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VL3 Summary Report May 2012

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VL3 Summary Report May 2012

  1. 1. VL3 English:Progress and Agenda T h e C u lt u r e P le x T e a m cultureplex@gmail.com
  2. 2. What’s been done:• Scenarios translations from Spanish to English• Additional relevant vocabulary• Close examination of English Next textbooks by Hueber, and other sources• Charts comparing A1, A2, and B1 of VL3 and English Next• Examination of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR)• Chart outlining what the CEFR expects at each level A1-C2• Dr. Glearning work shop• Dr. Glearning activities for A1 and A2• Pop-ups for A1 and A2• English grammars started
  3. 3. Comparisons English Next A1, A2 and B1 by Hueber
  4. 4. A1 Comparison ChartKey: • Subjects that are missing from VL3 but are present in English Next • Subjects that are present in VL3 but not in English Next • Vocabulary present in both VL3 and English Next but are found in different sections within A1 • Grammar present in both VL3 and English Next but are found in different sections within A1 • Subjects in both VL3 and English Next but are found in different sections of A2 or B1 VL3 English Next A1 TextbookContext 1: Vocabulary • Greetings and leave-taking Unit 1: Vocabulary • Greetings and leave takingsHello, how • Expressions of courtesy My • Expressions of courtesyare you? • Introducing yourself and others English • Introducing yourself and others • Saying where you are from and asking others • Saying where you are from and asking others • Say and ask where people live class Grammar • Simple present of verb to be • “How are you?” and responses • Personal pronouns ( I, my, you, your, we, our) • People around us (friend, person, etc.) • Contractions (I’m) • Questions and short answers • Singular and plural nouns (student  students, etc.) Grammar • Simple present form of the verb to be and to live Unit 2: Vocabulary • “How are you?” and responses • Question words (who, what, where…) and short Friends • Say and ask where people live answers • Say and ask what people do and • Contractions (I’m) • How to ask for help colleagues • Say what people can do/are able to do • Numbers 1-20 • Pronounciation of vowels a, e, i, o, and u Grammar • Simple present • The verb to be able (can) • Verbal expression: to be able to/can • Articles (a, an) • More pronouns (she, her, he, his, they, their) • Verbs in 3rd person singularContext 2: Vocabulary • Activities in the classroom Unit 3: Vocabulary • Food and drinkWhat do • Days of the week A matter • Coloursyou have • Daily activities of taste • Numbers 1-100to do • Days of the weektoday? • Say what you like and what you don’t like to eat/drink
  5. 5. A2 Comparison ChartKey: • Subjects that are missing from VL3 but are present in English Next • Subjects that are present in VL3 but not in English Next • Vocabulary present in both VL3 and English Next but are found in different sections within A2 • Grammar present in both VL3 and English Next but are found in different sections within A2 • Subjects in both VL3 and English Next but are found in different sections of A1 or B1 VL3 English Next A2 TextbookContext 1: Vocabulary • Members of the family Unit 1: Vocabulary • Spell your nameThe family • Descriptive adjectives with the verb to be Old friends • Describing appearance and personal and new characteristics, nationality, etc. • Hobbies and interests, family and work life • Paying compliments to people Grammar • Questions with to be and to do (“Is she…?” “Does he…?”) • Present progressive with learning • Conditional expression: would like (to) Grammar • Practice with the present and future tenses Unit 2: Vocabulary • Travel experience and airport words • Brief introduction to comparative adjectives Destinations • Countries and places to travel • Going on holiday • Making accommodations • Numbers (flight numbers etc.) Grammar • Present perfect with “ever” and “never” • Simple preterit • Simple conditional and contractions (I’d like a(n)/to…) • Adverbs of manner (the light blue suitcase, the hard plastic binder…)Context 2: Vocabulary • More on the family Unit 3: Vocabulary • Food and drink, ordering foodThings Food for • Recommend and describe restaurantsfrom the friends • Quantities and numbers (a bottle of, 2 cups of…)past • Reading recipes, making shopping lists • Going to a party Grammar • “some” vs. “any” • “much” vs. “many” • “a lot” vs. “a few” • Imperatives from recipe (add 2 tsps…)
  6. 6. CEFR Examination of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) Chart outlining what the CEFR expects at each level A1-C2 o Detailed outline of what is expected of a language learner in understanding/comprehension; speaking/production; and reading/writing, at each of the 6 levels
  7. 7. CEFR Comparison ChartMain • To promote plurilingualism, better communication, and closer cooperation between European countries, so that it may not only assist with education,Goals of culture and science, but also trade and industrythe CEFR • To ensure that a standard of teaching languages is met in all European nations so that all people may have equal access to effective means of acquiring knowledge of the languages required for everyday like • To prevent discrimination and marginalization of those lacking the necessary communication skills, and to promote tolerance and acceptance amongst Europeans • To understand that language learning is a life-long taskA1 • Can understand, recognize and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases concerning him/herself, their family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly Comprehension • Can link words or groups of words with very basic linear connectors like ‘and’ or ‘then’ • Can follow speech which is very slow and carefully articulated, with long pauses for him/her to assimilate meaning and • Can understand instructions addressed carefully and slowly to him/her and follow short, simple directions Understanding • Can ask people for things, and give people things • Can handle numbers, quantities, cost and time • Can indicate time by such phrases as next week, last Friday, in November, three o’clock • Can introduce him/herself and others and use basic greeting and leave-taking expressions • Can ask how people are • Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help; communication is totally dependent on repetition, rephrasing and repair Production and • Can ask and answer simple questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has Speaking • Can produce simple mainly isolated phrases about people and places • Can manage very short, isolated, mainly pre-packaged utterances, with much pausing to search for expressions, to articulate less familiar words, and to repair communication • Shows only limited control of a few simple grammatical structures and sentence patterns in a memorized repertoire • Can understand and write familiar names, words and very simple sentences, in common, everyday situations • Can fill in forms with personal details, for example entering name, date of birth, age, nationality and address on a hotel registration form Reading and • Can read and understand very short, simple texts a single phrase at a time, picking up familiar names, words and basic phrases and rereading as required Writing • Can read and follow short, simple written directions (e.g. to go from X to Y) • Can ask for or pass on personal details in written form • Shows only limited control of a few simple grammatical structures and sentence patterns in a learnt repertoireA2 • Can understand sentences and frequently used vocabulary and expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance • Can deal with practical everyday demands such as travel, lodgings, eating and shopping • Can give and follow simple directions and instructions, e.g. explain how to get somewhere Comprehension • Can catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements • Can understand enough to be able to meet needs of a concrete type provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated and • Can understand enough to manage simple, routine tasks without undue effort, asking for repetition when he/she does not understand Understanding • Can make and respond to suggestions • Can ask for and provide everyday goods and services • Can give and receive information about quantities, numbers, prices, etc. • Can make simple purchases by stating what is wanted and asking the price • Can use simple everyday polite forms of greeting and address • Can establish social contact: greetings and farewells; introductions; giving thanks Production and • Can make and respond to invitations, suggestions and apologies Speaking • Can ask and answer questions and exchange ideas and information on familiar topics in predictable everyday situations • Can order a meal • Can ask for and provide personal information
  8. 8. Pop-UpsA1 - Context 1: Hello, how are you?Machine: Hello! How are you? Pop-up: Greet the avatar! Tell her how you are today. Try “I’m good” or “I am fine, thanks.” Then, ask her howshe is!Student: Hi/hello! I am fine, how are you?Machine: Good, thanks. What’s your name? Pop-up: Tell the avatar your name! Try “My name is…”/ “My name’s…”Student: My name is David.Machine: It’s nice to meet you, David! I’m Lauren. Pop-up: Use an expression of courtesy. Try “It’s great to meet you” or “I’m pleased to meet you”Student: It is a pleasure to meet you, Lauren.Machine: What is your last name, David? My last name is Turner. Pop-up: Tell the avatar your last name! For example: “My last name is Smith”Student: My last name is Perez.Machine: Where are you from, David Perez? Pop-up: Tell the avatar where you are from in a full sentence. Then ask where she is from in return. Forexample: “I am from Belgium. Where are you from?”Student: I am from Columbia. Where are you from?Machine: I come from the United States, but I live in Canada. Where do you live? Pop-up: Tell the avatar where you live. Start with “I live in…”Student: I live in Canada too.Machine: Very interesting! See you later. Pop-up: Use a leave-taking expression. Try “Goodbye” or “See you later”Student: See you later/goodbye.
  9. 9. Dr. GlearningActivity Description A1 Context 1: Hello, how are you? In this course you will learn about expressions of courtesy and common greetings, and find out where others are from.To be or not to be Im from Germany but Laura _______ from Germany. She ____ from France.Quiz (10 activities) •Is / are •Isn’t / is •Am / ’m e)Am / isWho am I? Hello, I am ___________ and I am president of ___________ .Visual (10 activities) •Celine Dion / Canada •Gandhi / India d)Barack Obama / The United States
  10. 10. Dr. GlearningActivity Description A2 Context 2: What do you have to do today? In this course you will learn to use the verb to have with activities of daily life.I have to… Mr. and Mrs. Smith have to ...Linguistic (10 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (go shopping)activities)Wants and Needs Carmen has to write an exam in 2 days. She ...Quiz (10 activities) •Needs to eat •Wants to go shopping •Wants to go to the doctor e)Needs to study
  11. 11. Dr. GlearningActivity Description A1 context 3: Life and Times Learn about professions and careers, personal and physical characteristics, and telling time.What do You See? Joanna works in a courthouse. She is a ...Linguistic (10 activities) _ _ _ _ _ _ (lawyer)Telling Time Look at the pictures. What time is it?Visual (10 activities) •12 noon •7 am •5:15 in the afternoon •8 pmAttributes Describe the physical trait: Helen will never change her hair. She is forever ...Linguistic (10 activities) _ _ _ _ _ _ (blonde)
  12. 12. On the Agenda• Continue with pop-ups for B1• Continue to add vocabulary• Begin grammar for each context• Revise existing Dr. Glearning activities and create new ones

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