeptics. You have to kill this with information. Information and experience - get them onto social media so they can see it for themselves.
  42. 42. Getting the green light • Build a business case • Identify resource and budget required • Engage key stakeholders • Clarify rules of enagement • Minimise risk 16 Image Source: Nathan W Bingham on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 Build a business case! Why is this right for you? What will it cost to do it? What could it cost you if you don’t? Minimise the risk for them to say yes! To do this you need a cohesive strategy - a plan of action!
  43. 43. A social media strategy What do you want achieve? How will you make it work? How will you know if it has? How will you evolve? Wednesday 1 February 12
  44. 44. What do you want social media to Engagement? Attitudinal shift? Increased footfall? Increased awareness? Decrease complaint volume? Create advocacy? Are you clear about your goals? Image Source: Atomic Shed on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 If you don’t have a clear reason to be, then you probably shouldn’t be doing anything. Sometimes, it’s OK just to listen and monitor what’s going on. You might not be ready to establish social media presence - that’s OK. It might not be right for your organisation - but ALWAYS listen. Then you’ll be ready if/when things change and your do need to start building a presence. Listening will uncover the “why” of social media for your organisation. And will continue to tell you why... or why not.
  45. 45. Where should you do it? Where is the conversation happening? How appropriate is it that you join in? What is your presence in this channel designed to achieve? Are you absolutely SURE you should be there? Wednesday 1 February 12 Monitoring should also tell you the “where” too Only pick the channels that are relevant. If it’s not appropriate for you to establish an active presence in a channel - look for other ways to get your message there. Look to your advocates - are they there? Can they help you? Remember the point about the ticklist? Use your insights to help you establish why you should be in a channel. If relevant, just pick one channel and operate within that singular channel with EXCELLENCE. When you’re ready, and ONLY IF it’s right, then you can scale up to other channels.
  46. 46. What will you do there? What are you going to say? What format will it take? Will you be proactive or reactive? How will you keep it fresh? How will you tell your story? Wednesday 1 February 12 You know why and you know where, but how about the “what”? Think about what you’ll say and how you’ll say it. What does your audience want/need to hear from you? What are the key commentary themes about your organisation/ area of interest? Social media is absolutely not about finding new, “free” channels to push out advertising messages through. Do that and I guarantee nothing will come of it. People will ignore you. Make sure you’re sending out the right information in the right format. At the right time - a quick note on automated messaging, beyond automatic sharing your blog posts, avoid it if you can - people find it disingenuous and you’ll get bitten on the arse sooner or later with a mis-timed message that is at odds with tone of the channel at that time.
  47. 47. Rules of engagement Tone of voice What will and won’t be discussed What users can expect from you How you expect users to behave SLAs Escalation procedure 21 Image source: Alexandra Ferguson on Etsy Wednesday 1 February 12 It’s OK to establish your own rules of engagement. You have to take into account the user behaviour of a particular channel and make sure it’s not at odds with that - but if there are things you can’t discuss online that’s OK. Tell people why and they’ll accept that. If there are times that you will and won’t be available to respond - tell them, they’ll be OK with with too. If there will be instances when you have to remove user content, say from your Facebook page, make sure they know why. And don’t just remove it without comment - tell your community why it’s removed. So they don’t get annoyed and hopefully fewer people will make the same mistake again.
  48. 48. How will you know if it’s worked? How will you measure this? What are your KPIs? What does success look like? Image source: Richard Moross on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 MEASURE what you do. Gina’s going to talk through this more in detail tomorrow. But I can’t emphasise it enough! But you don’t have to measure EVERYTHING! Just because you can, doesn’t always mean that you should! If you’ve figured out the “why” that I mentioned earlier, then your KPIs should be linked to that.
  49. 49. Lesson Two: Tell your story in the right place Clearly defined social media role Clearly defined channel roles Story to tell Two-way communication Award winners! Wednesday 1 February 12 Suffolk County Council Trading Standards: http://suffolktradingstandards.wordpress.com/
  50. 50. A strategy isn’t something static Wednesday 1 February 12 Don’t just work it up, put it in a lever arch file that gets shoved into a cupboard. Or print out an impressively complex info-graphic that just gets posted on a wall. Treat your strategy as a living thing - it will grow and change over time.
  51. 51. Lesson 3: Be willing to adapt 25 Objectives: Improve community engagement Reduce costs Make communications more interactive 24 hour Twitter marathon Hyper-local No clear role for Facebook Wednesday 1 February 12 GMP at set-up. Basically, it was cheaper community outreach! They had nice ideas to get awareness and ignite sharing. They could even be hyper-local with station specific twitter accounts. Nothing’s more relevant than a break in two streets away! But they didn’t know what to do with Facebook - it had no clear role (their ticklist wasn’t working!)
  52. 52. And then... 26 Manchester Riots August 2011 Wednesday 1 February 12 Then England went a bit mad for a few days, last August. Suddenly they had an opportunity to turn their social media assets into a genuinely useful, real-time service to their community. Less cuddly community outreach. More “this is what’s going on now” so that people felt lest afraid and panic was minimised.
  53. 53. 27 Engagement & Reassurance Image source: Ben Proctor on Storify and GMP on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 During the riots - there were real-time updates, so people felt reassured. Compare this to other cities, especially around Tottenham, where there was a lot of vocal criticism of police and fire services for lack of information. After the riots, they kept the community involved. They “named and shamed” those convicted (just as they would traditionally do in the press) and even explained why. They listened to feedback about this from the community and adapted their activity after it - when they made mistakes they held their hands up (no pun intended) and learned from it. They also used YouTube to keep people informed, on a more detailed level, from senior members of the police force - the community could see that GMP were taking social media seriously and it was paying dividends. Community engagement was high enough for GMP to launch “shop a looter” via Twitter and (now with a reason to exist) their Facebook page - integrating Flickr and Youtube content.
  54. 54. 27 After the disturbances Image source: Ben Proctor on Storify and GMP on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 During the riots - there were real-time updates, so people felt reassured. Compare this to other cities, especially around Tottenham, where there was a lot of vocal criticism of police and fire services for lack of information. After the riots, they kept the community involved. They “named and shamed” those convicted (just as they would traditionally do in the press) and even explained why. They listened to feedback about this from the community and adapted their activity after it - when they made mistakes they held their hands up (no pun intended) and learned from it. They also used YouTube to keep people informed, on a more detailed level, from senior members of the police force - the community could see that GMP were taking social media seriously and it was paying dividends. Community engagement was high enough for GMP to launch “shop a looter” via Twitter and (now with a reason to exist) their Facebook page - integrating Flickr and Youtube content.
  55. 55. 27 After the disturbances Image source: Ben Proctor on Storify and GMP on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 During the riots - there were real-time updates, so people felt reassured. Compare this to other cities, especially around Tottenham, where there was a lot of vocal criticism of police and fire services for lack of information. After the riots, they kept the community involved. They “named and shamed” those convicted (just as they would traditionally do in the press) and even explained why. They listened to feedback about this from the community and adapted their activity after it - when they made mistakes they held their hands up (no pun intended) and learned from it. They also used YouTube to keep people informed, on a more detailed level, from senior members of the police force - the community could see that GMP were taking social media seriously and it was paying dividends. Community engagement was high enough for GMP to launch “shop a looter” via Twitter and (now with a reason to exist) their Facebook page - integrating Flickr and Youtube content.
  56. 56. 27 After the disturbances Image source: Ben Proctor on Storify and GMP on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 During the riots - there were real-time updates, so people felt reassured. Compare this to other cities, especially around Tottenham, where there was a lot of vocal criticism of police and fire services for lack of information. After the riots, they kept the community involved. They “named and shamed” those convicted (just as they would traditionally do in the press) and even explained why. They listened to feedback about this from the community and adapted their activity after it - when they made mistakes they held their hands up (no pun intended) and learned from it. They also used YouTube to keep people informed, on a more detailed level, from senior members of the police force - the community could see that GMP were taking social media seriously and it was paying dividends. Community engagement was high enough for GMP to launch “shop a looter” via Twitter and (now with a reason to exist) their Facebook page - integrating Flickr and Youtube content.
  57. 57. 27 After the disturbances Driving community action Responding to feedback Implementing change Admit to mistakes! Image source: Ben Proctor on Storify and GMP on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 During the riots - there were real-time updates, so people felt reassured. Compare this to other cities, especially around Tottenham, where there was a lot of vocal criticism of police and fire services for lack of information. After the riots, they kept the community involved. They “named and shamed” those convicted (just as they would traditionally do in the press) and even explained why. They listened to feedback about this from the community and adapted their activity after it - when they made mistakes they held their hands up (no pun intended) and learned from it. They also used YouTube to keep people informed, on a more detailed level, from senior members of the police force - the community could see that GMP were taking social media seriously and it was paying dividends. Community engagement was high enough for GMP to launch “shop a looter” via Twitter and (now with a reason to exist) their Facebook page - integrating Flickr and Youtube content.
  58. 58. Ongoing iteration 28 Wednesday 1 February 12
  59. 59. Ongoing iteration 28 1. Discovery phase Listen to what’s being said Key commentary themes Channel identification Wednesday 1 February 12
  60. 60. Ongoing iteration 28 1. Discovery phase 2. Activity scoping Clarify roles for channels and content Map to objectives Allocate resource & budget Wednesday 1 February 12
  61. 61. Ongoing iteration 28 1. Discovery phase 2. Activity scoping 3. Operational framework Communication guidelines Crisis Preparation “Rules of engagement” Escalation procedure Wednesday 1 February 12
  62. 62. Ongoing iteration 28 1. Discovery phase 2. Activity scoping 3. Operational framework 4. Content planning What you say Where you say it What format to say it in When you say it Wednesday 1 February 12
  63. 63. Ongoing iteration 28 1. Discovery phase 2. Activity scoping 3. Operational framework 4. Content planning 5. Measurement What you will measure How you will measure it How it will be evaluated What you want to see & when Wednesday 1 February 12
  64. 64. Ongoing iteration 28 1. Discovery phase 2. Activity scoping 3. Operational framework 4. Content planning 5. Measurement 6. Activity Get going! Wednesday 1 February 12
  65. 65. Ongoing iteration 28 1. Discovery phase 2. Activity scoping 3. Operational framework 4. Content planning 5. Measurement 6. Activity Constant appraisal & iteration Wednesday 1 February 12
  66. 66. Take a bit of a leap of faith 29 Image source: Great Beyond on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 All the theory in the world will only do so much. With social media there comes a point when you just need to get stuck in. You’ll never really understand it until you are in it.
  67. 67. Start small, learn and grow 30 Image source: InteractiveMark Wednesday 1 February 12 Don’t feel like you have to do it all in one go. Start small, make some mistakes (and you will!), admit them, learn from them, then grow when you’re ready!
  68. 68. Questions? 31 Image source: Eleaf on Flickr Wednesday 1 February 12 Any questions? If you have any afterwards, drop me a line any time...
  69. 69. Questions? 31 Image source: Eleaf on Flickr Twitter: @curlydena LinkedIn: Dena Walker Wednesday 1 February 12 Any questions? If you have any afterwards, drop me a line any time...

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